Resources for Teachers

These activities are intended for use by class teachers to support planning for home learning activities across the primary phase. Activities are linked to Early Learning Goals and National Curriculum objectives.

Class teachers will need to consider whether learners are familiar with the concepts needed to engage with these activities. Where this is not the case, they will need to provide opportunities for learners to encounter the necessary knowledge and skills.  For example, where an activity requires learners to construct a graph, teachers will need to provide opportunities for learners to engage with the concept to ensure they have the skills and knowledge required to complete the task.

Not every curriculum area is represented in every year group. Activities have been provided where there is a meaningful link to curriculum content for that year group.

Activities can be moved between year groups with modifications to suit the level of challenge that may be required.

EYFS

Communication and Language
[Listening & Attention, Understanding & Speaking]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Watch and listen to:
The Shopping Basket – John Burningham
The Jolly Postman – Allan Alberg

Pupils to:
• Create a role play area - design and create a shop or post office role play area/table with the children. Encourage them to think about the resources they will need, where to find them and how to organise them.

• Sequence the stories -verbally sequence the story with your props and resources.

• Recognise the repetitive phrases - encourage the pupils to say the repetitive phrases within the stories.

• Retell a known story - can they retell the story independently using their props and resources?

• Extend their vocabulary - teach and model ambitious vocabulary linked to the texts. Link this to current phonic knowledge and further text level work.
40-60 months - Use language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences in play situations. Introduce a story line or narrative into their play.

ELG 01- Listening and attention:
Children listen attentively in a range of situations. They listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions. They give their attention to what others say and respond appropriately, while engaged in another activity.

ELG 02 Understanding:
Children follow instructions involving several ideas or actions • They answer ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events

ELG03 – Speaking:
Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. They use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are to happen in the future. They develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.
Physical Development
[Moving & Handling, Health & Self Care]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Pupils to:
• Build the role play area - ensure there are opportunities for fine motor skills to be developed e.g. pencils, crayons and pens for list making. The children should select the resources that they want for fine motor work. Allow the pupils to set up the outdoor area with the destinations for the Jolly Postman’s route.

• Follow routes - play follow my leader games to model the route the postman may have taken. Demonstrate how children could move along the route in different ways.

• Design their own routes - allow the pupils to make their own routes by travelling under, over, through, around, on top of etc.

• Understand how to keep safe - children to consider how they should construct the course safely and move through it with care.

• Develop the use of small movements - sing action rhymes – encourage the use of small movements to accompany. Build up a repertoire of action songs.

40-60 months – Travels with confidence and skill around, under, over and through balancing and climbing equipment.

40-60 months – Practises some appropriate safety measures without direct supervision.

ELG04 – Moving and handling:
Children show good control and co‑ordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment and tools effectively, including pencils for writing.

ELG 05 - Health and self-care:
Children know the importance for good health of physical exercise and a healthy diet, and talk about ways to keep healthy and safe.

They manage their own basic hygiene and personal needs successfully, including dressing and going to the toilet independently.
Personal, Social & Emotional Development
[Self Confidence & Self Awareness, Managing Feelings & Behaviour, Making Relationships]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Work collaboratively with others - children set up the role play areas collaboratively and cooperate with one another.

Speak confidently about their personal experiences - children to share their own journeys. Where did they go and how did they travel? How did they feel at different points in their journey? Where would they like to go?

Work as a pair and following instructions -
1. On a grassy flat area, design a track using cones and skipping ropes. Can one child cover their eyes and the other give them instructions to follow the route safely?
2. Pupils plan a journey around the school grounds. They write some instructions for the route. Can they give clear instructions to someone else to complete the journey?
ELG06 – Self-confidence and self-awareness:
Children are confident to try new activities and say why they like some activities more than others. They are confident to speak in a familiar group, will talk about their ideas, and will choose the resources they need for their chosen activities. They say when they do or don’t need help.

ELG07 – Managing feelings and behaviour:
Children talk about how they and others show feelings, talk about their own and others’ behaviour, and its consequences, and know that some behaviour is unacceptable. They work as part of a group or class and understand and follow the rules. They adjust their behaviour to different situations and take changes of routine in their stride.

ELG08 – Making relationships:
Children play co-operatively, taking turns with others.
They take account of one another’s ideas about how to organise their activity.
They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings, and form positive relationships with adults and other children.
Literacy
[Reading & Writing]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Recommended texts linked to journeys
Pupils could explore the following texts:
1. Mr Gumpy’s Outing - John Burningham
2. Mr Gumpy’s Motor Car - John Burningham
3. The Shopping Basket – John Burningham
4. On the Way Home – Jill Murphy
5. The Journey Home from Grandpa’s – Jemima Lumley
6. Naughty Bus – Jan Oke
7. Mrs Armitage on Wheels – Quentin Blake
8. Journey – Aaron Baker
9. The 100 Decker Bus – Mike Smith
10. Giraffe on a Bicycle – Julia Wolf
11. The Jolly Postman – Allan Alberg

The Shopping Basket
Pupils to:
• Practise their phoneme knowledge - 'Steven had eggs, bananas, apples, oranges, doughnuts and crisps on his shopping list. Eggs begins with an ‘e’. How many other foods begin with the letter ‘e’? Repeat this for Steven’s other foods on his list.

• Write their own shopping lists - if they could only choose six items what would they be?

• Create a speech bubble - write speech bubbles for Steven and the bear as he buys the food to take home.

• Read, write and follow instructions - on a grassy flat area, pupils design a track using cones and skipping ropes. They write some instructions for a walking route. Can one child cover their eyes and the other give them instructions to follow the route?

The Jolly Postman
Pupils to:
• Write a letter - write a letter to someone that you haven’t seen for a while. Don’t forget to write the address on the letter. Walk to your nearest post box to send it on its way. Now choose one of the characters in the book and write a letter to them.

• Write a descriptive sentence with the correct punctuation - think about your route to school and notice the landmarks that you pass. You could go for a walk and capture these on a photograph. Can you write a sentence to describe each landmark?

• Identify letter names and phonemes - pupils to look at car registration plates. Can they identify the letter names and phonemes?
ELG09 – Reading:
Children read and understand simple sentences. They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words. They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.

ELG10 – Writing:
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds. They also write some irregular common words. They write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly, and others are phonetically plausible.
Mathematics
[Numbers / Shape Space & Measures]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
The Shopping Basket
Pupils to:
• Calculate the total number of foods bought - Steven had 6 eggs, 5 bananas, 4 apples, 3 oranges, 2 doughnuts and 1 packet of crisps on his shopping list. Pupils represent these with playdoh. Can they calculate how many objects Steven bought in total?

• Compare weights - place apples and oranges in two bags. Which is the heavier/lighter one? Can you add more fruit and compare again? Place some items in three bags, can they be ordered from the lightest to the heaviest?

• Use real money in the role play area - can the pupils recognise all the coins? Practise making different amounts using 1p, 2p, 5p and 10p within the shop or post office. Calculate double 3p, 6p, 9p using pennies.

• Solve simple practical problems - Steven had 6 eggs, 5 bananas, 4 apples, 3 oranges, 2 doughnuts and 1 packet of crisps. Pupils to solve problems such as if Steven has 6 eggs and 5 bananas how many objects does he have now? If Steven had 6 eggs and he cooks 4, how many will he have left?

The Jolly Postman
Pupils to:
• Use positional and directional language - describe routes.

• Use the language of shape - describe the landmarks they see on their route to school. Can they use the language of shape to describe them?

• Recognise and form numbers correctly - look at car registration plates, can they identify the numbers? Can they form these numbers correctly? Can they create their own registration plates?

• Solve simple number problems - pupils use some small cars to make a car park. Can they calculate how many wheels are in the car park. If 2 cars leave the car park how many wheels are there now?
ELG11 – Numbers:
Children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20, place them in order and say which number is one more or one less than a given number. Using quantities and objects, they add and subtract two single-digit numbers and count on or back to find the answer. They solve problems, including doubling, halving and sharing.

ELG12 – Shape, space and measures:
Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems. They recognise, create and describe patterns. They explore characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language
to describe them.
Understanding the World
[People & Communities, The World, Technology]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Constructing maps
Pupils to:
• Construct a map - make a map of the Jolly Postman’s route. This could be drawn or constructed with small world and construction materials.

• Programme a Bee Bot - pupils to programme the Bee Bots to follow the route and carry the Jolly Postman’s letters.

• Identify significant landmarks - repeat this task for drawing a route from home to school. What landmarks and places do the pupils pass? Can pupils programme the Bee Bot to travel the route?

Design and make a boat that floats
Pupils to:
• Explore objects and materials that float and sink - consider what you could use to make a boat that will stay afloat.
• Design and build a boat and test it on the water.
• Test their design - try out several boat designs to see which works best.

The Great Wave off Kanagawa, Katsushika Hokusai
Pupils to:
• Recreate ‘The Great Wave’ - use a mixture of paint, PVA glue and flour to create texture and shine. Think about the colours and the shape of the brush strokes.

Seascape near Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer : Vincent van Gogh 1888
Pupils to:
• Compare this picture to ‘The Great Wave’, how is it the same/different?
• Imagine where the boats are going, how might the people on the boats be feeling?
• Recreate a picture in the style of Van Gogh
ELG 14 - The World:
Children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things.
They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another.
They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur, and talk about changes.

ELG15 – Technology:
Children recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools. They select and use technology for particular purposes.

ELG 17 - Being imaginative:
They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories.
Expressive Arts & Design
[Exploring and using Media and Materials, Being Imaginative]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Rhymes and songs
Pupils to:
Listen to the songs and rhymes
Choose your favourite song and explore a range of instruments to accompany it.

• Explore a range of music styles and explore how the pupils could move to the music -
1. Watch this clip of Villa-Lobos 'Little Train of the Caipira', listen to the music, how could you move to this?
2. Listen to Orinoco Flow – Enya - this piece of music could be another stimulus for colour mixing different shades that might be seen during a journey down a river.

• Design and make your own instruments using junk modelling - can you make a musical instrument out of the junk and use it to accompany the songs and dance?

• Create a junk model - pupils to choose the modes of transport that they would like to recreate e.g. a bus, car, boat, train etc.

ELG16 – Exploring and using media and materials:
Children sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them. They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.

ELG 17 - Being imaginative:
Children use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about uses and purposes. They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories.

Year 1

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read Mr Gumpy's Motor Car
What do think is going to happen when the car gets stuck – are you right? Can you remember who went out in the car with Mr Gumpy? Do you think they enjoyed their day out? Retell the story to someone in your own words.

If you enjoyed the story you might like to listen to Mr Gumpy’s Outing also available on YouTube. What do you think will happen when all the animals get into the boat - are you right? Which characters appear in both stories?
Become very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, retelling them and considering their particular characteristics.

Predict what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far.
Go to Phonics Play Comics
Read the story a couple of times until you can read it really fluently. You could try reading it with someone else – one of you take the part of Red and the other Green. Do you think Red enjoyed his holiday – why / why not?
Read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words.

Re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading.
Go to Phonics Play
Read the text and identify as many ee graphemes as you can then check to see if you are correct. Complete the other activities for ee.
Read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write about a journey you have been on – did you go by car, bus, train, plane or some other way? Why did you go on the journey – was it a holiday or for some other reason. What was the best / worst thing about the journey? When you have finished your writing check that it makes sense and that the words you have used are spelt correctly. Don’t forget to use a capital letter every time you write the word I.Sequence sentences to form short narratives.

Re-read what they have written to check that it makes sense.

Segment spoken words into sounds and write the letters to those corresponding sounds.
Choose one of the pictures from Mr Gumpy’s Motor Car. Write a few sentences describing what you can see. Join some of your words and sentences together using and.

Make sure you have spaces between each of your words and that letters are written correctly. Practise those you think could be neater.
Join words and join clauses using and.
Separate words with spaces.
Understand which letters belong to which handwriting ‘families’ (i.e. letters that are formed in similar ways) and practise these.
In the book Mr Gumpy’s Motor Car it says: They pushed and shoved and heaved and strained and gasped and slipped and slithered and squelched. In many of these words ed has been added to the root word to indicate the use of the past tense – the other words are less straightforward. What would these words be in the past tense – help, rush, clean, wink and test?Using the prefix un–; use –ing, –ed, –er and –est where no change is needed in the spelling of root words.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write about a journey you have been on – did you go by car, bus, train, plane or some other way? Why did you go on the journey – was it a holiday or for some other reason. What was the best / worst thing about the journey? When you have finished your writing check that it makes sense and that the words you have used are spelt correctly. Don’t forget to use a capital letter every time you write the word I.Use capital letters for names and for the personal pronoun I.
Choose one of the pictures from Mr Gumpy’s Motor Car and write a few sentences describing what you can see.Join words and join clauses using and.
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Choose one of the characters from the Mr Gumpy story and act out the story as though you were that character. Think about the way you might move and how you might talk. Now do the same thing with another character from the story.Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates.
Imagine you are talking to Christopher Columbus (see Geography below). Can you think of three questions you would like to ask him?Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Traffic Count
Talk to pupils about road safety and the importance of finding a safe place to carry out this task.
Discuss what they want to find out, pupils to decide on their own lines of enquiry.
They could count:
• the total number of vehicles passing
• the number of each type of vehicle e.g. cars, vans, lorries, buses
• the different colours of vehicles.

Pupils to plan and record their findings on a tally chart.
Then make a bar chart to show their findings.
Pupils interpret their data and make some conclusions.
No statutory requirement for data handling in Year 1.
Car Registration Plates
• Pupils to look at car registration plates. What numbers can they see?
• What is the total number if they add the numbers together. Using just the numbers on the registration what is the biggest number they can make?
• Can they count up to this number from 0? Can they count back from this number?
• What is 1 more or less than this number?
• Can they write down some numbers that are less than/ more than their number?
• Can they write this number as a word?
• Can they calculate how many tens and ones does the number has? Can they use the Numicon or Base 10 to show this?
• Can they double the number, what number do they have now?
Count to and across 100, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number.

Count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals; count in multiples of twos, fives and tens.

Given a number, identify one more and one less.

Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most, least.

Read and write numbers from 1 to 20 in numerals and words.
Numbers of wheels
Unicyles have one wheel, bicycles have two wheels and tricycles have three wheels.

Pupils to solve simple problems related to different scenarios.
For example:
• There were 5 bicycles parked up. How many wheels?
• There were 6 bicycles and three tricycles parked up. How may wheels?
• There were 4 bicycles, 1 tricycle and 2 unicycles. How many wheels?
• There were 10 bicycles in a school bike park. 6 bicycles were taken home. How many bicycles were left? How many wheels were left?

Can the pupils draw a picture and write a mathematical statement for the problem?
Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (–) and equals (=) signs.

Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20.

Add and subtract one-digit and two-digit numbers to 20, including zero.

Solve one-step problems that involve addition and subtraction (and the symbols +, -, =) using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems.

Solve one-step problems involving multiplication and division, by calculating the answer using concrete objects, pictorial representations and arrays with the support of the teacher.
Shape Hunt
• Look at a variety of different vehicles, cars, buses motorbikes etc. Pupils to name the shapes they can see and describe their properties.

Designing a vehicle or boat
• Within Design and Technology pupils have been asked to build a vehicle or boat. If using junk modelling can they describe the properties of the three dimensional shapes?
Recognise and name common 2-D and 3-D shapes, including:
• 2-D shapes [for example, rectangles (including squares), circles and triangles].
• 3-D shapes [for example, cuboids (including cubes), pyramids and spheres].
Journey Times
• Discuss what time pupils leave their house for school.
• Pupils to time themselves to see how long it takes to walk or drive to school.
• Discuss the longest journey that pupils have undertaken.

Share journey start and finish times – can the pupils demonstrate this on a clock for o’clock and half past?
Tell the time to the hour and half past the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Make parachutes for a small toy figure. If you can’t find a small toy figure, use a small stone / lump of plasticine / something similar as the weight on the end of a parachute. You could decorate the stone with a face if you’d like to.

Take a tissue and stick four lengths of thread or thin string on the corners with Sellotape.
Homemade-Parachute

Stick the other four corners to the toy figure with Sellotape.
Homemade-Parachute

Drop the parachute to the floor to see how well the parachute works. It works best if you can drop it from a window, from the top of some stairs, or if you can climb a step ladder. Make sure that an adult is around with you if you go up high.
Homemade-Parachute

Now try some different materials to make parachutes. You could use a piece cut from a plastic bag, a piece of heavier paper, some fabric – whatever you can find.

Try to cut the materials so that they are all the same size.
Which materials work best for a parachute?
Talk about your ideas with an adult.

Observe closely, using simple equipment.

Perform simple tests.

Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Observational drawings of wheels
• With permission look closely at some wheels on a car, bicycle or scooter.
• Make a very careful drawing of all parts of the wheels. Make sure you capture all the fine detail.
• Consider using pencil or a fine black pen to capture the detail.
Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
Bicycles in times gone by
• Research what bicycles looked like in the past. The following links will help you:
The Evolution of the Bicycle
The Bicycle: Great inventions that changed history

• Draw careful drawings of bicycles in the past, maybe a tricycle.
Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
Explore the work of Quentin Blake
Mrs Armitage Queen of the Road by Quentin Blake - Listen to ‘Mrs Armitage Queen of the Road’ and look closely at how the illustrations have been drawn. Note the black outline around all of the characters.
• You could use extracts from the clips below where Quentin Blake explains his drawing process:
10 Minutes of Illustration Part 1
10 Minutes of Illustration Part 2

• Draw a picture of a vehicle in the style of Quentin Blake.

Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and make a moving vehicle with wheels
• Look at a range of wheeled vehicles and observe their different features.
• Look closely at toy vehicles with wheels and how they work. Identify the axle.
• Pupils to design a new vehicle for the 21st Century, drawing a detailed plan with labels. What features and luxuries would you like your vehicle to have?
• Pupils to consider their safety when cutting etc.
• Make and decorate your vehicle.
• Evaluate how it works. What improvements could be made?

Design
• Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
• Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make
• Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
• Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Evaluate
• Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
• Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.

Design and make a raft or boat
• Look at a range of rafts or boats and observe their different features.
• Consider materials that would be good for making a raft or boat? Are they waterproof and buoyant?
• Design your own raft or boat? Make a detailed, labelled drawing.
• Now make a prototype. Test it on some water. Consider how you could improve it.
• Build a second prototype. Is it better? Which floats better? Test to see which can carry the most weight. Remember to make it a fair test!
• Pupils to consider their safety when cutting materials etc.
Design
• Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
• Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make
• Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
• Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Evaluate
• Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
• Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Christopher Columbus was a very famous explorer – find out about him here

He sailed from Spain to the Americas, although his aim was to get to China without sailing all the way around Africa. Can you find North America, South America and Africa on a map of the world? Which continents are Spain and China in? Which ocean did Columbus cross to get to the Americas? If he had sailed from the Americas to China which ocean would he have had to cross?
Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans.
When going on holiday many people choose to go to the seaside. Can you locate some popular seaside towns in the UK, for example:
• Brighton
• Torquay
• Llandudno
• Blackpool
• Oban
• Scarborough
• Clacton
• Southend-on-Sea

Have you been to any of these places?

Describe a beach, cliff, coast, sea and ocean.
Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:
beach, cliff, coast, sea, ocean.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Here are the names of some people who have undertaken famous journeys in the past:
• Christopher Columbus
• Jebediah Smith
• Amelia Earhart
• Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay
• Marco Polo
• Gertrude Bell
• Zheng He
• Sacagawea


Find out about the journeys that some of these people made and why they are famous.

You could start looking here:
Christopher Columbus

Jebediah Smith

Amelia Earhart

Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay

Marco Polo

Gertrude Bell

Zheng He

Sacagawea

When you have found out about them, write a few sentences to explain why they are famous. Include information about where they were from, when they went on their journey, and why they are famous.
Learn about the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to BBC Teach Music and sing along to the 3 songs about travel. Which song is your favourite?Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Pretend to be a car, a train, a bicycle, a rocket, a bus, and a ship. How will you move around? What will it look like when you stop – can you hold your stop position for a few seconds? Now combine some of those movements into a short dance.Perform dances using simple movement patterns.
Master basic movements including running, jumping, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities.

Year 2

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read A River by Marc Martin and listen to the story of the journey of the river. Then turn down the volume and read it through for yourself – it will be easier to read if it is in full screen mode. Do you think the girl really sailed down the river – why /why not?

Do you know the meaning of the words horizon, patchwork quilt, gibbons and mangroves? If not find out by asking an adult or looking the word up in a dictionary.

In the story the girl tells us what she sees, hears, feels and smells. Make a list of those things and the sense she uses for each.

How many different words for look does the author use? Can you think of any other words which mean look? What might a quick look be called, and a long look?

There are a lot of words with 2 or more syllables in the book. If they are tricky to read, using your phonics will help you read most of them. There are also a number of words ending in suffixes – can you find 5 words which end with ing and one word for each of the endings ness, er and ies

Go to Marc Martin makes picture books to see an interesting short video of the author talking about how he illustrated the book.
You can see lots of his pictures and his other books here
Make inferences on the basis of what is being said and done.

Discuss and clarify the meanings of words, linking new meanings to known vocabulary.

Read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same graphemes as above.

Read words containing common suffixes.
Go to Learning by Questions here and select The Owl and the Pussy Cat from the weeks beginning 11th May and 18th May. Work through the four activities – perhaps over four days – re-reading the poem each time.

Read the poem The Jumblies by Edward Lear
Read it for yourself or ask someone to read it to you. In what ways is this the same as The Owl and the Pussy Cat and how does it differ?

Choose one of the poems and learn it by heart.
Answer and ask questions.

Predict what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far.

Listen to, discuss and express views about a wide range of contemporary and classic poetry.

Continue to build up a repertoire of poems learnt by heart, appreciating these and reciting some, with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are a boat sailing down a river or on the sea. Write about your journey – what do you see, taste, smell and hear? Where does your journey start and finish? Do you have any adventures on the way?

When you have finished check your work to ensure your verbs are all in the correct tense.
Develop positive attitudes towards and stamina for writing by writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional).

Re-read to check that their writing makes sense and that verbs to indicate time are used correctly and consistently, including verbs in the continuous form.
Write your own poem about a journey to a made up place. Think about the rhyming pattern you are going to use.

When you have finished your poem, and made any changes you wish to make, write it out again as neatly as you can and illustrate it.
Develop positive attitudes towards and stamina for writing by writing poetry.

Write capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower case letters.

Use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.
Go to Spelling Frame and choose Y2, list 26.
Play some of the games and then take the test.
Learn the possessive apostrophe (singular) [for example, the girl’s book].
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Complete this sentence by adding a list of at least 4 items – think about the punctuation you will need to use.
"If I was going on a boat trip I would take ………… "
Try to include some things which belong to someone else e.g. Grandma’s binoculars, Fred’s sunglasses.

Go to Learning by Questions and select the punctuation tasks for weeks beginning 6th and 25th April.
The punctuation tasks will give you further practice at using commas in lists and apostrophes for possession.
Learn how to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly (see English Appendix 2), including full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks, question marks, commas for lists and apostrophes for contracted forms and the possessive (singular).
Play the and / but game thinking of different journeys you might take – for example:
When I go to school I take my PE kit and my reading book but I don’t take my pet mouse. Write one or more of your sentences down.
Use subordination (using when, if, that, or because) and co-ordination (using or, and, or but).
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
The first, and last pages of A River show a picture of the girl’s bedroom and a picture of her sitting at a table writing.
Choose one of those pictures and describe it in detail to someone. You could even ask them to draw what you are describing. When you have finished show them the picture – is that what they saw in their imagination or in their drawing?
Give well-structured descriptions.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Traffic Count
Talk to pupils about road safety and the importance of finding a safe place to carry out this task.
Discuss what they want to find out. Pupils to decide on their own lines of enquiry.
For example:
• Are there more vehicles passing at 9.30 than 2.30?
• Is a Monday busier than a Wednesday?
• Are there more lorries on a particular day of the week.

Pupils to plan and record their findings on a tally chart. They may need to record their data over a week.
They make a pictogram or block diagram to show their findings. Pupils interpret their data and make some conclusions.
Interpret and construct simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables.
Numbers of wheels
Unicycles have one wheel; bicycles have two wheels and tricycles have three wheels.

Pupils to solve simple problems related to different scenarios using their multiplication knowledge.
For example:
• There were 5 tricycles parked up. How many wheels? Pupils to write the calculation as a mathematical statement using the X and = symbols.
• There were 13 unicycles, 12 bicycles and 10 tricycles in the bike park. How many wheels altogether? A quarter of the bicycles are taken out. How many bicycles are left? What is the total number of wheels left in the bike park?
• There were 57 wheels in total in the bike park. There were some unicycles, bicycles and tricycles. How many of each could there be? Can you find a different solution?
Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables, including recognising odd and even numbers.

Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (×), division (÷) and equals (=) signs

Show that multiplication of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot.

Solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts.
Vehicle Logos
Pupils to look carefully at vehicle badges and logos. These could be on cars, trains or planes.

Reinforce the understanding of symmetry. Pupils to sort pictures of logos into two groups, those that are symmetrical and those that are not. Pupils to design and draw some logos that are symmetrical and some that are not.
Identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line.
Designing a vehicle or boat
Within Design and Technology pupils have been asked to build a vehicle or boat. If using junk modelling can they describe the properties of the three dimensional shapes? What is the same and what is different about any two shapes?
Identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces.
Journey Times
Journeys to School
• Discuss what time pupils would leave their house for school. Pupils to time themselves to see how long it takes to walk or drive to school.
• Pupils to share their journey start and finish times with their peers. Can pupils order the journey times from the shortest to the longest?

Timetables
• Share a simple bus, train or flight timetable.
• Can the pupils draw the correct time on a clock, focusing on quarter past and quarter to for the different bus stops? Pupils can be extended to the nearest five minutes.
Read the time on a clock to the nearest 15 minutes.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Take a small lump of plasticine or play dough. If you don’t have any, have a go at making some – there is a very simple recipe here

Drop your lump of play dough in to a sink full of water. What happens?

Can you make your lump of play dough float by kneading it in to a boat shape?

What is the largest piece of play dough that you can make in to a boat shape and make it float?
Find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Observational drawings of wheels
With permission look closely at some wheels on a car, bicycle or scooter.

Make a very careful drawing of all parts of the wheels. Make sure you capture all the fine detail.

Consider using pencil or a fine black pen to capture the detail.
Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
Bicycles in times gone by
Research what bicycles looked like in the past. The following links will help you.

The Evolution Of The Bicycle
The Bicycle: great inventions that changed history

Draw careful drawings of bicycles in the past, maybe a tricycle.
Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
Explore the work of Quentin Blake.
Listen to Mrs Armitage Queen of the Road by Quentin Blake and look closely at how the illustrations have been drawn. Note the black outline around all of the characters

You could use extracts from the clips below where Quentin Blake explains his drawing process:
10 Minutes of Illustration Part 1
10 Minutes of Illustration Part 2

Draw a picture of a vehicle in the style of Quentin Blake.
Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and make a moving vehicle with wheels

• Look at a range of wheeled vehicles and observe their different features.
• Look closely at toy vehicles with wheels and how they work. Identify the axle.
• Pupils to design a new vehicle for Mr Gumpy for the 21st Century, drawing a detailed plan with labels.
• Pupils to consider their safety when cutting etc.
• Make and decorate your vehicle.
• Evaluate how it works. What improvements could be made?
Design
• Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
• Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make
• Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
• Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Evaluate
• Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
• Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.
Design and make a raft or boat

• Look at a range of rafts or boats and observe their different features.
• Consider materials that would be good for making a raft or boat? Are they waterproof and buoyant?
• Design your own raft or boat? Make a detailed, labelled drawing.
• Now make a prototype. Test it on some water. Consider how you could improve it.
• Build a second prototype. Is it better? Which floats better? Test to see which can carry the most weight. Remember to make it a fair test!
• Pupils to consider their safety when cutting materials etc.
Design
• Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
• Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make
• Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
• Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Evaluate
• Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
• Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Christopher Columbus was a very famous explorer – find out about him here

He sailed from Spain to the Americas although his aim was to get to China but without sailing all the way around Africa. Can you find North America, South America and Africa on a map? Which continents are Spain and China in? Which ocean did Columbus cross to get to the Americas? If he had sailed from the Americas to China which ocean would he have had to cross?
Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans.
When going on holiday many people choose to go to the seaside or to the hills and mountains. Can you locate these popular holiday destinations on a map of the UK:
• Brighton
• Torquay
• Llandudno
• Blackpool
• Oban
• Scarborough
• Clacton
• Southend-on-Sea
• The Lake District
• Snowdonia
• Cairngorms
• Yorkshire Dales
• The Cotswolds
• Sherwood Forest

Describe a beach, cliff, coast, sea, ocean, river, hill, valley, forest and mountain.
Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.
Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:
beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river and valley.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Here are the names of some people who have undertaken famous journeys in the past:
• Christopher Columbus
• Jebediah Smith
• Amelia Earhart
• Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay
• Marco Polo
• Gertrude Bell
• Zheng He
• Sacagawea


Find out about the journeys that some of these people made and why they are famous.
You could start looking here:
Christopher Columbus

Jebediah Smith

Amelia Earhart

Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay

Marco Polo

Gertrude Bell

Zheng He

Sacagawea

When you have found out about them, write a few sentences to explain why they are famous. Include information about where they were from, when they went on their journey, and why they are famous.

Learn about the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to the music Die Moldau (also known as Vltava) by Czech composer Bedrich Smetana.

The music tells the story of a river’s journey from being a small stream in the hills, to when it is joined by another stream and then gradually works its way through the countryside until it joins another river called the Elbe. Which instruments begin the piece of music? Can you picture the river in your mind as you listen?

If you were writing a piece of music about the journey of a river which instruments would you start with? How would you build the music up to show how it is growing in size?
Listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Move around the house or garden imagining you are a river - would your movements be smooth or jerky, fast or slow? How would they change as the river gets broader and deeper?

Can you sequence some of these movements together to create a short dance – perhaps using the music Die Moldau. Why not perform it to some of your family?
Master basic movements including running, jumping, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities.

Perform dances using simple movement patterns.

Year 3

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Collins Connect, select Teacher and sign in
username - parents@harpercollins.co.uk
password - Parents20!

In the colour band list click More, select Lime and choose Where on Earth? Take a look at the contents page – do you recognise any of the names listed?

What do you know about them? Read or listen to the book - there are questions at the end of each 2 page spread. The answers are given at the top of the next page.

Check that you understand all of the words in the book – do you know the meaning of ambassador, scurvy, bandit? Try to work them out from the context but look them up in a dictionary if you need to. When you have read the book complete the activities at the end. Can you use each of them in a sentence?
Retrieve and record information from non-fiction using contents pages and indexes to locate information.

Develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read.

Understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by
checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context.
Read another book about journeys – fiction or non-fiction. You can order e-books free from public libraries. Take a look at the Journeys book list on our website for some ideas. They include Voyage of the Dawn Treader and Five go off to a Camp – many of the Famous Five books involve journeys.

Alternatively visit Poetry Foundation and read the narrative poems The Jumblies and The Owl and the Pussy Cat both of which are about journeys.

What did you like / dislike about the poems? Can you find any other poems about journeys?
Develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.

Recognise some different forms of poetry [for example, free verse, narrative poetry].
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Follow the link below to find information about famous explorers: Ducksters World Explorers

Choose one of the Explorers you have been reading about. Imagine you are that person and write a diary about your journey.

What did you think, feel, do on your journey? How did you feel when you got to the end of it?

Make sure you link your paragraphs so they follow on from each other for example using time related phrases such as After that, Later that day.
Draft and write by organising paragraphs around a theme.
Go to The Literacy Shed and watch the film Little Boat.

Which words would you use to describe the sound made by the boat in the water, the birds as they fly across and the rain? Are your words onomatopoeic – do they imitate the sounds they represent for example hiss, buzz? For more about onomatopoeia go to BBC Bitesize

Which words would you use to describe what the heavy rain and the mist which follows it look like?

Compose four sentences using some of the words you have listed. Can you join your ideas together using a range of conjunctions?

Pause the film Little Boat at two different places. At each point write a short poem about what you see starting each sentence with a preposition for example Above the water the birds fluttered quickly by. In the boat the monkeys chattered happily.
Draft and write by composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Follow the link below to find information about famous explorers Ducksters World Explorers Choose one of the Explorers you have been reading about.

Imagine you are that person and write a diary about your journey. What did you think, feel, do on your journey? How did you feel when you got to the end of it.

Make sure you link your paragraphs so they follow on from each other for example using time related phrases such as After that, Later that day.
Express time, place and cause using conjunctions [for example, when, before, after, while, so, because], adverbs [for example, then, next, soon, therefore], or prepositions [for example, before, after, during, in, because of].
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to The Literacy Shed and watch the film Little Boat.

Which words would you use to describe the sound made by the boat in the water, the birds as they fly across and the rain? Are your words onomatopoeic – do they imitate the sounds they represent for example hiss, buzz?

Which words would you use to describe what the heavy rain and the mist which follows it look like?
Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
When you fly on an aeroplane for a long journey, it is usual to have a meal or meals provided. Different air lines will provide different things for their meals.

This link takes you to a newspaper article which was about the different kinds of food offered by different airlines. How Plane Food Compares on 10 Major Airlines

Look at the images for the economy class meals provided by Singapore Airlines, Virgin Atlantic, Air New Zealand, and Korean Air.

Carry out a survey of people in your home and people who you can contact through emails / face time etc.

Which of these meals would they prefer to be offered?

Create a tally chart of the information that you obtain.

How else could you present the data that you gather? You could create a pictogram or a bar chart.

Why do you think that people made the decisions that they did?
Present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.
Where in the world would you like to journey to? Pick a location and search the internet for data that tells you the average monthly rainfall for that location. A good place to go is to use the Bing search engine and type in ‘climate data’ and then the name of the place you have chosen. Then click on the button that says ‘Rain’.

Do the same for where you live.

Take both sets of rainfall data and create a clustered column bar chart. This is a bar chart that shows two sets of data on a single graph. You will need a key to show which bars are for which place.

Year 3 maths
Present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.
Go to Expedia.co.uk. Expedia.co.uk

This is a website where you can buy holidays. Pick a location somewhere in the world. Find the prices of flights to that location for a date in a month’s time. Look for prices to fly from your nearest airport if you can. If not, look to fly from one of the London airports.

What is the cheapest and most expensive flight that you can find? Find the difference between these flights.

What if you travelled to other locations? What is the difference between the cheapest and most expensive flights to these locations.

What would the cost be for different flights if you were booking for different groups of people to travel together? What about if you booked for the people who lived in your house? What about if you invited some more of your relatives or friends to come along?
Add and subtract numbers mentally, including:
• a three-digit number and ones
• a three-digit number and tens
• a three-digit number and hundreds.

Add and subtract numbers with up to three digits, using formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction.

Write and calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division using the multiplication tables that they know, including for two-digit numbers times one-digit numbers, using mental and progressing to formal written methods.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find a toy car or build one from something like Lego.

Look about for different floor surfaces – carpets, floor boards, tiles, concrete, soil, gravel.

See how far the car will travel of you give it a single push on each surface.

You can measure how far the car travels and maybe make a chart or a graph to show the results.

Which surfaces does the car travel best on? Why do you think that this is?
Compare how things move on different surfaces.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Year 3 art and design

Be swept away on an elaborate flight of fancy in this Caldecott award-winning, wondrously illustrated picture book about self-determination and unexpected friendship. Watch ‘The Journey’ on YouTube

Listen to Aaron Becker talking about The Journey and his work

• Watercolours were used to paint the illustrations. Watch Aaron Becker’s online water colour lesson Explore the use of water colours and how you can change the intensity of the colours. The sky is an important feature in many of the pictures. Create different skies that might imply the mood and the time of day.
• Imagine that you could draw a magic door from your classroom into another world. Draw or paint the view to the other side. You could use your water colour skills!
• Look at the different modes of transport in the story.

Create an illustration of them or a three dimensional representation.
Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Year 3 design and technology

Design your own airship.
Watch ‘The Journey’ on YouTube looking closely at the images of the airship.
• Research airships and look at the common features.
• Imagine you have been commissioned to design an airship.
• You can be as creative as you like!
• Label your annotated drawings with the key features.
Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Roman place names. Here is a list of 140 place names in the British Isles: List of Roman place names in Britain

Can you find where some of them are on a modern map?

If you live in Britain, which ones are local to where you live?
Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping.
Revise your knowledge of the 5 oceans. Describe the location of these oceans in relation to the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle.

Imagine you are on a ship sailing around the coast of mainland Britain. Which oceans / seas / channels will you travel through? Which one is closest to where you live?
Identify the position and significance of… Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
When the Romans occupied large parts of Britain, they set up the first planned network of roads across the country.

Find out about how Roman roads were constructed and why they were so important for the Romans. You could begin your search for information here: Roman Roads or Roman roads in Britain facts for kids

Remember – if you look on other websites on the internet, stay safe. Get an adult to help you find safe websites to look at.

Create a diagram to show how Roman roads were built. You could look here for information: Roman Roads

Can you draw some of the main Roman roads on an outline map of the British Isles? Have a look here to find an outline map that you could print out: United Kingdom Outline Map Or you could sketch an outline map of the British Isles.

Here are seven of the main Roman roads built in Britain:
Stane Street
Dere Street
Ermine Street
Akeman Street
Portway
Fosse Way
Watling Street
Place them on the map. You could look here for help: Roman roads in Britain facts for kids

Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Understand the impact of the Roman invasion on Britain – the ‘Romanisation’ of Britain.
Roman place names. Here is a list of 140 place names in the British Isles: List of Roman place names in Britain

Can you find where they are on a modern map?

If you live in Britain, which ones are local to where you live?
Understand the impact of the Roman invasion on Britain – the ‘Romanisation’ of Britain.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to Theme From The Onedin Line which was used as the theme music for a TV drama series about a shipping line. The music is from the ballet Spartacus by the Russian composer Aram Khachaturian.

Why do you think the programme makers chose this music for a programme about ships? Do you think it was a good choice – why / why not?
Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
Choose an extract from the film Little Boat. What sort of music could accompany the scene? Which instruments would you choose to use? Would they all play at once or would the tune be passed around? Would the music be loud, soft or changing in volume? What about the tempo – would it be slow, moderate or fast?Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Think of different ways you can move around where it is safe to do so making sure you keep 2m apart from anyone who is not in your household – for example moving at different speeds, changing direction, moving with the weight on different parts of your body e.g. on one foot, on your hands and knees, by rolling. How many different ways can you find? Sequence three or more of these movements together.Use running, jumping… in isolation and in combination.

Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance.

Year 4

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Collins Connect, select Teacher and sign in
username - parents@harpercollins.co.uk
password - Parents20!

In the colour band list click More, select Lime and choose Where on Earth?. Take a look at the contents page – do you recognise any of the names listed? What do you know about them?

Read or listen to the book - there are questions at the end of each 2 page spread. The answers are given at the top of the next page. Check that you understand all of the words in the book – do you know the meaning of ambassador, scurvy, bandit?

Try to work them out from the context but look them up in a dictionary if you need to. When you have read the book complete the activities at the end.
Develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
• reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.
• using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read.

Understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context.

Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.
Read another book about journeys – fiction or non-fiction.

You can order ebooks free from public libraries. Take a look at the Journeys book list on our website for some ideas. They include Voyage of the Dawn Treader and Five go off to a Camp – many of the Famous Five books involve journeys. Alternatively visit Poetry Foundation and read the narrative poems The Jumblies and The Owl and the Pussy Cat both of which are about journeys.

What did you like / dislike about the poems? Can you find any other poems about journeys?
Develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
• reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.
• recognising some different forms of poetry [for example, free verse, narrative poetry].
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Follow the link below to find information about famous explorers Ducksters World Explorers Choose one of the Explorers you have been reading about. Imagine you are that person and write a diary about your journey.

What did you think, feel, do on your journey? How did you feel when you got to the end of it?

Make sure you link your paragraphs so they follow on from each other for example using time related phrases and fronted adverbials such as At dawn, After breakfast, Later that day.
Draft and write by organising paragraphs around a theme.
Go to The Literacy Shed and watch the film Little Boat.

Which words would you use to describe the sound made by the boat in the water, the birds as they fly across and the rain? Are your words onomatopoeic – do they imitate the sounds they represent for example hiss, buzz? For more about onomatopoeia go to BBC Bitsize

Which words would you use to describe what the heavy rain and the mist which follows it look like? Compose five sentences using some of the words you have listed. Can you join your ideas together using a range of conjunctions?

Pause the film Little Boat at two different places. At each point write a short poem about what you see starting each sentence with a preposition for example Above the water the birds fluttered quickly by. In the boat the monkeys chattered happily.
Compose and rehearse sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Choose one of the Explorers you have been reading about. Imagine you are that person and write a diary about your journey.

What did you think, feel, do on your journey? How did you feel when you got to the end of it. You can find more information about many of the explorers here Ducksters World Explorers.

Make sure you link your paragraphs so they follow on from each other for example using time related phrases and fronted adverbials such as At dawn, After breakfast, Later that day.
Use fronted adverbials [for example, Later that day, I heard the bad news.]
Pause the film Little Boat at two different places. At each point write a short poem about what you see starting each sentence with a preposition and using a range of modifying adjectives for example Above the water the soaring birds fluttered quickly by. In the middle of the boat, the excited monkeys chattered happily.Write noun phrases expanded by the addition of modifying adjectives, nouns and preposition phrases.
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
The Literacy Shed and watch the film Little Boat.

Which words would you use to describe the sound made by the boat in the water, the birds as they fly across and the rain? Are your words onomatopoeic – do they imitate the sounds they represent for example hiss, buzz?

Which words would you use to describe what the heavy rain and the mist which follows it look like?
Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Expedia.co.uk This is a website where you can buy holidays. Pick a location somewhere in the world. Find the prices of flights to that location for a date in a month’s time. Look for prices to fly from your nearest airport if you can. If not, look to fly from one of the London airports.

What is the cheapest and most expensive flight that you can find? Find the difference between these flights.

What if you travelled to other locations? What is the difference between the cheapest and most expensive flights to these locations.

What would the cost be for different flights if you were booking for different groups of people to travel together? What about if you booked for the people who lived in your house? What about if you invited some more of your relatives or friends to come along?
Add and subtract numbers mentally, including:
• a three-digit number and ones
• a three-digit number and tens
• a three-digit number and hundreds

Add and subtract numbers with up to three digits, using formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction.

Write and calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division using the multiplication tables that they know, including for two-digit numbers times one-digit numbers, using mental and progressing to formal written methods.
Go to Google Maps. Click on the directions button.

Here, you can put in different locations around the UK and it will tell you how long it will take to travel between them. It will tell you how long it is if you drive, if you walk, if you cycle, take the bus, or if you travel by train (if you can). See how long it takes to travel between some locations around the UK. Work out the difference between travelling using different modes of transport.
Estimate, compare and calculate different measure.

Solve addition and subtraction two-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.
Go to British Airways Website This will show you seating plans for the economy travel sections of seven of the aircraft that British Airways fly.

Each of the blue rectangles is a seat. Firstly, count the number of seats that each aircraft has. Then, use your partitioning strategies to help you work out how much money the airline can make for a flight if each seat was filled.

For example, if each seat cost £250 and the aircraft has 65 seats, you could work out 250 x 10, then multiply this by 6 to work out the price of 60 seats. Then adding on 250 x 5 will then give you the price for all of the seats added together.

Work out the price for all of the seats for each plane for these flights:
• London to New York £520
• London to Paris £120
• London to Dublin £70
• London to Berlin £105
• London to Rome £130
• London to Moscow £240
• London to Istanbul £380
Solve problems involving multiplying.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Science Bob gives you information about how to make a balloon rocket.

Try making balloon rockets with different amounts of air in them. Maybe count the number of times that you push the plunger on a balloon pump to measure the amount of air in the balloon. What effect does this have on how far the rocket travels? Measure and record how far along the string the balloon rocket travels on a graph or chart.
Set up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests.

Make systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment.

Gather, record, classify and present data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions.

Record findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables.

Use results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Year 4 Art and design

Be swept away on an elaborate flight of fancy in this Caldecott award-winning, wondrously illustrated picture book about self-determination and unexpected friendship.

Watch ‘The Journey’ on YouTube here.

Listen to Aaron Becker talking about The Journey and his work here

• Watercolours were used to paint the illustrations. Watch Aaron Becker’s online water colour lesson here. Explore the use of water colours and how you can change the intensity of the colours. The sky is an important feature in many of the pictures. Create different skies that might imply the mood and the time of day.
• Imagine that you could draw a magic door from your classroom into another world. Draw or paint the view to the other side. You could use your water colour skills!
• Look at the different modes of transport in the story. Create an illustration of them or a three dimensional representation.

Create your own page that tells a different part of the story.
Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Make a Viking longship model. This video might give you some ideas

Or This website might give you an idea

A template can be found here

When you have made your model, label the parts of the ship.

From your research in to Viking longships, can you write a brief description to go with your model?
Make: select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
Year 4 Art and design

Design your own airship
Watch ‘The Journey’ on YouTube looking closely at the images of the airship here
• Research airships and look at the common features.
• Imagine you have been commissioned to design an airship.
• You can be as creative as you like!
• Label your annotated drawings with the key features.
Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Revise your knowledge of the 5 oceans. Describe the location of these oceans in relation to the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle. Which of the Explorers you read about crossed these imaginary lines? Which compass direction did the Vikings travel in to reach Britain?

Imagine you are on a ship sailing around the coast of mainland Britain. Which oceans / seas / channels will you travel through? Which one is closest to where you live? Use the points of the compass to describe where each of the oceans / seas are in relation to where you live.
Identify the position and significance of… Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle.

Use the eight points of a compass…to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
In 793, Anglo-Saxon scribes wrote in a famous book called The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, “In this year terrible portents appeared over Northumbria, and miserably frightened the inhabitants: these were exceptional flashes of lightning, and fiery dragons were seen flying in the air.” He then goes on to talk about raids by Vikings on the coasts of North East England. Some historians think that the reference to fiery dragons is actually a reference to the ships that the Vikings used to cross the North Sea from their homelands in Scandinavia.

Find out what made these Viking longships special. How were they built? What did they look like? How were they powered?

You could begin your search for information here.

You could look at other websites, but remember to be safe when you search the internet. It may be best to do so with an adult.

Amazingly, several Viking ships have survived. You can see images of them at the following museum’s websites: UiO Museum of Cultural History and Vikingeskibsmuseet.

When you have found your information about Viking longships, decide how best to present your information. You could write a passage about what you have found out. You could create a presentation about longships using your computer.
Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Viking raids and invasions.
Make a Viking longship model. This video might give you some ideas here

Or this website might give you an idea here.

A template can be found here

When you have made your model, label the parts of the ship.

From your research in to Viking longships, can you write a brief description to go with your model?
Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Viking raids and invasions.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to The Theme From The Onedin Line which was used as the theme music for a TV drama series about a shipping line. The music is from the ballet Spartacus by the Russian composer Aram Khachaturian.

Why do you think the programme makers chose this music for a programme about ships? Do you think it was a good choice – why / why not?

The Flying Dutchman Overture by Wagner is another piece of music about a ship: listen here - this time a mysterious ghost ship. Which of the two pieces of music do you like the most and why?
Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
Choose an extract from the film Little Boat. What sort of music could accompany the scene? Which instruments would you choose to use? Would they all play at once or would the tune be passed around? Would the music be loud, soft or changing in volume? What about the tempo – would it be slow, moderate or fast?Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Think of different ways you can move around where it is safe to do so making sure you keep 2m apart from anyone who is not in your household – for example moving at different speeds, changing direction, moving with the weight on different parts of your body e.g. on one foot, on your hands and knees, by rolling. How many different ways can you find? Sequence four or more of these movements together.Use running, jumping…in isolation and in combination.

Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance.

Year 5

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read these two poems about railway journeys A Railway Carriage and Night Mail.

What do you notice about the rhythm of the poems? You may need to read them through a couple of times to ensure you can read them fluently and feel the rhythm of them. Can you identify the rhyming pattern in each poem – how are the poems structured? Make a note of the scenery, places, objects and people each train passes – which of them are common to both poems? Which literary / poetic devices do the poets use e.g. similes, repetition, personification? Are these effective? Which of the poems do you like the most and why? Choose one of the poems and learn it by heart. Record your performance and send it to friends and family.

Robert Louis Stevenson wrote several novels – can you name any of them? He also travelled a great deal spending part of his life in N America and in Samoa.
Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.

Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by continuing to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks.

Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by learning a wider range of poetry by heart.
Author Katherine Rundell asked many popular children’s authors to write a story for a Book of Hopes. You can read the book on The Literacy Trust. Read the first paragraph of My First Expedition to the Wilderness by Ed Clarke on p287.

. Where do you think the person is? How are they feeling? How does the author develop this emotion in the next few paragraphs through the way the sentences are structured and the language used? Before you move on to the next page predict how the story will end. Now read the last part of the story – were you right? Are you surprised by the ending - do you think it is a good way to finish the story?
Understand what he/she reads by drawing inferences such as inferring characters' feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.

Understand what he/she reads in increasingly complex texts by predicting what might happen from details stated and implied.
If you are able to obtain a copy, read or listen to The Explorer by Katherine Rundell. The book is about 4 children who crash land in the Amazon and the adventures they have. You can hear her talking about the book and reading an extract from it here.

Find out all you can about explorers of the Amazon River and Amazon Rain Forest using any books you may have and the internet. Remember what you need to do to stay safe on line. You can find out about one famous Amazon explorer here and about the Amazon rain forest here.
Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write your own adventure story starting with a journey which goes wrong – a plane crash, shipwreck, getting lost etc. Think about where your story will take place and who the characters will be. How will they get out of the difficult situation they are in? Do they meet someone who helps them – or maybe make the problem worse?! Add detail to the story through the use of relative clauses for example in giving more information about one of the characters.

When you have finished your story re-read it carefully and make any necessary changes and improvements, taking particular care to ensure that the punctuation is correct and helps the reader by clarifying meaning and avoiding ambiguity.

You may want to spread these tasks out over a few days.
Plan his/her writing of narratives by considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what the class have read, listened to or seen performed.

Draft and write narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character.

Proof-read for punctuation errors, including use of brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis; use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity.
Using your research on the Amazon write a fact file on the subject. Plan the layout of the fact file to ensure it is easy for the reader to follow. Think about the organisational devices you will use when presenting your work.

Once you have created your fact file, plan a short talk on one aspect of the Amazon. You may want to use Powerpoint to record your notes. Present your talk to members of your household or over the internet to other family / friends.
Plan his/her writing by identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, using other similar writing as models for his/her own.

Draft and write by using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader e.g. headings, bullet points, underlining.

Proof-read for spelling errors linked to spelling statements for Year 5.
Go to Spellingframe, select Y5 / 6 and spelling rules 39 and 40. Do some of the activities and, when you think you can spell all the words, take the test.Spell words ending in -able and -ible also -ably and -ibly e.g. adorable, possible, adorably, possibly.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Add detail to the story (see writing above) through the use of relative clauses for example in giving more information about one of the characters. For more information on relative clauses go to BBC Bitesize.Use relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun.
When you have finished your story re-read it carefully and make any necessary changes and improvements, taking particular care to ensure that the punctuation is correct and helps the reader by clarifying meaning and avoiding ambiguity.Use commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity.
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Choose one of the poems (from reading above) and learn it by heart. Record your performance and send it to friends and family.Prepare poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
When you travel from an airport or on a ferry / Eurostar train, you are able to shop “Duty Free”. This means that VAT (a tax on certain goods put in place by the government) is not charged. That means that things that you buy at the duty free shops are cheaper than they are on the high street or on line.

One of the most popular thing to buy at duty free shops is perfume and aftershave.

Go to The Perfume Shop This is the website of a shop that has branches at most airports in the UK.

Here you can find how much they are selling perfumes and aftershaves for on the high street. This is obviously after VAT has been applied, so it is really showing 120% of the value. Work out how much some of these products would cost at the duty free shops.

For example, Dior “Sauvage” aftershave (60ml) costs £55.
This is 120%.
To calculate the cost before VAT is added, I could divide £55 by 12 to find 10% (£4.58 after I have rounded the decimals to two decimal places). I can then multiply this by 10 to find 100% (£45.80).
Recognise the per cent symbol (%) and understand that per cent relates to ‘number of parts per hundred’, and write percentages as a fraction with denominator 100, and as a decimal.

Solve problems which require knowing percentage and decimal equivalents of ½, ¼, 1/5, 2/5, 4/5and those fractions with a denominator of a multiple of 10 or 25.
Go to Fold'NFly
This website gives you detailed instructions on how to make 45 different designs of paper aeroplane.

Have a go at making some of the designs.

See how far they fly. Measure the distance that they fly and record the data in a table or graph.

Unfold your paper planes. Estimate and then measure the angles that have been formed by the folds that you have made on the paper.
Draw given angles, and measure them in degrees (o).

Complete, read and interpret information in tables.
Go to British Airways Website This will show you seating plans for the economy travel sections of seven of the air craft that British Airways fly.

Each of the blue rectangles is a seat.

When you have calculated the number of seats that are available on each type of aircraft, calculate how much it would cost to buy tickets for all of the seats on the aircraft. Here are the prices of each ticket for certain journeys:
• London to New York £527
• London to Paris £126
• London to Dublin £78
• London to Berlin £117
• London to Rome £139
• London to Moscow £242
• London to Istanbul £389
Multiply numbers up to 4 digits by a one- or two-digit number using a formal written method, including long multiplication for two-digit numbers.
Where in the world would you like to journey to? Pick a location and search the internet for data that tells you the average monthly temperature for that location. A good place to go is to use the Bing search engine and type in ‘climate data’ followed by the name of the place you have chosen. Then click on the button that says ‘Temperature’.

Find the average maximum temperature for different months through the year.

Do the same for where you live.

Now plot both sets of data on to a line graph. Your graph will end up with two lines, one for each location. It will look a bit like the example below. You will need to use different colours to show the two lines with a key so we know which data set relates to which location.

Year 5 maths

Work out the monthly differences in temperatures between locations.

You could create a graph which has more than two locations on.
Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line graph.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Fold'NFly This website gives you detailed instructions on how to make 45 different designs of paper aeroplane.

Have a go at making some of the designs.

See how far they fly. Measure the distance that they fly and record the data in a table or graph.

Consider carefully how to make your comparison as fair as possible.

What might happen if you made the paper planes with different sized pieces of paper? What if you made the planes to the same design, but made one with a full sheet of paper and one with half a piece of paper? Would the smaller plane fly further or less far? What if you used different kinds of paper, but the same size each time? For example, printer paper, tissue paper, newspaper, thin card? Predict which will fly further and then try it out to see whether your prediction was correct.

Write a short paragraph to explain your conclusions.
Plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary.

Take measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate.

Record data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs.

Use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.

Report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations.
When you throw a paper plane, there are three forces that act on it. Can you work out what the three forces are?

Draw a diagram showing how these three forces act on the paper plane. Describe the effect that the three forces have on how the plane moves.

Teachers – the three forces are thrust (the force that you use to throw the plane), air resistance, and gravity. The thrust propels the plane forwards. The air resistance slows the plane down as it flies. Gravity pulls the plane to the floor. When the plane is first released, the force of thrust must be strong enough to overcome the effects of air resistance and gravity. As the plane flies, the thrust reduces as the air resistance slows the plane down. Gravity pulls the plane down.
Explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object.

Identify the effects of air resistance.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
In Literacy you listened to an extract of The Explorer by Katherine Rundell which is set in the Amazon rain forest.

In 1989 British artist John Dyer explored the Amazon as a photographer for Thames TV. At that time an Amazonian Indian, Nixiwaka, was a small boy living with his tribe the Yawanawá in the Amazon Rainforest. 26 years later John and Nixiwaka met at the Eden Project. John Dyer’s Amazon experience turned him into an artist and painter and John discovered that one of Nixiwaka’s dreams is to paint.

Then in May 2015 they came together in a unique cultural exchange to create a new exhibition of paintings to inspire a new generation to connect to the rainforest.

They worked together in the largest captive rainforest on the planet at the Eden Project to produce a series of new paintings exploring the Spirit of the Rainforest from the Western and Amazonian cultural perspective.

• Watch the series of videos that focus on the project called ‘Spirit of the Rainforest’ here.
• Create your own picture in the style of the artists. Look here at John Dyer’s work for some inspiration here.
Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and make a weather station. Explorers need to closely monitor the weather!
  • What is a weather station? Pupils to research weather stations on the internet. What is their purpose? Include research on rain gauges, barometers, wind vanes and thermometers.

  • Pupils to design and make a wind vane or rain gauge.

  • Review and discuss which materials would be appropriate e.g. waterproof.

  • Make up the weather station including a barometer and thermometer. Test out the weather station and collect the data daily.

  • Evaluate the weather station. Do they think the data is accurate? How could they improve their weather station?
  • Design

    • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.

    • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.


    Make

    • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.

    • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.


    Evaluate

    • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.

    • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.

    Geography
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Where did the Anglo-Saxons settle? Place names in England can often indicate that a settlement may have originally been settled by the Anglo-Saxons. This website gives you information about how a place name might indicate an Anglo-Saxon origin: Anglo-Saxons in Britain.

    Have a look at a map of your county (if you live in England), or a map of England in general. Can you find any place names that might indicate an Anglo-Saxon origin?
    Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom.
    Find the River Severn (the longest river in the UK) and the Amazon River (in South America). Follow the course of each river on a map or globe.

    Where does the river start and end – can you describe what the surrounding area is like at those points? How long is the river – where is the halfway point?

    Describe what the area looks like at this point. When you have studied the rivers, create a table showing key information on each river for example the length of the river, the number of countries it passes through.

    Use your table to identify the similarities and differences between the rivers and the areas they pass through.
    Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom…and a region within North or South America.

    Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
    History
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Anglo Saxon Kingdoms. The Anglo-Saxons were people who travelled to parts of the British Isles from their original homelands in Northern Europe. They settled in different kingdoms in the British Isles.
    Download and print out an outline map of the United Kingdom from
    WorldAtlas

    Alternatively, create a sketch map of the outline of the United Kingdom.
    Find the names of the main Anglo-Saxon kingdoms and show them on your outline map. Which kingdom was the area of the UK you live in part of? Or was it part of a kingdom ruled over by different people?

    Information about the different Anglo-Saxon kingdoms can be found here.
    Learn about Anglo-Saxon invasions, settlements and kingdoms: place names and village life.
    When and why did the Anglo-Saxons travel to and settle in the British Isles? You could start your search here.

    Select the information that you think is most relevant to answer the question from this website and others that you might find on the internet. When searching the internet, remember to be safe – it is best to search the internet with an adult who can make sure that the websites that you are accessing are safe for you to do so.

    When you have your information to answer the question, write a brief information text about when and why the Anglo-Saxons came to the British Isles.
    Learn about Anglo-Saxon invasions, settlements and kingdoms: place names and village life.
    Where did the Anglo-Saxons settle? Place names in England can often indicate that a settlement may have originally been settled by the Anglo-Saxons. This website gives you information about how a place name might indicate an Anglo-Saxon origin: Anglo-Saxons in Britain.

    Have a look at a map of your area (if you live in England), or a map of England in General. Can you find any place names that might indicate an Anglo-Saxon origin?
    Learn about Anglo-Saxon invasions, settlements and kingdoms: place names and village life.
    Music
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Listen to the music Die Moldau (also known as Vltava) by Czech composer Bedrich Smetana here The music tells the story of a river’s journey from being a small stream in the hills, to when it is joined by another stream and then gradually works its way through the countryside until it joins another river called the Elbe.

    Which instruments begin the piece of music? Can you picture the river in your mind as you listen? During its journey it passes the scene of a wedding, goes through rapids and then broadens out as it goes through the city of Prague. Can you identify these scenes in the music?

    Another very famous piece of music is the Blue Danube Waltz by Johann Strauss. Listen to it here. Which of the pieces did you enjoy the most?
    Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
    Physical Education
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Think of different ways you can move around where it is safe to do so – for example moving at different speeds, changing direction, moving with the weight on different parts of your body e.g. on one foot, on your hands and knees, by rolling. How many different ways can you find? Sequence five or more of these movements together.Use running, jumping…in isolation and in combination.

    Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance.

    Year 6

    Reading
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Read these two poems about railway journeys.
    From a Railway Carriage
    Night Mail

    What do you notice about the rhythm of the poems? You may need to read them through a couple of times to ensure you can read them fluently and feel the rhythm of them.

    Can you identify the rhyming pattern in each poem – how are the poems structured?

    Why do you think Auden changes the structure of his poem part of the way through – what impact does the change have?

    Make a note of the scenery, places, objects and people each train passes – which of them are common to both poems?

    Which literary / poetic devices do the poets use e.g. similes, repetition, personification? Are these effective?

    Which of the poems do you like the most and why?

    Choose one of the poems and learn it by heart. Record your performance and send it to friends and family.

    Robert Louis Stevenson wrote several novels – can you name any of them? He also travelled a great deal spending part of his life in N America and in Samoa.
    Understand what he/she reads by identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.

    Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.

    Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by learning a wider range of poetry by heart.
    Author Katherine Rundell asked many popular children’s authors to write a story for a Book of Hopes. You can read the book here.

    Go to page 293 and read An extract from Everdark by Eva Ibbottson.

    How would you summarise the theme/s of this story and the relationship between Bartholomew and Smudge? Find some examples in the text which support your ideas.

    Can you summarise the story using no more than 20 words?
    Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing.

    Understand what he/she reads by summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas and using quotations for illustration.
    If you are able to obtain a copy, read The Explorer by Katherine Rundell. The book is about 4 children who crash land in the Amazon and the adventures they have. You can hear her talking about the book and reading an extract from it here.

    Find out all you can about explorers of the Amazon River and Amazon Rain Forest using any books you may have and the internet. Remember what you need to do to stay safe on line. You can find out about one famous Amazon explorer here and about the Amazon rain forest here.
    Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.
    Writing
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Write your own adventure story starting with a journey which goes wrong – a plane crash, shipwreck, getting lost etc. Think about where your story will take place and who the characters will be. Describe at least one character and one setting in some detail. Do the characters feel they are in a safe place, what are the relationships between them like – how can you portray that through your descriptions and also through dialogue? How will they get out of the difficult situation they are in? Do they meet someone who helps them – or maybe make the problem worse?!

    When you have finished your story re-read it carefully and make any necessary changes and improvements, taking particular care to ensure that your spelling and punctuation are correct.

    You may want to spread these tasks out over a few days.
    Plan his/her writing of narratives through reasoned consideration of how authors have developed characters and settings in what the class have read, listened to or seen performed.

    Draft and write narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere.

    Integrate dialogue to convey character and advance the action.

    Proof-read for spelling errors linked to spelling statements for Year 6.
    Using your research on the Amazon write a fact file on the subject. Plan the layout of the fact file to ensure it is easy for the reader to follow. Think about the organisational devices you will use when presenting your work. When you have completed your writing check to see that punctuation has been used correctly throughout.

    Once you have created your fact file plan a short talk on one aspect of the Amazon. You may want to use PowerPoint to record your notes. Present your talk to members of your household or over the internet to other family / friends.
    Use layout devices e.g. headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text.

    Proof-read for punctuation errors, including use of semi-colons, colons, dashes, punctuation of bullet points in lists, use of hyphens.
    Go to Spellingframe, select Y5/6 and lesson 44. Play some of the activities before taking the test.Use prefixes involving the use of a hyphen e.g. co-ordinate, re-enter.
    Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    In An extract from Everdark pages 295 and 296, there are several examples of the author using hyphens and dashes. Can you explain their use each time you find one in the text – they are not always there for the same reason.Understand how hyphens can be used to avoid ambiguity e.g. man-eating shark versus man-eating shark or recover versus re-cover.
    Spoken English
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Choose one of the poems (from reading above) and learn it by heart. Record your performance and send it to friends and family.Prepare poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience.
    Mathematics
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Go to the British Airways website.
    This will show you seating plans for the economy travel sections of seven of the aircraft that British Airways fly.

    Each of the blue rectangles is a seat.

    When you have calculated the number of seats that are available on each type of aircraft, calculate how much it would cost to buy tickets for all of the seats on the aircraft. Here are the prices of each ticket for certain journeys:

    London to New York £527
    London to Paris £126
    London to Dublin £78
    London to Berlin £117
    London to Rome £139
    London to Moscow £242
    London to Istanbul £389
    Multiply multi-digit numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long multiplication.
    On a coach there are four seats to a row, divided in to two sets of two by an aisle.
    A bit like this…



    But, does it always have to be that way?
    I could design a coach with seats like this…



    How many ways are there to arrange four seats and one aisle in a row?

    What if my coach were able to have five seats in a row with one aisle? Or six seats in a row with an aisle? Or seven? Or eight?
    Work out the number of different ways that you can arrange different numbers of seats with one aisle.

    What do you notice about your results?

    Can you explain your results using an algebraic expression to explain the pattern?

    (Psst – teachers! It is N + 1, where N is the number of seats. For example, with four seats, there are five possible arrangements, shown below.)



    Use what you have found out to predict how many arrangements there might be for 10 seats, 20 seats, 100 seats, 1000 seats…
    Use simple formulae.
    This page tells you all about the Paris to Dakar rally – a motor race that takes place annually.

    Part way down the page, you will find the names of the drivers who won each year, their nationality, and the make of vehicle that they drove. There is information for the four-wheel category (cars) and the two-wheel category (bikes).

    Use this data to construct charts and graphs. You will need to decide how best to present the data and what each graph shows. What about two pie charts showing the nationality of the winners of the races, one for the two-wheel category and one for the four-wheel category? Or bar charts that show the total number of wins by make of vehicle?
    Interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems.
    Science
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Set up two piles of books that are 20cm apart. Your task – build a bridge across the 20cm gap.

    You can only use 5 pieces of A4 paper and Sellotape to build the bridge.

    Balance different sized objects on the bridge. What is the heaviest weight that your bridge can hold? How effective is your bridge? Find the mass of the objects that you are balancing on your bridge using kitchen scales.

    Consider your bridge – what was effective about it? What would you change so that it can hold a greater mass? Try it out.
    Plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary.

    Take measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate.

    Report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations.
    Art and Design
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Create a painting inspired by the Amazon Rainforest.

    In Literacy you listened to an extract of The Explorer by Katherine Rundell which is set in the Amazon rain forest.

    In 1989 British artist John Dyer explored the Amazon as a photographer for Thames TV. At that time an Amazonian Indian, Nixiwaka, was a small boy living with his tribe the Yawanawá in the Amazon Rainforest. 26 years later John and Nixiwaka met at the Eden Project. John Dyer’s Amazon experience turned him into an artist and painter and John discovered that one of Nixiwaka’s dreams is to paint.

    Then in May 2015 they came together in a unique cultural exchange to create a new exhibition of paintings to inspire a new generation to connect to the rainforest.

    They worked together in the largest captive rainforest on the planet at the Eden Project to produce a series of new paintings exploring the Spirit of the Rainforest from the Western and Amazonian cultural perspective.

    Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
    Design and Technology
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Design and make a weather station. Explorers need to closely monitor the weather!

    • What is a weather station? Pupils to research weather stations on the internet. What is their purpose? Include research on rain gauges, barometers, wind vanes and thermometers.

    • Pupils to design and make a wind vane or rain gauge.

    • Review and discuss which materials would be appropriate e.g. waterproof.

    • Make up the weather station including a barometer and thermometer. Test out the weather station and collect the data daily.

    • Evaluate the weather station. Do they think the data is accurate? How could they improve their weather station?

    Design

    • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.

    • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.


    Make

    • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.

    • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.


    Evaluate

    • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.

    • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.

    Geography
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Find the River Severn (the longest river in the UK), the Volga (the longest river in Europe – it is in Russia) and the Amazon River (in South America). Follow the course of each river on a map or globe. Where does each river start and end – can you describe what the surrounding area is like at those points? How long is the river – where is the halfway point? Describe what the area looks like at this point. When you have studied the rivers, create a table showing key information on each river for example the length of the river, the number of countries it passes through, whether it is navigable. Use your table to identify the similarities and differences between the rivers and the areas they pass through.Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America.

    Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
    History
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Compare and contrast methods of travel and transport across periods of history that you have learned about since Year 3. This might include Ancient Greece, Ancient Egypt, the Roman Empire, Saxons and Vikings, or other periods of history.

    Consider river travel, sea travel, or travel overland.

    The history of transport on Wikipedia might be a starting point.

    For travel in Ancient Egypt, you could start here.

    For sea travel in Ancient Greece, you could start here.

    For information about Roman roads, you could start here.

    For information about Viking longships, you could start here:
    Facts About Viking Longships
    Viking Longships

    For information about chariots (used by a lot of different cultures), you could look here.

    There are many other websites that you could look at to find information. But remember – be safe online. Always search the internet with an adult who can help you find safe websites to look at.

    When you have gathered together your information about travel in different time periods, decide on a way to communicate your findings. You could make a poster or posters, design a page for an information book, create the text for a webpage, or create a PowerPoint presentation that you could send to your teacher.
    Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods of study.

    Note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms.
    Music
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Listen to the music Die Moldau (also known as Vltava) by Czech composer Bedrich Smetana. The music tells the story of a river’s journey from being a small stream in the hills, to when it is joined by another stream and then gradually works its way through the countryside until it joins another river the Elbe. Which instruments begin the piece of music? Can you picture the river in your mind as you listen? During its journey it passes the scene of a wedding, goes through rapids and then broadens out as it goes through the city of Prague. Can you identify these scenes in the music?

    Another very famous piece of music is the Blue Danube Waltz by Johann Strauss. Listen to it here. Which of the pieces did you enjoy the most?
    Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
    Physical Education
    Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
    Think of different ways you can move around where it is safe to do so – for example moving at different speeds, changing direction, moving with the weight on different parts of your body e.g. on one foot, on your hands and knees, by rolling. How many different ways can you find? Sequence six or more of these movements together.Use running, jumping … in isolation and in combination.

    Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance.