Resources for Teachers

These activities are intended for use by class teachers to support planning for home learning activities across the primary phase. Activities are linked to Early Learning Goals and National Curriculum objectives.

Class teachers will need to consider whether learners are familiar with the concepts needed to engage with these activities. Where this is not the case, they will need to provide opportunities for learners to encounter the necessary knowledge and skills.  For example, where an activity requires learners to construct a graph, teachers will need to provide opportunities for learners to engage with the concept to ensure they have the skills and knowledge required to complete the task.

Not every curriculum area is represented in every year group. Activities have been provided where there is a meaningful link to curriculum content for that year group.

Activities can be moved between year groups with modifications to suit the level of challenge that may be required.

EYFS

Communication and Language
Learning TaskEarly Learning Goals Link
Talk with a grown up. Why is it important to wash our hands? Learn how to effectively wash your hands. Learn songs that help you to remember what to do:
How to wash your hands NHS song
Washy Washy Clean

Can you teach a grown up how to wash their hands properly?
ELG 01
Children listen attentively in a range of situations.

ELG 02
Children follow instructions involving several ideas or actions. They answer ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events.

ELG 03
Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners' needs.
Point to body parts as directed by an adult and name them.

Carry out a sequence of actions such as clap your hands, touch your toes, wave your arms.

Sing "One Finger, One Thumb, Keep Moving" and move the relevant body parts as you sing.

Use the song "Dry Bones" illustrated on "Sing-Along Kids" on YouTube.

Use "The Skeleton Dance" on YouTube from "Super Simple Songs".
Learn the dance.

Play Simon Says.
ELG 02
Children follow instructions involving several ideas or actions.

Children learn which part of the body is next to another.
Listen to "I Don't Want Curly Hair".
Can you remember the different ways in which the girl tried to straighten her hair?
What were some of the words she used to describe her hair?
ELG 01
Children listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions.
Read Eric Carle's "From Head to Toe"
Act out the actions in the story as you come across them.

Read "The Listening Walk." by Paul Showers. After you have read the story, recall some of the sounds the girl hears on her listening walk. Make and act out the sounds. Carry out a listening walk around your home or with an adult around your neighbourhood.

Reflect on "The Listening Walk." Remember what order things were heard in the story. Try to remember what you heard on your own listening walk. Which sounds were familiar, new, near, far away etc.?
ELG 01
Children listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions.
Physical Development
Learning TaskEarly Learning Goals Link
Learn how to effectively wash your hands.
Learn songs that help you to remember what to do:
How to wash your hands NHS song
Washy Washy Clean

Can you teach a grown up how to wash their hands properly?
ELG 05
Children manage their own basic hygiene and personal needs successfully.
Learn the song "Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes" with actions

Can you make up your own version of this song with the bits of the body in a different order, or using different body parts? (Wrists, elbows, back and neck, back and neck…)
ELG 04
Children show good control and co-ordination in large and small movements.
Can you move around in different ways including without your feet touching the floor? Try moving quickly and slowly, standing tall and crouching low.ELG 04
Children move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space.
Personal, Social and Emotional Development
Learning TaskEarly Learning Goals Link
Learn the song "Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes" with actions

Can you make up your own version of this song with the bits of the body in a different order, or using different body parts? (Wrists, elbows, back and neck, back and neck…)
ELG 08
Children play co-operatively, taking turns with others.
Reflect and share from “The Listening Walk.” Either remember what order things were heard in the story, or link it to the listening walk that you have just done and talk about which sounds were familiar, new, near, far away etc.ELG 06
Children are confident to try new activities, and say why they like some activities more than others. They are confident to speak in a familiar group, will talk about their ideas, and will choose the resources they need for their chosen activities. They say when they do or don’t need help
Literacy Development
Learning TaskEarly Learning Goals Link
Can you read these body part words? Leg, hip, back, neck, arm, lip, chin, cheek, feet, hand, rib?ELG 09 Reading
They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately.
Sign in to Oxford Owl and read the e-books Hands and Run, Run, Run in the section for 4-5 year olds.ELG 09 Reading
Children read and understand simple sentences.
They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.
Ask an adult to draw round you on a big sheet of paper or draw a smaller picture of yourself. Can you label five parts of your body?ELG 10 Writing:
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds.
Complete these sentences –
I use my hands to ………
I use my feet to …….

Which parts of your body did you most use on your listening walk. Why?
ELG 10 Writing:
Children write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible.
Write down any names of things that were making sounds during your listening walk e.g. car, bird, dog etc.ELG 10 Writing:
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds.
Mathematics
Learning TaskEarly Learning Goals Link
Set physical challenges: How far can you jump? How high can you jump? What is the longest stride you can take? How far can you throw or kick a ball? Discuss how these tasks could be measured. Who can throw, jump or kick the furthest?ELG 12
Shape, space and measures:
Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems.
Compare the size of different family members. Who is the tallest? Who has the biggest feet? Discuss what you could use to find this out. You could use lengths of string, or measure using Lego bricks, as well as measuring in centimetres.ELG 12
Shape, space and measures:
Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems.
Have some replica bones. They could be paper ones. Measure how long the bones are using non-standard units. Can they count the non-standard units accurately?ELG 11 Numbers:
Children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20.

ELG 12
Shape, space and measures:
Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems.
Measure, using strides or hand spans,
a room, your garden or balcony. Explore what else they could measure.
ELG 11 Numbers:
Children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20.

ELG 12
Shape, space and measures:
Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems.
What numbers are linked to your body? For example, how many fingers, ears, teeth etc. do you have? Now try a challenge ---- use a mirror to think how many eyelashes you might have.ELG 11 Numbers:
Children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20.
Expressive Arts and Design
Learning TaskEarly Learning Goals Link
Learn the song "Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes" with actions.

Can you make up your own version of this song with the bits of the body in a different order, or using different body parts? (Wrists, elbows, back and neck, back and neck…)
ELG 16
Children sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them.
Printing - Explore using finger printing, hands and feet to create pictures. Can you cut your hands and feet out and make a collage?

Can you make a model of your body out of play dough or plasticine? Now make one of a friend or of someone else in your family; what is the same and what is different?
ELG 16
Children safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.

ELG 17
Children use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about uses and purposes. They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role play and stories.
Look at pictures of skeletons and read the story "Funny Bones" by Janet & Allan Alberg.

Look at images of skeletons.
Create skeletons using twigs and sticks outside. Alternatively, you could use straws or cotton buds.
Take a photo of your skeleton.
ELG 15
Children recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools. They select and use technology for particular purposes.

ELG 16
Children safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.
Draw around your body outside using chalks or on the back of some wallpaper. Recreate a life size you! Think imaginatively – who would you like to be? How would you like to be dressed? Chalk, paint or use collage materials to show this.ELG 16
Children safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.

Year 1

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read "The Haircut"

How does this compare with when you have visited the hairdressers?
Read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught.

Link what they read or hear to their own experiences.
Listen to "I Don’t Want Curly Hair".

Why didn’t the girl want to have curly hair?
Can you remember some of the words she used to describe her hair?
How would you describe your hair?
Listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently...
Can you read these body words? Leg, hip, back, arm, lip, chin, neck, cheek, feet, hand, rib, toe, ear, hair, chest, head, foot, mouth, elbow, nose.Apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Draw an outline of a body and label 10 parts of it.Spell words containing each of the 40+ phonemes already taught.
Look at yourself in a mirror. Now write a description of yourself. Read the description to someone else - do they think you have described yourself well?

Check there are spaces between your words and that you have used capital letters and full stops where you need them.
Write sentences by:
- saying out loud what they are going to write about
- composing a sentence orally before writing it
- read aloud their writing clearly enough to be heard.
Vocabulary, Punctuation and Grammar
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at yourself in a mirror. Now write a description of yourself. Read the description to someone else - do they think you have described yourself well?

Check there are spaces between your words and that you have used capital letters and full stops where you need them.
Separation of words with spaces.
Introduction to capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Talk about a time when you had your hair cut.

Were you pleased with how it looked afterwards?

Did you enjoy having it cut?
Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes including expressing feelings.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Explore how many things you can do in one minute.

How many star jumps?

How many bunny hops?

How many times can you throw and catch a ball?
Compare, describe and solve practical problems involving time.
Measure different parts of the body with non-standard and standard units (hand span, foot, elbow to wrist etc.).

Measure someone else.

How do they compare to yours?

Use the language of longer/shorter.
Compare, describe and solve practical problems for lengths and heights [for example, long/short, longer/shorter, tall/short, double/half].
Practise body counting in 10s, 5s and 2s.Count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals; count in multiples of twos, fives and tens.
Make a timeline of photos of you from birth to present day.

Label with the number of months and years old.
Recognise and use language relating to dates, including days of the week, weeks, months and years.
Follow a set of instructions to follow a route around your home or garden.

For example, take a certain number of steps, and make whole, half, quarter and three-quarter turns.
Describe position, direction and movement, including whole, half, quarter and three-quarter turns.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look for some pictures of animals online or in books and magazines.

Talk about them and compare them. Can you see legs? Can you see eyes? Can you see other parts of the body? Compare them to people. Talk about how they are the same and how they are different.

Sort your pictures into groups. Maybe animals which have legs, and which don’t. Or animals which have wings, and which don’t.
Describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, including pets).

Identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense.
Take a photo of yourself – ideally full length. Print it out or copy it into a Word document or similar on a computer. Or find a photo of a person in a magazine.

Label the following:
Eyes, ear, nose, mouth, hair, arm, leg, neck, shoulder, knee, elbow, ankle, foot.

Write some sentences about yourself or the picture that you are using. For example, “I see with my eyes. My eyes are green.” Or “I use my legs to walk and run.”
Identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at the work of Andrew Goldsworthy and how he uses natural materials to create art.

Look at pictures of skeletons and read the story “Funny Bones” by Janet & Allan Alberg.

Look at images of skeletons.

Create skeletons using twigs and sticks outside.

Alternatively, you could use straws or cotton buds.

Take a photo of your skeleton.

How is it similar/different to Andrew Goldsworthy’s art?
Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
Make pictures by blowing paint through straws. What can you create? How long can you blow? How far can you make the paint go?Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Paint or draw portraits of your family members.Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design a healthy meal for a healthy body! Can you make this meal alongside someone else?Use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes.

Understand where food comes from.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
On a globe or using an atlas identify the world’s coldest places and the world’s warmest places. Imagine what it would be like to live in these areas. What would you wear? How would the seasons vary?Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Work with a grown up to find out about a famous doctor or nurse. What did they discover that has helped keep us fit and healthy, or how did they help other people?

You could start here:

Edward Jenner
Florence Nightingale - Link 1 | Link 2
Mary Seacole

Draw a picture to show what they did and why they are famous. Write underneath what they did in your own words.
Learn about the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Sing the songs Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes and If You’re Happy and You Know it Clap your Hands.Children use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.
Create a piece of music using body sounds such as clapping, clicking fingers, stamping feet and making mouth noises such as shhhh and ooooo.Experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Explore how many things you can do in one minute. How many star jumps? How many bunny hops? How many times can you throw and catch a ball?

Practice for 20 minutes every day for a week.

At the end of the week, are you able to do more in a minute than you could at the start?
Develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and coordination, individually and with others. They should be able to engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations.
Explore how many different parts of your body you can balance on. Can you move with your weight on different parts of your body?Master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities.

Year 2

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Sign up for Oxford Owl and read What’s Inside Me? e-book (age 6-7).

Think of 5 facts you learnt from the book.
Children are introduced to non-fiction books that are structured in different ways.
Can you read these body words? Leg, hip, back, arm, lip, chin, neck, cheek, feet, hand, rib, toe, ear, hair, chest, head, foot, mouth, eyes, nose, elbow, wrist, knee, ankle, shoulder, head, face, heart, kidney.Read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught so far, especially recognising alternative sounds for graphemes.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Use the facts you learnt from reading What’s Inside Me? to create a body fact file. What else do you know about the human body that you could add to it?Write for different purposes.
Look at yourself in a mirror. Now write a description of yourself using a range of adjectives. Try to vary how the sentences start. Read the description to someone else – do they think you have described yourself well?Encapsulate what they want to say, sentence by sentence.

Read aloud what they have written with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear.
Draw an outline of a body and label at least 15 body parts.Learn new ways of spelling phonemes for which one or more spellings are already known, and learn some words with each spelling, including a few common homophones.
Vocabulary, Punctuation and Grammar
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at yourself in a mirror. Now write a description of yourself using a range of adjectives. Try to vary how the sentences start. Read the description to someone else – do they think you have described yourself well?Use expanded noun phrases for description and specification.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are describing yourself to someone who cannot see you. Talk about how you look, what you like doing, what makes you happy and what makes you sad.Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes including expressing feelings.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Shopping for a healthy body. Find some prices for healthy food products. How could you pay with coins? Can you find three other ways to make the same amount?Recognise and use symbols for pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value.
How many bunny hops can you do in one minute? Get an adult to time you and count how many you can do daily. Keep a block graph or a bar graph every day to record how many you can do.

Calculate how many you could do in two minutes, 5 minutes, 10 minutes or even an hour.
Interpret and construct simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables.

Know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day.
Do some body counting in 10s, 5s, 2s and 3s.Count in steps of 2, 3, and 5 from 0, and in tens from any number, forward and backward.
Find out all the ages of family members.
Use these numbers to:
- Recognise the place value (tens and ones)
- Plot these numbers in order on an empty number line
- Use the use <, > and = signs to make statements about family members ages.
- Write the ages in words.
Recognise the place value of each digit in a two-digit number (tens, ones).

Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations, including the number line.

Compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; use <, > and = signs.
Read and write numbers to at least 100 in numerals and in words.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Gather together some things from around your house, from the garden, or from the park. Also, you could take photos or use photos from magazines or the internet.

Sort your things by whether they are alive, dead, or have never been alive. For example, a twig is dead. A pot plant is alive. A picture of a dog running is a picture of something that is alive. A mug has never been alive.
Explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive.
What did you have for lunch? Create a food chain for your lunch. For example, of you ate a ham sandwich, your food chain would look something like this:

Food Chain Example

You could draw or cut out pictures instead:

Food Chain Example
Describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food.
Create some life cycles. Find pictures of animals as they grow up. For example, a new-born puppy, a puppy a few months old, a young adult dog, an old dog. Maybe you have some pictures of a family pet at different ages. Put them in order from youngest to oldest. Talk about how the animal changes as they grow older.

Do the same for a person. Find images of a baby, toddler, child, teenager, adult and older adult. Put them on order. How do they change?

Find a baby photo of yourself and a photo of you now. Write about how your appearance has changed. Write down some of the things that you can do now that you could not do as a baby.
Notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults.
How many bunny hops can you do in a minute? Get an adult to time you and count how many you can do.
Keep practicing your hops. Every day, get an adult to time you and see how many you can do. Keep a block graph or a bar graph every day to record how many you can do. Do you get better over time with practice and exercise?

Watch “PE With Joe Wicks” every day on YouTube.
Try to remember some of the exercises that he shows you. How many can you do in 30 seconds? What happens to you when you exercise? Talk about it with an adult. Design a poster about why we need to exercise. You could look at the following for ideas:
Exercise for Children - Factual Reasons and Tips To Get Moving
Why Exercise? - Sid The Science Kid - The Jim Henson Company
Why do you need exercise?
BBC Learning - What Do Humans Need To Stay Healthy
Describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene.
You are what you eat.
People need a healthy balance of food to make sure that they are fit and well. For example, it is OK to eat sweets, but not too many of them because too much sugar is not good for you.
Keep a tally chart over a week. How many portions of fruit and vegetables do you have? How many packets of crisps or sweets do you have? Discuss with an adult what you are eating that is really good for you and what is a nice treat that you can have every now and again.
Describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene.
Design a poster or film a short video about how to wash your hands thoroughly.Describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Paint portraits of your family members.Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Take a selfie of your own face. Print it out, cut it out and draw a line through the middle vertically from the skull to the chin. Take one half and stick to a sheet of paper. Can you draw the other half of the face?Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Design a lift the flap body page in the style of What’s Inside Me?Use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design a lift the flap body page in the style of What’s Inside Me?Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.

Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.

Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
On a globe or using an atlas identify the world’s coldest places and the world’s warmest places. Imagine what it would be like to live in these areas. What would you wear? How would the seasons vary? What do you think your life would be like in each of these places?Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find out about a famous doctor or nurse. What did they discover that has helped keep us fit and healthy, or how did they help other people?

You could start looking here:

Marie Curie
Louis Pasteur
William Harvey

Create a poster to explain what this person is famous for.
Learn about the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Sing the songs Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes and If You’re Happy and You Know it Clap your Hands.Children use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.
Create a piece of music using body sounds such as clapping, clicking fingers, stamping feet and making mouth noises such as shhhh and ooooo. Vary the volume and the rhythms you use.Experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
How many bunny hops can you do in a minute? Get an adult to time you and count how many you can do.
Keep practicing your hops. Every day, get an adult to time you and see how many you can do. Keep a block graph or a bar graph every day to record how many you can do. Do you get better over time with practice and exercise?

Watch “PE With Joe Wicks” every day on YouTube.
Try to remember some of the exercises that he shows you. How many can you do in 30 seconds? What happens to you when you exercise? Talk about it with an adult. Design a poster about why we need to exercise. You could look at the following for ideas:
Exercise for Children - Factual Reasons and Tips To Get Moving
Why Exercise? - Sid The Science Kid - The Jim Henson Company
Why do you need exercise?
BBC Learning - What Do Humans Need To Stay Healthy
Discuss the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene.
Explore how many different parts of your body you can balance on. Can you move with your weight on different parts of your body? Try to move in different ways – quickly, slowly, smoothly, jerkily.Master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities.

Year 3

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Watch / listen to some of the Funny Bones stories on YouTube.Listen to and discuss a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks.
Go to Collins Connect and select teacher and sign in:
username - parents@harpercollins co.uk
password - Parents20!
Select Collins Big Cat - white (click on show more under colour list) - non-fiction and choose Your Senses.

Read the book – or have it read to you if you prefer. As you read it, think about the different ways in which the text is laid out – captions, labels, paragraphs.

Complete the activity at the end of the book to check what you have learnt.
Read books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.

Retrieve and record information from non-fiction texts.
Use the internet to research a famous person who was blind and / or deaf. For example, Stevie Wonder, Helen Keller, Ludwig van Beethoven, Thomas Eddison.Identify main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarise these.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write your own Funny Bones story with the same main characters. Include some speech in your story.Draft and write narratives, creating settings, characters and plot.
Choose one of the senses and write an information report about it. Think about how you will organise your work, so it is easy for the reader to follow.Retrieve and record information from non-fiction texts.

Draft and write by, in non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices [for example, headings and sub-headings].
Imagine you were blind or deaf – write a diary entry about a day in your life thinking about what you might do differently from the way you do things.Draft and write by composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.
Go to Spellingframe. Have a go at some of the spelling tiles activities and then to the test.Understand the spelling of ‘ou’ as in young, touch, country.
Vocabulary, Punctuation and Grammar
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write your own Funny Bones story with the same main characters. Include some speech in your story.Introduce inverted commas to punctuate direct speech.
Choose one of the senses and write an information report about it. Think about how you will organise your work, so it is easy for the reader to follow.Introduce paragraphs as a way to group related material.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Tell someone about the person you researched. Plan what you will say beforehand and consider how you will keep your listener interested in what you say.Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of listeners.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Choose ten famous people that you have heard about. They could be pop stars, sports people, politicians and so on. Use the internet to see if you can find how tall these people are / were. Create a bar chart to show their heights. Think about the scale that you are going to use.Measure, compare, add and subtract lengths (m/cm/mm).

Interpret and present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.
Your arm span is the distance between the tips of your fingers on both hands when you stretch your arms out sideways. It is said that this measure is approximately the same as your height. Is this true? What about other people living in your home?Measure, compare, add and subtract lengths (m/cm/mm).
Make a body clock. Write the numbers 1-12 on different pieces of paper and arrange them like a clock face. Lie down so that 12 is above your head and 6 is at your feet.
Get an adult to tell you sometimes. Use your arms as the hands of the clock. Where do you have to point your hands to show the time? Remember – the minute hand is longer than the hour hand, so you may want to hold a pencil or a ruler in one hand to make that arm longer.
Tell and write the time from an analogue clock.
How much faster does your heart beat after exercise? Find out how to take your pulse. The start of this video shows you how to sit still for five minutes. Then take your pulse by counting the number of times you feel your pulse beating in one minute. Record this. Then do some exercise for two minutes – running on the spot, or bunny hops around the room, for example. Now feel your pulse again for one minute. Compare the measurement before and after exercise. What is the difference between these two numbers?
Try this with other people in your house. Record the data in a table.
Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts and place value.

Interpret and present data using tables.
Measure the length of different parts of your body – your arm, your leg, your neck measurement, around your head, how long your thumb is and so on.
Do this for other people in your house.
Create a table that shows all of this data.
Talk to an adult about what the data tells you - who has the longest legs / arms / the biggest head in your family?
Interpret and present data using tables.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find out what these nutrients are and why we might need to eat them:
- Protein
- Carbohydrates
- Fat
- Fibre
- Minerals
- Vitamins

You could watch the following:
Nutrient Song for Kids | Food Groups | Learning Video for Children
THE FOOD PYRAMID | Educational Video for Kids.

Which food groups are sources of different nutrients? Make a food pyramid with pictures of the type of foods that fit in to each part of the food pyramid. Watch this video to find out about it.
Identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.
Make a cardboard skeleton

Find out about what the bones are for and how they fit together. You could watch videos online like this one.

What are some of the names of different bones in the body? Can you label a diagram of the skeleton, or add labels to the model that you have made?
Identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
When you have found some examples of stone age cave paintings (see History), use whatever art materials you may have to create your own cave paintings. You could create your own version of a stone age scene or make a version what shows people doing modern day things but in a stone age style. For example, how might you create an image of a person using a mobile phone, but make it look like a stone age cave painting?Pupils should be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.
Sketch members of your family going about their everyday life.Pupils should be taught to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Pupils should be taught to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Look at silhouettes by artists in the past. Can you make a silhouette portrait in monochrome of yourself or someone else?Pupils should be taught to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].

Pupils should be taught about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design a new piece of sports equipment to keep us healthy in the 21st century. Be as creative as you like.When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria

generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Use a globe or an atlas to identify the features specified. What are lines of longitude and latitude?
What are the key differences between the area around the Equator and the area within the Arctic Circle?
How have people had to adapt their clothing to survive in these areas? How else do the conditions in these areas impact on people’s lives?
Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Arctic and Antarctic Circle.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Stone age people created the first images of the human form.
Find out about how stone age people painted images on the walls of caves.

You could start by looking here or here.

Find images online of cave paintings that include images of people.

Create a poster or a leaflet about these early cave paintings of people.
They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Collins Connect and select teacher and sign in:
username - parents@harpercollins co.uk
password - Parents20!

Choose Musical Express, Lesson Bank, Year 3, Human Body. Have a go at Activity 1 for Bones, Muscles and Skeleton.
Using what you have around you in your house, create some music to go with one of these songs.
Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.
Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music.

Year 4

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to some of the Funny Bones stories on YouTube.Listen to and discuss a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks.
Go to Collins Connect select teacher and sign in:
username - parents@harpercollins.co.uk
password - Parents20!

Select Collins Big Cat - lime (click on show more under colour list) - non-fiction and choose Blood.

Read the book. As you read it think about the different ways in which the text is laid out – captions, labels, paragraphs.

Complete the activity at the end of the book to check what you have learnt.
Read books that are structured in different ways and read for a range of purposes.


Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.
Use the internet to research a famous person who has a disability for example Douglas Bader, Tanni Grey-Thompson, Danny Crates. Tell someone what you have learnt.Identify main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarise these.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write your own Funny Bones story with the same main characters. Integrate some dialogue into the story ensuring it is correctly punctuated.In narratives, create settings, characters and plot.
Draw a table with two columns, one with the heading red blood cells and the other white blood cells. Record what you have found out these cells from reading Blood (mention ned above). Then identify ways in which they are the same and ways in which they are different. Use headings and subheadings to organise your work.
When you have completed it check your work to ensure it makes sense and that there are no mistakes.
Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.

Draft and write by, in non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices [for example, headings and sub-headings].


Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.
Imagine you were one of the people you researched. Write a diary from their point of view showing an awareness of difficulties they may encounter because of their disability.Draft and write by composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.
Go to Spellingframe. Have a go at some of the spelling tiles activities and then to the test.Spell prefixes including inter, anti and auto.
Vocabulary, Punctuation and Grammar
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write your own Funny Bones story with the same main characters. Integrate some dialogue into the story ensuring it is correctly punctuated.Use of inverted commas and other punctuation to indicate direct speech [for example, a comma after the reporting clause; end punctuation within inverted commas: The conductor shouted, “Sit Down!”]
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Tell someone about the person you researched. Plan what you will say beforehand and consider how you will keep your listener interested in what you say.Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of listeners.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Measure the length of your foot. Multiply this by 100. Then divide this number by 15 (use a calculator for this last bit if you need to). This is supposed to give you an estimate for your height. Try this with people at home. Is this true? Remember – it is an estimate, not a precise figure.Solve problems involving multiplication and division.

Estimate, compare and calculate different measures.
Measure your height. Use this knowledge to estimate the length of different rooms in your home, or how long your garden or driveway is. See how many times you can lie down across the space – you may need an adult to help you here. When you have estimated the length, measure it as accurately as you can. You could use string to take the measurement and then use a ruler to measure along the string. There are also apps available for most smart phones that turn them in to electronic measuring devices (Google AR Measure, for example).Estimate, compare and calculate different measures.
Find out how long a person’s intestines are. If you lay them out in a line, how long would this be? Try and use string / wool or strips of paper stuck together to show how long this actually is.Estimate, compare and calculate different measures.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Create an encyclopaedia entry about the human digestive system.

You could try watching:

Digestive System | The Dr. Binocs Show | Learn Videos For Kids
Operation Ouch - Digestion | Biology for Kids
or reading about digestion.


Include a short glossary of the important words.
Describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans.
Design a poster for the wall of the local dentists. Include a description of the purpose of different teeth, a diagram of the inside of a tooth, and information on keeping teeth clean. Design it for younger children (5-6 year olds) to understand, so think carefully about your language and making it understandable.Identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Sketch a young and older member of your family. You could observe them or use a photograph.Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Create your silhouette on white paper and then cover it with images and words that reflect you as a person and all things that you love.
Practise the images for inside your silhouette in your sketch book.
Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Look at the work of LS Lowry. He always included many people in his work. How did he create the feeling of movement? Recreate a picture in the style of Lowry set in your town or village. Remember to include key landmarks.Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].

Learn about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are working on a new Funny Bones animation. Can you create a moving skeleton that could be used in filming? Test it out in front of a black background and someone to film it. Evaluate it and make improvements.Design
generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make
select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].

Evaluate
evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Use a globe or an atlas to identify the features specified. Choose a country which spans the Tropic of Cancer and another which spans the Tropic of Capricorn. What are the similarities and differences between life the two countries?Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
The Romans were known for taking baths and keeping themselves clean.
Create an information poster about a visit to a Roman bath house.

You could start by reading this web page.
Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Collins Connect and select teacher and sign in:
username - parents@harpercollins co.uk
password - Parents20!

Choose Musical Express, Lesson Bank, Year 3, Human Body. Have a go at Activity 1 for Bones, Muscles and Skeleton.
Using what you have around you in your house, create music to go with one of these songs using the musical form ABA. Now extend your music so it follows the form ABACADA.
Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.
Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Choose three of the following – flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance – and devise a simple, short, exercise routine to help you develop those areas. Follow the routine every day for at least 2 weeks.Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example, through athletics and gymnastics].

Year 5

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read the poem Warning by Jenny Joseph.

What comparisons does she make between her life now and when she is old? Summarise the message of the poem using no more than 10 words.
Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justify inferences with evidence.

Summarise the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas.
Now read My Grandmother Knitting.
What are the similarities and differences between this poem and the one above? Which do you enjoy the most and why?
Choose one of the poems and learn it by heart before reciting to someone.
Make comparisons within and across books.

Learn a wider range of poetry by heart.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to https://www.pobble365.com/memories/
Describe the man you see in the picture. What do you think he is thinking about? What is he feeling?
Use the story starter on the page to write a story about George and a key event in his life. Use some dialogue within your story to demonstrate George’s character and move the action forward.

When you have finished your story read it through to check that your use of tense is consistent and correct throughout your story.
Draft and write by:
selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
in narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action.

Evaluate and edit by:
ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.
Imagine that you are George. You are finding it hard to live independently in your rambling old house and would like to become a Chelsea Pensioner. Write a letter of application detailing why you should be given this privilege. Talk about your army service and what you achieved and why you are now finding it difficult to stay where you are.

The letter will need to be written in a formal style so consider how that can be achieved for example not using contractions and the use of modal verbs.

Click here for information about being a Chelsea Pensioner.
Plan writing by:
identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own.
Go to Spellingframe. Do some of the spelling tiles activities before taking the test.Spell –cial and tial word endings.
Vocabulary, Punctuation and Grammar
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine that you are George. You are finding it hard to live independently in your rambling old house and would like to become a Chelsea Pensioner. Write a letter of application detailing why you should be given this privilege. Talk about your army service and what you achieved and why you are now finding it difficult to stay where you are.

The letter will need to be written in a formal style so consider how that can be achieved for example not using contractions and the use of modal verbs.

Click here for information about being a Chelsea Pensioner.
Indicate degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must].
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are George and you have been called to an interview at The Chelsea Hospital. Ask someone in your household or someone you connect with online to interview you. You will need to justify why you should be given a place in the hospital.Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English.

Articulate and justify answers.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look on the internet to find the heights of the six tallest men who have ever lived. If they were able to stand on each other’s heads, how tall would they be altogether?

Now do the same for the six tallest women who have ever lived. What is the difference between the combined height of the six tallest men and the combined height of the six tallest women?

Create a bar chart to show the heights of the twelve people that you have found out about. You will need to think about a suitable scale for your axes.
Solve comparison, sum and difference problems.
Chart your pulse rate before exercise, immediately after exercise, five minutes and ten minutes after exercise.

Sit still for five minutes. Then take your pulse rate for a minute – the start of this video reminds you how to do it.
Record your pulse rate.
Then do some exercise for two minutes – press ups, star jumps, jogging on the spot. Take your pulse for a minute immediately when you stop exercising.
Sit still for five minutes, then take your pulse rate for a minute again. Record this.
Sit still for another five minutes. Take your pulse rate again and record it.
Draw a graph for the pulse rates that you have recorded.

Try this with other people in your house. How do their graphs compare to yours?
Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line graph.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find out why humans become old and what happens to our bodies when we are old.

Try watching:
Why Do We Get Old? The Dr. Binocs Show | Best Learning Videos For Kids | Peekaboo Kidz
Why Do We Get GRAY HAIR? | Why Does Hair Turn GRAY? | The Dr Binocs Show | Peekaboo Kidz

Create a leaflet describing what happens to your body when you get old, and ways that older people can stay healthy. You might want to look at the Age UK website for top tips for older people to remain healthy.
Describe the changes as humans develop to old age.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Henri Matisse created a piece of art called “Icarus” in 1947. You can see it here.

The image is inspired by the Ancient Greek story of Icarus. A version can be found here.

Matisse’s art shows a human body (Icarus) against a blue background, surrounded by yellow shapes representing the feathers falling off his wings.
Design a picture inspired by “Icarus” that shows something that is important to you. It might be an image of you playing football as a black figure with the football in yellow. You might make the feet of your body red because they are important to playing football. Or it might be an image of you reading a book, with the book in yellow and your eyes or head in red.
Pupils should be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

Pupils should be taught about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Research the work of Frida Kahlo. Discover the artist behind her famous self – portraits. Create your own self portrait in the style of Frida Kahlo.Pupils should be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

Pupils should be taught about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Sketch contrasting features within your families features.Pupils should be taught to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Pupils should be taught to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design an aid for an older member of your family. Consider what aspects of everyday life might be difficult for an older person. Talk to someone who is older to research this. Research what is already available.When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design
design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.

generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Evaluate

explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Use a globe or atlas to locate the features specified. Find a country which spans the Equator, a country which spans the Tropic of Capricorn and a country which spans the Tropic of Capricorn. Create a table showing the similarities and differences between the 3 countries – for example warmest / coldest month, most / least rainfall, longest / shortest day. Which of these countries would you most like to live in and why?Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle and the Prime/Greenwich Meridian.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
The Ancient Greeks studied medicine and the human body very carefully, although some of their ideas may seem a little strange to us today. One famous Greek doctor was Hippocrates. Find out about this famous doctor. You could start here.

Design a page for a history book about Ancient Greece which tells readers about what you have found out about Hippocrates.
Know about the legacy of Greek culture.

Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Collins Connect and select teacher and sign in:
username - parents@harpercollins co.uk
password - Parents20!

Choose Musical Express, Lesson Bank, Year 5, Keeping Healthy, Body Popping Skeleton and do Activity 1 Step 1 and Activity 2.
Devise your own chant based on another part of the body.
Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.
Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Choose 4 of the following – flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance – and devise a simple, short, exercise routine to help you develop those areas. Follow the routine every day for at least 2 weeks.Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example, through athletics and gymnastics].

Year 6

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read the poem Warning by Jenny Joseph.

What comparisons does she make between her life now and when she is old? How do you think she feels about getting old?

Summarise the message of the poem using no more than 10 words.
Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justify inferences with evidence.

Summarise the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas.
Now read My Grandmother Knitting.
What are the similarities and differences between this poem and the one above? Which do you enjoy the most and why?
Choose one of the poems and learn it by heart before reciting to someone.
Make comparisons within and across books.

Learn a wider range of poetry by heart.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to https://www.pobble365.com/memories/
Describe the man you see in the picture. What do you think he is thinking about? What is he feeling?
Use the story starter on the page to write a story about George and a key event in his life. Use some dialogue within your story to demonstrate George’s character and move the action forward.

When you have finished your story read it through to check that your use of tense is consistent and correct throughout your story.
Draft and write by:
selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
in narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action.

Evaluate and edit by:
ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.
Imagine that you are George. You are finding it hard to live independently in your rambling old house and would like to become a Chelsea Pensioner. Write a letter of application detailing why you should be given this privilege. Talk about your army service and what you achieved and why you are now finding it difficult to stay where you are.

The letter will need to be written in a formal style so consider how that can be achieved for example not using contractions, use of the subjunctive form and the passive tense.

Click here for information about being a Chelsea Pensioner.
Plan writing by:
identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own.
Go to Spellingframe. Do some of the spelling tiles activities before taking the test.Spell words containing the letter-string ough.
Vocabulary, Punctuation and Grammar
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine that you are George. You are finding it hard to live independently in your rambling old house and would like to become a Chelsea Pensioner. Write a letter of application detailing why you should be given this privilege. Talk about your army service and what you achieved and why you are now finding it difficult to stay where you are.

The letter will need to be written in a formal style so consider how that can be achieved for example not using contractions, use of the subjunctive form and the passive tense.

Click here for information about being a Chelsea Pensioner.
Use the passive to affect the presentation of information in a sentence.

Use the difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are George and you have been called to an interview at The Chelsea Hospital. Ask someone in your household or someone you connect with online to interview you. You will need to justify why you should be given a place in the hospital.Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English.

Articulate and justify answers.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Measure your height to the nearest centimetre.
Convert this to inches, then to feet and inches.
Do this for other people in your home.
Solve problems involving the calculation and conversion of units of measure.
Measure the length of your humerus (the bone that runs between your elbow and your shoulder).
Measure the length of your radius (the bone that runs from your wrist to your elbow).
Measure the length of your tibia (the bone that runs between your ankle and your knee).
Record the length in centimetres in a chart or table.

Now take the measurement of other people in your house and put their measurements in the same chart or table.

Can you spot any patterns within the data? Are any of the bones similar lengths? Does the tallest person have the longest bones?
Solve problems involving the calculation and conversion of units of measure, using decimal notation up to three decimal places where appropriate.
Doctors can estimate a person’s height from just measuring their humerus – the long bone that runs between the elbow and shoulder.

For males, the formula is H = 73.66 + 3L, where H is the person’s height and L is the length of the humerus. This gives the height in centimetres.

For females, the formula is H = 65.02 + 3.1L.

How reliable is this formula? Test it out on people in your house.
Use simple formulae.
Here is a hypothesis:
Sports people are taller than pop stars.

What do you think?

Think of the names of ten pop stars and ten sports people. You might want to think of pop stars and sports people who are all male, or all female, or an even mix of both.

Use the internet to find out how tall these people are.
Decide on a way to present your data.

Does the information that you have found support or disprove the hypothesis?

What is the mean height of the people that you have chosen?
Calculate and interpret the mean as an average.

Interpret and construct graphs.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find out information about the human circulatory system from books or the internet. You could start by looking here.

Decide on a way to present the information that you find out about the circulatory system. It could be a poster, pamphlet, Powerpoint presentation, a labelled model – get creative!
Identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Sketch contrasting features within your families features.Pupils should be taught to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Pupils should be taught to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Research the Pop Art of Andy Warhol. Could you create a picture in the style of Andy Warhol using a photograph of your face?Pupils should be taught about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Research other portrait painters. Which do you like? Can you explain why?Pupils should be taught about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design an aid for a Chelsea pensioner. Consider what aspects of everyday life might be difficult for an older person. Talk to someone who is older to research this. Research what is already available.When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design
design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria

generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Evaluate
explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Use a globe or atlas to locate the features specified. Find a country which spans the Equator, a country which spans the Tropic of Capricorn, a country which spans the Tropic of Cancer and a country where part of it is within the Arctic Circle. Create a table showing the similarities and differences between the 4 countries – for example warmest / coldest month, most / least rainfall, longest / shortest day. Which of these countries would you most like to live in and why?Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night).
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Watch “Viking Eye for the Saxon Guy” from Horrible Histories:
How much of this do you think is really true?
Find out about how Vikings and Saxons kept their bodies clean.
You could start by looking at the “Hygiene and Beauty” and “Haircut and Beard” sections of this webpage.
Create an information leaflet on how to get that well-groomed Viking look.
Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Collins Connect and select teacher and sign in:
username - parents@harpercollins co.uk
password - Parents20!

Choose Musical Express, Lesson Bank, Year 5, Keeping Healthy, Body Popping Skeleton and do Activity 1 Step 1 and Activity 2.
Devise your own chant based on another part of the body. Combine the two chants into one piece of music.
Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.
Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Devise a simple, short, exercise routine to help you develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance. Follow the routine every day for at least 2 weeks.Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example, through athletics and gymnastics].

Book List - KS1

TitleCreator(s)Book ISBNeBook ISBN
Why Should I Brush my Teeth?

Why Should I Brush My Teeth
Katie Daynes &
Marta Alvarez Miguens
9781474968935
How does my Body Work?

How Does My Body Work
Charlotte Guillian97814062296539781406230536
All Kinds of Bodies

All Kinds of Bodies
Judith Heneghan9781445161105
Brilliant Body

Brilliant Body
Naray Yoon9781529002799
Using Your Senses

Using Your Senses
Rachel Rissman97814062289609781406230543
People who Help us:
Nurse

People Who Help Us: Nurse
Rebecca Hunter9781783880379
Princess Mirror-Belle and the Dragon Pox

Princess Mirror Belle and the Dragon Pox
Julia Donaldson & Lydia Monks9781509862658
Paddington Goes to Hospital

Paddington Goes to Hospital
Michael Bond
Itch Scritch Scratch

Itch Scritch Scratch
Eleanor Updale & Sarah Horne9781781122945
Healthy Foods

Healthy Foods
Anne Giulieri97814747300379781474730112
See Inside your Body

See Inside Your Body
Katie Daynes9780746070055

Book List - KS2

TitleCreator(s)Book ISBNeBook ISBN
The Great Big Brain Book

The Great Big Brain Book
Mary Hoffman &
Ros Asquith
9780711241534
DK Find Out! Human Body

DK Find Out: Human Body
DK97802412850779780241322611
or
9780241322895
Pig-Heart Boy

Pig Heart Boy
Malorie Blackman97805525516639781446453551
A Dangerous Game

A Dangerous Game
Malorie Blackman9781781128237
Wonder

Wonder
R J Palacio97805525659749781448119141
The Bubble Boy

The Bubble Boy
Stewart Foster97814711454079781471145414
George’s Marvellous Medicine

George's Marvellous Medicine
Roald Dahl97801413655039780141929859
See Inside your Body

See Inside Your Body
Katie Daynes9780746070055
Your Breathtaking Lungs and Rocking Respiratory System

Your Breathtaking Lungs and Rocking Respiratory System
Paul Mason9780750297400
Stickmen’s Guide to your Beating Heart

Stickmen's Guide to Your Beating Heart
John Farndon9781910684856
Super Stomach: and the Digestive System

Super Stomach and the Digestive System
Charlie Ogden9781912502301
100 Human Body Facts

100 Human Body Facts
Miles Kelly9781848107625