Resources for Teachers

These activities are intended for use by class teachers to support planning for home learning activities across the primary phase. Activities are linked to Early Learning Goals and National Curriculum objectives.

Class teachers will need to consider whether learners are familiar with the concepts needed to engage with these activities. Where this is not the case, they will need to provide opportunities for learners to encounter the necessary knowledge and skills.  For example, where an activity requires learners to construct a graph, teachers will need to provide opportunities for learners to engage with the concept to ensure they have the skills and knowledge required to complete the task.

Not every curriculum area is represented in every year group. Activities have been provided where there is a meaningful link to curriculum content for that year group.

Activities can be moved between year groups with modifications to suit the level of challenge that may be required.

EYFS

Communication and Language Development 
Learning Task
Listen to the book – Papa Please Get the Moon for Me
Retell the story in your own words.
What was your favourite part?
ELG 01 Listening and attention:
They listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions.

ELG 02 Understanding:
They answer ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events.
Go on a hunt for things which have ar in them – can you find a garden, car, card, star, chart, cardigan, bark (of a tree), farm animal (a toy one), scarf, jar, partner. Move in different ways to touch each one e.g. run, skip, hop, crawl. What other ar words can you find? Why not write a label for each object you have found?ELG 04 Moving and handling:
They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space.

ELG 10 Writing
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds.
Learn Climb Aboard the Spaceship and act it out as you say it.ELG 03 Speaking:
Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs.

ELG 04 Moving and handling:
Children show good control and co-ordination in large and small movements.
Physical Development 
Learning Task
Go on a hunt for things which have ar in them – can you find a garden, car, card, star, chart, cardigan, bark (of a tree), farm animal (a toy one), scarf, jar, partner. Move in different ways to touch each one e.g. run, skip, hop, crawl. What other ar words can you find? Why not write a label for each object you have found?ELG 04 Moving and handling:
They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space.

ELG 10 Writing
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds.
Go on a hunt for things which have ar in them – can you find a garden, car, card, star, chart, cardigan, bark (of a tree), farm animal (a toy one), scarf, jar, partner. Move in different ways to touch each one e.g. run, skip, hop, crawl. What other ar words can you find? Why not write a label for each object you have found?ELG 03 Speaking:
Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs.

ELG 04 Moving and handling:
Children show good control and co-ordination in large and small movements.
Learn Climb Aboard the Spaceship and act it out as you say it.ELG 03 Speaking:
Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs.

ELG 04 Moving and handling:
Children show good control and co-ordination in large and small movements.
Literacy Development 
Learning Task
Listen to the song – When You Wish Upon a Star (several versions on You Tube). What do you wish for? Ask someone to draw you a large star then write your wish on it – start your sentence with I wish …ELG 10 Writing:
They write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly, and others are phonetically plausible.
Read Phase 3 comic Moon Farm Park
Farm, park, star, card all have ar in them – have a go at reading and writing those words. Can you think of any words which rhyme with them? Try and write those too.
ELG 09 Reading:
Children read and understand simple sentences.
They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately.

ELG10 Writing:
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds.
Go on a hunt for things which have ar in them – can you find a garden, car, card, star, chart, cardigan, bark (of a tree), farm animal (a toy one), scarf, jar, partner. Move in different ways to touch each one e.g. run, skip, hop, crawl. What other ar words can you find? Why not write a label for each object you have found?ELG 04 Moving and handling:
They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space.

ELG 10 Writing
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds.
Mathematics 
Learning Task
Draw a basic alien. Vary the number of heads, arms, legs, eyes and ears. Add one more. Rub one out to show one less. Can your child count the body parts? Can they match the correct numbers? Can they write the number?ELG 11
Children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20, place them in order and say which number is one more or one less than a given number.
Draw an alien with two heads, six arms and three legs. Change the criteria. Get the child to decide the criteria. Did the adult draw it correctly, if not can they spot the mistake?ELG 11
Children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20, place them in order and say which number is one more or one less than a given number.
Build a rocket with Lego. Include a repeating pattern. Place some astronauts in the rocket. Can you now double the astronauts in the rocket?ELG 11
They solve problems, including doubling, halving and sharing.
ELG 12
They recognise, create and describe patterns.
Make a three-dimensional junk model rocket. Use some old boxes, paint and decorate it if you can. Name the shapes you have used; a cuboid, cube, cylinder, sphere.ELG 12
They explore characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language to describe them.
Talk about an astronaut’s day. Act out what he or she would be doing at different times of the day.
Make a clock outside. Write 1-12 on pebbles and use sticks for the arms of the clock.
ELG 12
Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems.
Understanding the World 
Learning Task
In 1969, the first people travelled to the Moon. Watch videos online like this with an adult. What can you find out about what happened?

Draw or paint a picture (or pictures) that shows the first people to go to the Moon. Write a sentence (or sentences) about what you now know.

Do you know someone who was alive in 1969 and who watched the Moon landing on television? Talk to them (on FaceTime maybe) about what they remember about that day.
ELG 13 People and Communities:
Children talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members.
Go outside and look at, feel and smell what is around you. Describe your favourite things out of what you see. Adult introduce words planet and Earth. Compare what you can see with this picture.ELG 14 The world: They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another.
Expressive Arts and Design 
Learning Task
Learn and sing Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.
Using anything you can find around the house create some ‘star’ music and actions to accompany the song.
ELG 16 Exploring and using media and materials:
Children sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them.
ELG 17 Being imaginative:
They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories.
Make some stars to stick on your ceiling with Blu Tac. Decide how you are going to decorate your stars. Pencils, crayons, collage, paint etc.ELG 16 Exploring and using media and materials:
They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.
Design and make an alien mask. How many eyes, ears antenna will you have?ELG 16 Exploring and using media and materials:
They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.
Build a spaceship or an alien out of old boxes and packaging. Decorate / paint your spaceship.ELG 16 Exploring and using media and materials:
They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.

Year 1

Reading 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read / listen to these stories on YouTube – there are several versions of them.
Aliens Love Underpants
The Mouse Who Ate the Moon
Choose one of the stories and retell it in your own words.
Explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them.
Read Which New Pet? Do you think they made a good choice?Read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught.
Writing 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write a story about something your alien does. Check your capital letters and full stops are in the correct place.Write sentences by:
Sequencing sentences to form short narratives.
Begin to punctuate sentences using a capital letter and a full stop, question mark or exclamation mark.
Find five objects which contain the ee phoneme as in feet and seat – look inside and outside. Can you find things where the /ee/ is spelt differently? Write labels for the objects you have found. Can you think of other words with the same spelling pattern?Spell: words containing each of the 40+ phonemes already taught.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write a story about something your alien does. Check your capital letters and full stops are in the correct place.Write sentences by:
Sequencing sentences to form short narratives.
Begin to punctuate sentences using a capital letter and a full stop, question mark or exclamation mark.
Watch episode one of The Clangers on You Tube. Now invent your own alien. What does he look like? What sounds does he make? Is he friendly or scary? Which adjectives best describe your alien?Expanded noun phrases for description and specification.
Mathematics 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Build a rocket with exactly 100 pieces of Lego. Check you have the right amount by counting in 10’s, 5’s and 2’s.

Draw an alien with various numbers of heads, arms, eyes and legs. Label with the correct numerals and number words.
Count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals; count in multiples of twos, fives and tens.

Read and write numbers from 1 to 20 in numerals and words.
Draw an alien using different shapes. Label the shapes you have used. Describe their properties. How many vertices and sides? Which shapes are symmetrical? Is your alien symmetrical?Identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line.
Make a cartoon strip for ‘The day in a life of an alien’. Add a clock in every picture to show what time it is. (o’clock /half past)Tell the time to the hour and half past the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.
Science 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are a space traveller from another planet who have landed on Earth. Your mission is to collect typical Earth objects. Collect objects from around your house that you think will tell people back on your planet about what it is like to live on Earth. Look at the materials that they are made from. Sort them by the different materials that they are made from. Describe what each material is like.Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.

Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock.

Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.

Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.
Talk to an adult about what the weather is like in each of the seasons and what happens to plants and animals in each season. Look on the internet to find some pictures of different seasons. Draw or paint a picture about each of the seasons and write a sentence or sentences about what happens in each of the seasons underneath each picture.
You could turn your pictures in to a calendar for either this year or, even better, for next year. https://www.calendar-12.com/printable_calendar/2021 has calendars that you could print out and stick to the bottom of your pictures.
Underneath each picture, write a sentence about the weather in that season.
No specific links to the NC for science in Year 2. However, under KS1 Geography:
Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom.
Watch the weather forecast with your child and discuss the weather. Write and act out a weather forecast for tomorrow’s weather. What might a weather forecast be like for a day in winter?
Observe the weather over a week and record the weather in a table, drawing or painting pictures to go with it. Collect rain water and measure it.
No specific links to the NC for science in Year 2. However, under KS1 Geography:
Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom.
Art and Design 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Aliens Love Underpants – Design some new underpants for an alien. Decorate your design using materials of your choice.Use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Watch an episode of The Clangers, available on BBC iPlayer, such as this one:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/b0956v5w/clangers.
Make a Clanger family using some playdoh or another modelling material.
Use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Watch an episode of The Clangers, available on BBC iPlayer, such as this one:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/b0956v5w/clangers.
Make the small world set for the Clangers.
Use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Design and construct your own alien model or picture.Use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Geography 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at a map of the world or a globe and identify where the land is and where the oceans are.

Find the United Kingdom and where you live. Can you find all the oceans?

Watch this short clip https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zjspyrd
What can’t be found on Venus but there is lots of on Earth?
Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans.

Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage.
History 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Here are the names of three famous astronauts:
Neil Armstrong, Tim Peake and Yuri Gargarin. What can you find out about them?

You could start by looking here:

- Yuri Gagarin
- Neil Armstrong
- Timothy Peake
- Welcome Back to Earth, Tim Peake!

Make a poster about the three astronauts.
Learn about the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.
Music 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to the music Mars from Holst’s The Planets and 2001 A Space Odyssey Theme available online. Which piece do you like the most and why?Listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music.

Year 2

Reading 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to The Great Moon Confusion on Charlotte’s Bedtime Stories –
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zsr9kmCvBA
Before you start, predict what the story might be about. What could the ‘moon confusion’ be? Stop the story from time to time and think about what might happen next.
Predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far.
Learn the poem Jump in the Rocket. Can you say it from memory to different people? You can do this using the telephone or computer.Continuing to build up a repertoire of poems learnt by heart.
Writing 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine what it would be like to be an astronaut and write a story about a trip to the moon. Tell us about your journey there, what it was like when you got there and how you got home again.Sequencing sentences to form short narratives.

Writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional).
Read What’s in Space then write a report on what you found out.Proof-reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation [for example, ends of sentences punctuated correctly].
Go to https://spellingframe.co.uk/spelling-rule/89/12-Adding-ed-ing-er-and-est-to-a-root-word-ending-in-y-with-a-consonant-before-it and play some of the games before taking the test.Adding –ed, –ing, –er and –est to a root word ending in –y with a consonant before it.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine that you are on the Moon – what can you see on the Moon itself and when you look back to Earth? Choose the adjectives you use carefully.Expanded noun phrases for description and specification [for example, the blue butterfly, plain flour, the man in the moon].
Mathematics 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Draw 5 aliens with 2 heads. How many heads in total?
Write 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 = 10 which can also be written as 5 lots of 2.
Draw 2 aliens with 5 heads. How many heads in total. Write 5 + 5 = 10

Discuss commutativity; that multiplication can be done in any order and you will get the same product. 5 x 2 = 10 2 x 5 = 10.
Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (×) and equals (=) signs.

Show that multiplication of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative).
Draw a 4 by 4 grid of planets. Place a two digit number on each planet.
Which two numbers are the closest to 100 when you add them?
Which is the largest total you can get if you subtract two numbers?
Add three numbers. Do this four times. Order your answers from the smallest to the largest total.
Simplify using a mixture of one and two digit numbers.
Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including:

  • a two-digit number and ones

  • a two-digit number and tens

  • two two-digit numbers

Make a rocket out of clean food packaging, that might have been recycled.
Label the boxes with the properties of the shapes.
Identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces.

Identify 2-D shapes on the surface of 3-D shapes, [for example, a circle on a cylinder and a triangle on a pyramid].
Make a cartoon strip for, ‘The day in a life of an alien’. Add a clock in every picture to show what time it is. (Write the time to the nearest 5 minutes including quarter past and quarter to).
Don’t forget there are 60 minutes in an hour and 24 hours in a day.
Tell and write the time to five minutes, including quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.

Know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day.
Science 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Take some seeds and germinate them – you could use the seeds from the inside of a tomato or a packet of seeds like cress.
When the seeds have germinated, place plants in different locations. Put some in full sunlight, put some in the shade, put some in a dark cupboard. Predict what will happen to each of these plants. Make sure the keep them watered (but not too much). Describe what happens to each of the plants and what this tells us about plants and light from the Sun.
Find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.
Art and Design 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are an astronaut. Draw the view from your spaceship window.Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Listen to the music Mars from Holst’s The Planets, 2001 A Space Odyssey Theme and Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata 1st Movement, all available online. How do they make you feel? Paint or draw a picture to show this. It could be just patterns or brush strokes.Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Design and Technology 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design a new astronaut suit. Label it with the key features.Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.

Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.
Geography 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at a map of the world or a globe and identify as many of the continents and oceans as you can.

Find the United Kingdom and point to England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Watch this short clip https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zy89wmn
What is the same about the moon and Earth and what is different?
Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans.

Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage.
History 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Here are the names of three famous astronauts:
Neil Armstrong, Tim Peake and Yuri Gargarin. What can you find out about them?

You could start by looking here:

- Yuri Gagarin
- Neil Armstrong
- Timothy Peake
- Welcome Back to Earth, Tim Peake!

Make a poster about the three astronauts.
Learn about the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.
Music 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to the music Mars from Holst’s The Planets, 2001 A Space Odyssey Theme and Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata 1st Movement, all available online. Can you identify the instruments which are playing? Which piece do you like the most and why?Listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music.

Year 3

Reading 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read Journey to Mars 7-9 years (you will need to sign up for this). When you have read each chapter can you summarise it using no more than twelve words?Identifying main ideas from more than one paragraph and summarising these.

Checking that the text make sense.
Writing 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Watch the film The Planets - you may want to focus on just two or three planets each day. After each clip write a sentence about what you saw – your sentence has to include an adjective and a noun, a verb and an adverb. Vary the structure of the sentences e.g. by sometimes starting with the adverb.Composing and rehearsing sentences orally progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.
When you have watched all the planet films from https://www.literacyshed.com/the-sci---fi-shed.html choose one of the planets and write a travel guide for it. How will you persuade people to visit it?Using simple organisational devices such as headings and subheadings.
Go to https://spellingframe.co.uk/spelling-rule/13/8-The-suffix-ly and play some of the activities for this list of words. Then take the test and see how you get on.The suffix –ly is added to an adjective to form an adverb.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are having a conversation with one of the aliens about life on their planet. What would you ask them – and what would they tell you?Use inverted commas for speech.
Go to https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/loopy-legends/en/ and create your own story. Choose your words carefully to make it as interesting as you can for the people you read it to.Reinforcement of work on word classes.
Mathematics 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
When Neil Armstrong stepped on the Moon, he left behind the first human footprint on the surface. Because there is no wind, it is still there. It is estimated to be 35cm long.
How much longer is this than your footprint?
How many of your footprints could you put toe to toe to go across your room? What about Neil Armstrong’s? What about other people in your house?
Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm).
On the Moon, gravity is six times lighter than on Earth, so you should be able to jump six times further. How far could you jump in the moon? (Note – you can actually jump more than six times further on the Moon as there is no resistance caused by the atmosphere.)Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm).
Find out the height of different rockets from the internet. How many of each type of space rocket could you place on top of each other to make a tower of rockets as close to 1,000 metres high as you can? Remember that you could build a rocket tower that is more than 1,000m and still be closer – 1,005m is close to 1,000m than 950m.Add and subtract numbers with up to three digits, using formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction.
Science 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
The Sun is our primary light source. Take objects outside or close to a window on a sunny day and draw around the shadows. See if others can identify the object from the shadow that you have drawn.Recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes.

Recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by an opaque object.

Find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change.
Create a sundial. Put a pencil in a lump of plasticine, or stick it in the ground. At nine o’clock, Place a piece of paper on the ground and draw a line along the shadow of the pencil. Do this every hour through the day. You will create a sundial. Label the hours using Roman numerals.Recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes.

Recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by an opaque object.

Find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change.
Art and Design 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Think about the story that you created at https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/loopy-legends/en/ Draw the illustrations for your story. Can you make a book for someone else to read?Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Create a piece of art work in response to the music for Jupiter from Holst‘s The Planets – on You Tube. Chose whichever medium you wish.Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Geography 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at a map of the world and identify the key mountain ranges, oceans and rivers.

Read the information on the planets on https://www.kids-world-travel-guide.com/solar-system.html

Which planets have rivers, mountains and / or volcanoes?
Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: rivers, mountains and volcanoes.
History 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Research the Moon landings of 1969. Use internet sources, videos and/or information books that you may have. Select key information and decide how you would like to present this. If you have access to Powerpoint or a similar programme, you could create a presentation using this.Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
Music 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
With the planet you have written a travel guide for in mind, compose some music for it using your voice and anything you have in your house and garden.Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music.
Listen to the music for Jupiter from Holst‘s The Planets – on You Tube. Did you enjoy the music? Why, why not?Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.

Year 4

Reading 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/menu/solar-system/ and click on one or more of the planets and read the information on it. Tell someone what you have learnt.Reading texts that are structured in different ways.

Retrieve record and present information from non-fiction.
Writing 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Watch the film Pandora. Make a list of 10 words or phrases which describe the planet and its inhabitants. Would you like to go there? Using those words write a description of the planet.Creating settings.
Composing and rehearsing sentences orally progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.
Create your own fact file about your planet. When you have finished, check that it makes sense and that the information is clear to your reader. Is punctuation used correctly?Evaluate and edit by assessing the effectiveness of their writing.
Go to https://spellingframe.co.uk/spelling-rule/12/7-The-suffix-ation and play some of the activities for this list of words. Then take the test and see how you get on.The suffix –ation is added to verbs to form nouns.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Create your own planet and write a detailed description of it and of its inhabitants. When you have done that, write an adventure story about when you travelled to the planet. Include a conversation you had with an alien you met when you were there.In narratives, creating settings, characters and plot.
Using and punctuating direct speech.
Mathematics 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Research the heights of the rockets used by the European Space Agency – the Ariane 1-6, Europa and Vega rockets. Where there is a range, use the largest measure. For example, if a rocket can be between 50 and 60m tall, take the value of 60m as the height. If you find an estimate, take that as the value. Create a bar chart to show the heights of these rockets. Decide on which scale would be best to use.Interpret and present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs.
Look at drawings of some of the constellations of stars. Images such as those at https://www.tes.com/lessons/ACYw7SKPH6j9zA/constellations could be used. Identify any shapes that are made when you create the constellations. Write the names of the shapes that you see on images of the constellations and list the properties of the shapes.

Look at the angles that are made in the drawings of the constellations. Identify the type of angle that is being made. Colour acute angles in one colour, obtuse in a different colour.
Use some dotty paper (examples can be found here https://nrich.maths.org/isometricpaper). Join up dots with straight lines to create some of your own constellations. Which shapes can you make? What are the angles that you make?
Compare and classify geometric shapes, including quadrilaterals and triangles, based on their properties and sizes
identify acute and obtuse angles.
565 people have been in to space (at 4th December 2019). Information can be found here about which countries that came from.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_space_travelers_by_name
Most have been American, Russian or Chinese.
Find out how many people have gone in to space from different European countries. Decide how best to present your data.
Interpret and present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs.

Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in bar charts, pictograms, tables and other graphs.
Find the maximum and minimum temperatures of the five inner rocky planets. Make sure that the values are in oC. Work out the difference between the maximum and minimum temperatures of each planet. Which planet has the greatest difference?

Work out how much hotter or colder different planets are by working out the difference between their minimum or maximum temperatures.

Hint – look here for some information.
Solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above and with increasingly large positive numbers.
Science 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Mix earth and water in to a thick mud. Freeze this in to lumps of different sizes to make meteors. Discuss why this solidifies. Weigh each meteor. In a sand tray (if you have one) or an area of earth in the garden, drop each meteor and measure across the crater that is left. Record the data on a table. What can you say about the relationship between the mass of the meteor and the size of the crater?Compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases.
Design and Technology 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and sew an alien. Use recycled materials, old buttons and unwanted pieces of clothing. Ask permission before you start cutting!Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.

Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.
Geography 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at a map of the UK and identify the key hill / mountain ranges, rivers and surrounding seas.

Read the information on the planets on https://www.kids-world-travel-guide.com/solar-system.html

Which, if any, of the planets have similar physical features to the UK?
Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers).
History 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Research the Moon landings of 1969. Use internet sources, videos and/or information books that you may have. Select key information and decide how you would like to present this. If you have access to PowerPoint or a similar programme, you could create a presentation using this.Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
Music 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
With the planet you have created (see English section) in mind, compose some music for your planet using your voice and anything you have in your house and garden.Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music.
Listen to the music for Jupiter and Venue from Holst‘s The Planets – on You Tube. Think of 2 ways in which they are the same and 2 ways in which they are different.Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.

Year 5

Reading 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Research information about Orion the Hunter, a constellation of stars. https://littleastronomy.com/orion-constellation-for-kids-facts-myth-and-pictures/ and http://www.astronomytrek.com/step-4-interesting-facts-about-orion/ are possible starting points. On a clear night go outside and look for Orion in the sky – finding his belt is a good way to locate him.Check that the text makes sense.

Retrieve record and present information from non-fiction.
Read Mythical Beasts and Fabulous Creatures on https://www.oxfordowl.co.uk/for-home/find-a-book/library-page/ - aged 9-11. You will need to sign in to access this. Choose two of the stories and identify two things they have in common and two ways in which they are different.Increase familiarity with a wide range of texts including myths and legends.
Writing 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Create your own constellation, draw it, name it and write your own legend about the character who inspired it.In narratives describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action.
Create your own Orion Factfile.Using further organisational devices to structure text and to guide the reader (for example headings, bullet points, underlining).
Play https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sign-here/en/# - read each word aloud before you type it. How many points can you score?Consolidate rules and patterns for spelling.
Go to https://spellingframe.co.uk/spelling-rule/38/45-Words-with-the-sound-spelt-ei-after-c and play some of the activities for this list of words. Then take the test and see how you get on.Words with the /i:/ sound spelt ei after c.
English 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
You may also enjoy listening to The Boy Who Made the World Disappear.
Mathematics 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Here is a statement - The taller the space rocket, the heavier it will be.
Research the heights and masses of the rockets used by the European Space Agency – the Ariane 1-6, Europa and Vega rockets. Find their heights and their masses. Where there is a range, use the largest measure. For example, if a rocket can be between 50 and 60m tall, take the value of 60m. If you find an estimate, take that as the value.
Create a table or a graph to show this information. Is the statement true or not based on the information that you have found out?
Complete, read and interpret information in tables, including timetables.
Find some pictures of astronauts (like the ones at https://www.pexels.com/search/Astronaut/). On top of them, draw straight lines to create a stick figure, like this…

Estimate and measure the angles that are created within your stick figure.
Know angles are measured in degrees: estimate and compare acute, obtuse and reflex angles.

Draw given angles, and measure them in degrees (o)
identify:

  • angles at a point and one whole turn (total 360o)

  • angles at a point on a straight line (total 180o)

  • other multiples of 90o

How long?
The Apollo 11 rocket travelled at 11km every second. How far did it travel in a minute? How far in an hour? How far in a day?
Solve problems involving multiplication and division.
Science 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Create a fact file on each of the planets of the solar system using secondary sources of information (books, websites). Include important information about each of the planets of the solar system (e.g. size, distance from the Sun, number of moons, composition of the atmosphere), as well as other interesting facts that relate to each planet (e.g. that the largest volcano in the solar system is on Mars).Describe the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system.
Build a model using different sized balls and string to show how the Earth and the Moon move about the Sun. Then create a labelled diagram to show this. Include information about how long it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun, and how long it takes the Moon to orbit the Earth.Describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth.

Describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies.

Use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.
Identify key words linked to the movement of the solar system. Create a glossary to explain the terms. Words to include, for example, could be equinox, hemisphere, orbit, rotate…Describe the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system.

Describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth.

Describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies.

Use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.
Find out about what causes the seasons. You could begin by looking at these videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tX3Y5bzNDiU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgHmqv_-UbQ

Create an information poster, a Powerpoint presentation, or a video to explain why seasons occur.
Describe the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system.
Look at the Moon every evening. Record how much of the Moon is in shadow. Record this over a month.

Explore why this happens using videos such as:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCweccNOaqo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQwvHn_qkBA

Create a diagram to explain what is happening.
Describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth.
Design and Technology 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Make an alien with moving joints. For an idea of how you could do this, look at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71NML8I5L2M or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5B_nsjwZe4Understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages]
Geography 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Choose one of the continents of the world and identify the key physical features such as mountain ranges, climate and rivers.

Using information from https://www.kids-world-travel-guide.com/solar-system.html and https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zdrrd2p/articles/ztsdj6f
Compare the physical features of your continent with one of the rocky planets. Present what you have discovered in a chart.
Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.
History 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
After the Second World War, The USA and USSR competed with each other to prove that they were the most powerful nation on Earth. As part of this, both nations tried to show that they had the best technology and science by racing to put people in to space. Research key dates and events of the space race. Create the text for an information book / web page about the space race. You could create a timeline to show key events. You might also be able to share information and with others using FaceTime or emails.Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
Music 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to The Planets by Holst – available online. Which planet’s music do you like the most and why?Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.

Year 6

Reading 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read Voyagers to the Stars https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/voyager-to-stars/en/ . Record six facts you have learnt.Check that the text makes sense discussing their understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context.
Retrieve record and present information from non-fiction.
Writing 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Have a go at the challenge from the right hand side of the page you have just read - What if you had been on Carl Sagan's Golden Record team? How would you do a "show and tell" about Earth? Identify the audience and purpose for the writing, selecting the appropriate form.

Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning.
Go to https://spellingframe.co.uk/spelling-rule/38/45-Words-with-the-sound-spelt-ei-after-c and play some of the activities for this list of words. Then take the test and see how you get on.Endings which are spelt –cious or –tious.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are on a space mission. Write a diary recording what you do, say and feel each day starting with the day before you launched into space.Use devices to build cohesion within a paragraph.

Link ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time.
English 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
You may also enjoy listening to The Boy Who Made the World Disappear.
Mathematics 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Only twelve astronauts have walked on the Moon. Find out who they are and calculate their mean age in years when they went to the Moon.Calculate and interpret the mean as an average.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_space_travelers_by_nationality lists out the number of people who have been in space by nationality. Create a pie chart or bar graph to show this information. You may want to show countries that have sent many people in to space separately, and clump countries together which have sent fewer together to make it easier to construct.Interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems.
Create nets from paper or card for cylinders, cones, pyramids, cubes, cuboids. Use these to create models of the Apollo rockets or the International Space Station. Use the internet to find images of these.
Design and build your own rockets and spaceships using nets to make three-dimensional shapes. On your shapes, write the dimensions of the shapes that you use.
Recognise, describe and build simple 3-D shapes, including making nets.
Create images of the different planets of the solar system that are scaled accurately. Find out the diameter of each planet. Use a scale of 1cm = 2,000km to create circles to represent them. Use objects to draw around that are about the right size, or use this method to draw circles:
https://www.wikihow.com/Draw-a-Perfect-Circle-Using-a-Pin
Label each with the diameter in kilometres and also in miles. Also label them with their distance from the Sun in kilometres and in miles.
Have some fun colouring them to look like the real planets – chalks or water colour paints work really well of you have them.
Illustrate and name parts of circles, including radius, diameter and circumference and know that the diameter is twice the radius.

Convert between miles and kilometres.
Neptune takes 165 Earth years to orbit the Sun. That’s 60,226 Earth days (including extra days from leap years).

Find out how long it takes the other planets to orbit the Sun.

Find out how many times the other planets orbit the Sun in that time. You may need to decide how many decimal places you are going to give your answers in, or whether you are going to round to the nearest complete orbit.
Solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

Use estimation to check answers to calculations and determine, in the context of a problem, an appropriate degree of accuracy.
Science 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Explain an Eclipse.
Light travels in a straight line. Use this information to explain what happens during an eclipse. Research on the internet or in books to help you explain. Build a model or create an information poster to explain eclipses.
Recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines.

Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye.

Explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes.
Art and Design 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Keep a sketch book. Sketch patterns or textures on objects or materials around your home.Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.
Research an artist who focuses on space. Recreate a picture in the style of this artist. You could find out about the following people:
Albrecht Durer (1471 – 1528) – Map of the Northern Sky and Map of the Southern Sky
Etienne Leopold Trouvelot (1827 – 1895) – Astronomical Drawings
Vincent Van Gogh (1853 – 1890) – The Starry Night
Lucien Rudaux (1874 – 1947) – In Other Worlds, Dangers of Space, or Mars
Learn about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Design and Technology 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design a healthy day of meals for an astronaut. Make one of your savoury meals. Improve your recipe.Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including ingredients.

Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet.

Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.
Geography 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Choose one of the continents of the world and identify the key physical features such as mountain ranges, climate and rivers.

Using information from https://www.kids-world-travel-guide.com/solar-system.html and https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zdrrd2p/articles/ztsdj6f
Compare the physical features of your continent with the other rocky planets. Create a chart showing the similarities and differences.
Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.
History 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
After the Second World War, the USA and USSR competed with each other to prove that they were the most powerful nation on Earth. As part of this, both nations tried to show that they had the best technology and science by racing to put people in to space. Research key dates and events of the space race. Create the text for an information book / web page about the Space Race. You could create a timeline to show key events. You might also be able to share information and with others using FaceTime or emails.Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
Music 
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to The Planets by Holst – available online. Which planet’s music do you like the most and why? Can you identify the percussion instruments which are used?Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.

Book List - KS1

Following available on eBooks

TitleAuthorIllustratorISBN
The Sea of Tranquility

Mark HaddonChristian Birmingham9780008343101
Meet the Planets

Meet the Planets
Caryl HartBethan Woollvin9781408893005
Toys in Space

Mini GreyMini Grey9781446479094
Rocket Says Look Up!

Rocket Says Look Up
Nathan ByronDapo Adeola9780241345863
You Choose in Space

You Choose in Space
Pippa GoodhartNick Sharratt9780141379401
Usborne Beginner’s: The Solar System

Usborne Beginner's: The Solar System
Emily BoneTerry Pastor9781474905220

Available Audio books

TitleAuthorNarratorISBN
The Dinosaur that Pooped a Planet!

The Dinosaur that Pooped a Planet!
Tom FletcherDougie Poynter and Tom Fletcher9781448197019
Goodnight Spaceman

Goodnight Spaceman
Michelle RobinsonTim Peake9780141378633
The Sea of Tranquillity

The Sea of Tranquillity
Mark HaddonAnthony Head9780007547647
The Way Back Home

The Way Back Home
Oliver JeffersPaul McGann9780007571277

Book List - Lower KS2

Following available on eBooks

TitleAuthorIllustratorISBN
Cakes in Space

Cakes in Space
Philip ReeveSarah McIntyre9780192734914
100 Facts Exploring Space

Miles KellyN/A9781782092254
Moon Landings

Moon Landings
Shoshana Weider9780241395714
Aliens Stink!

Aliens Stink
Steve ColeJim Field9780857078735
Attack of the Alien Dung

Attack of the Alien Dung
Gareth P JonesSteve May9781847158499

Book List - Upper KS2

Following available on eBooks

TitleAuthorISBN
The Kid who Came from Space

The Kid Who Came from Space
Ross Welford9780008333799
The Jamie Drake Equation

The Jamie Drake Equation
Christopher Edge9780857638397
George's Secret Key to the Universe

Georges Secret Key to the Universe
Lucy Hawking and Stephen Hawking9781407047843
A Galaxy of Her Own: Amazing Stories of Women in Space

A Galaxy of Her Own - Amazing Stories of Women in Space
Libby Jackson9781473553262
DK Find Out! Solar System

DK Find Out Solar System
Sarah Cruddas9780241282410
Orion Lost

Orion Lost
Alistair Chrisholm9781788005937
The Wrong Side of the Galaxy

The Wrong Side of the Galaxy
Jamie Thomson9781408330296

Available Audio books

TitleAuthorNarratorISBN
The Kid who Came from Space

The Kid Who Came from Space
Ross WelfordSarah Ovens and Chris Coxen9780008333805

See Also: