Resources for Teachers

These activities are intended for use by class teachers to support planning for home learning activities across the primary phase. Activities are linked to Early Learning Goals and National Curriculum objectives.

Class teachers will need to consider whether learners are familiar with the concepts needed to engage with these activities. Where this is not the case, they will need to provide opportunities for learners to encounter the necessary knowledge and skills.  For example, where an activity requires learners to construct a graph, teachers will need to provide opportunities for learners to engage with the concept to ensure they have the skills and knowledge required to complete the task.

Not every curriculum area is represented in every year group. Activities have been provided where there is a meaningful link to curriculum content for that year group.

Activities can be moved between year groups with modifications to suit the level of challenge that may be required.

EYFS

Communication and Language
[Listening & Attention, Understanding & Speaking]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
1. Use the language of first, next, then, finally to describe the planting of the seeds.

2. Making soup - Oliver’s Grandad grew lots of vegetables. Could you make a vegetable soup? Name and discuss the appearance of the vegetables? Can you peel and cut the vegetables safely? [Save the carrot tops, onion top, a piece of celery or potato]. Taste the vegetables if safe when raw - how do they change when cooked?

3. How are you going to season your soup? Talk about how long your soup needs to cook for. Discuss composting the peelings. Share your soup with someone else and enjoy!

4. Answer how and why questions linked to the seeds and begin to ask them.
ELG 01 - Listening and attention:
Children listen attentively in a range of situations.
They listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions.
They give their attention to what others say and respond appropriately, while engaged in another activity.

ELG 02 - Understanding:
Children follow instructions involving several ideas or actions.
They answer ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events.

ELG03 - Speaking
Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs.
They use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are to happen in the future.
They develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.
Physical Development
[Moving & Handling, Health & Self Care]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
1. Making vegetable soup - Can you peel and cut the vegetables safely?

2. Using tools safely

  • Using tools. Discuss how and why they should be tidying up when making something in the kitchen or working in the garden.

  • Using knives or peelers safely with an awareness of others.


3. Using pencils for drawing or writing about their seeds to capture the growth.
ELG04 - Moving and handling
Children show good control and co‑ordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment and tools effectively, including pencils for writing.

ELG 05 - Health and self-care:
Children know the importance for good health of physical exercise and a healthy diet and talk about ways to keep healthy and safe.
They manage their own basic hygiene and personal needs successfully, including dressing and going to the toilet independently.
Personal, Social & Emotional Development
[Self Confidence & Self Awareness, Managing Feelings & Behaviour, Making Relationships]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
1. Soup Making – discuss the need for hygiene. Choose the ingredients and the tools you will need. Talk confidently to someone else about this task.

2. Discuss how we should look after our environment with a focus on minibeasts. Understand that we need to respect the feelings of others, and how minibeasts should be treated. Encourage children to consider how their actions might impact on others and help them to show sensitivity and empathy. Consider making a bug hotel to look after the minibeasts.

3. Sunflower House by Eve Bunting. In the book, the sunflowers were planted in a circle. How would you like to plant the sunflowers? Talk to someone else about your ideas.

4. Talk about the life cycle of a seed, ladybird, butterfly or spider. Share how they change over time.
ELG06 - Self-confidence and self-awareness
Children are confident to try new activities and say why they like some activities more than others.
They are confident to speak in a familiar group, will talk about their ideas, and will choose the resources they need for their chosen activities.
They say when they do or don’t need help.

ELG07 - Managing feelings and behaviour
Children talk about how they and others show feelings, talk about their own and others’ behaviour, and its consequences, and know that some behaviour is unacceptable.
They work as part of a group or class and understand and follow the rules.
They adjust their behaviour to different situations and take changes of routine in their stride.

ELG08
Making relationships:
Children play co-operatively, taking turns with others.
They take account of one another’s ideas about how to organise their activity.
They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings and form positive relationships with adults and other children.
Literacy
[Reading & Writing]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
1. Recommended texts:

  • What the Ladybird Heard, Julia Donaldson

  • Sunflower House, Eve Bunting

  • The Tiny Seed, Eric Carle

  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle

  • The Street Beneath My Feet, Charlotte Guillain

  • The Very Busy Spider, Eric Carle

  • The Bad-tempered Ladybird, Eric Carle

  • Oliver’s Vegetables, Vivien French

  • Jasper’s Beanstalk, Nick Butterworth

  • Planting a Rainbow, Lois Ehlert

  • Superworm, Julia Donaldson. James McAvoy reads it on CBeebies.


2. Planting seeds - write labels for your pots. Write a daily diary about the growth of your seed. Draw a picture to illustrate your diary.

3. Choose a minibeast. Write sentences about your chosen minibeast's life cycle to explain the process.

4. Choose a stone to decorate, can you turn it into a minibeast. Write some simple instructions so that someone else can make a different minibeast.

ELG09 - Reading
Children read and understand simple sentences.
They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately.
They also read some common irregular words.
They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.

ELG10 - Writing
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds.
They also write some irregular common words.
They write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly, and others are phonetically plausible.
Mathematics
[Numbers / Shape Space & Measures]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
1. Go on a minibeast hunt. Discuss how you are going to record your findings by using a tally or by drawing. Examine everything closely.

  • How many different minibeasts can you find?

  • Look and count the number of legs.

  • Use comparative language such as smaller, smallest etc. to compare the minibeasts.


2. Planting Seeds

  • How many seeds are there? Make groups of 10 seeds, count in tens to check how many seeds.

  • Agree how many seeds should be planted in each pot and plant accordingly.

  • You could use the bottom of an empty plastic bottle to plant into or a plastic fruit container.

  • You could plant the seeds in rows if appropriate.

  • Measure the growth of your plants.

  • If you haven’t got any seeds why not save seeds from apples, tomatoes and oranges and have a go at growing them.


3. Role Play

  • Make a garden centre role play area.

  • Price up the objects and practise buying and selling the objects.

  • Make signs and labels to price the items.


4. Decorate a stone

  • Is it symmetrical? [ladybird/butterfly]

  • Use positional language to describe where you have hidden it.


5. Make a symmetrical butterfly or ladybird outside using sticks and anything else to hand.
ELG11 - Numbers
Children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20, place them in order and say which number is one more or one less than a given number.
Using quantities and objects, they add and subtract two single-digit numbers and count on or back to find the answer.
They solve problems, including doubling, halving and sharing.

ELG12 - Shape, space and measures. Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems.
They recognise, create and describe patterns.
They explore characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language to describe them.
Understanding the World
[People & Communities, The World, Technology]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
1. Oliver's Grandad grew lots of vegetables. Could you make a vegetable soup? Name and discuss the appearance of the vegetables? Can you peel and cut the vegetables safely? [Save the carrot tops, onion top, a piece of celery or potato.] Taste if safe when raw, how do they change when cooked? How are you going to season your soup? Talk about how long your soup needs to cook for. Discuss composting the peelings? Share your soup with someone else and enjoy!

2. Lifecycle of plants

  • Take photos and/or draw a picture of your seed growing.

  • Discuss the stages of plant growth.

  • Discuss what a seed needs to grow. Experiment with no water, light or soil and observe what happens.

  • Make sure that you make reference to these changes in your daily diary.

  • Place a flower in some water with food dye. Observe what happens to the colour of the flower as it draws up the water.


3. Lifecycle of a minibeast e.g. a ladybird, butterfly, spider. Research information about bug hotels in books or on the internet. Record the lifecycle of your chosen minibeast in any way that you wish.

4. Create your own simple bug hotel. With an adult look at images of bug hotels on the internet.

5. Woodland Wonders - Steve Backshall
Elements of Steve Backshall’s Woodland Wonders episode may be of use within this topic.

Ensure that you discuss any hazards or health and safety issues when collecting objects in the environment e.g. not putting berries in your mouth unless it is safe to do so.
ELG14 - The world:
Children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things.
They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another.
They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur and talk about changes.

ELG15 - Technology
Children recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools. They select and use technology for particular purposes.

ELG17 - Being imaginative:
They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories.
Expressive Arts & Design
[Exploring and using Media and Materials, Being Imaginative]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal

1. Oliver's Grandad grew lots of vegetables. Could you make a vegetable soup?

  • Look very carefully at the vegetables and observe closely. Can you draw some detailed pictures of the vegetables?

  • Name and discuss the appearance of the vegetables? Use your saved carrot tops, onion top, a piece of celery or potato. Use these for printing or drawing.


2. Make a collection of objects from your garden or outside that interest you. Make an interest table or tray. E.g. a seed head, an empty snail shell, a petal, an interesting stone etc. Add to your collection over several days. Talk about your collection. Which is your favourite object and why?

3. Can you plant some vegetable and sunflower seeds? Decide how and where you are going to plant them.

4. Choose a stone to decorate. Can you turn it into a minibeast? Write some simple instructions so that someone else can make it.

5. Useful links to rhymes and songs:

ELG16 - Exploring and using media and materials
Children sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them.
They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.

ELG17 - Being imaginative:
Children use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about uses and purposes.
They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories.

Year 1

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Collins Connect

Select teacher and sign in;

username - parents@harpercollins.co.uk
password - Parents20!

Find Collins Big Cat Red B and select Jack and the Beanstalk. Before you read the story, talk about what you think might happen. Do you know what a beanstalk it?

Complete the activity at the end of the book by putting all the events in the correct order. Now tell the story to someone else.
Understand both the books he/she can already read accurately and fluently and those he/she listens to by checking that the text makes sense as he/she reads and corrects inaccurate reading.

Develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, retelling them and considering their particular characteristics.
Go to BBC Teach - listen to one of the episodes every day to build up the story. How do you think Jack and mum are feeling at different times in the story – for example when Daisy stops giving them milk?
When you have watched all the episodes think about each of the characters in the story - use the character pictures on the website to help you. Who is your favourite character?

Can you complete the sequencing activity by putting all the pictures in the correct order?
Understand both the books he/she can already read accurately and fluently and those he/she listens to by making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done.

Develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, retelling them and considering their particular characteristics.
Go to PhonicsPlay Comics and choose the Phase 3 story Cow and Owl Town. Use your phonic skills to help you read the story.Read aloud accurately books that are consistent with developing phonic knowledge and that do not require use of other strategies, such as guessing words from pictures or the context of the sentence, to work out words.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the pictures from the sequencing activity on BBC Bitesize, re-write the story of Jack and the Beanstalk in your own words. Try and write a sentence for each picture - it might take you a few days to do this. Don’t forget to use full stops, questions marks and exclamation marks where you need them.

As you are writing your story remember to use a capital letter for someone’s name as well as at the beginning of a sentence.

Use your phonic skills to help you with your spelling.
Compose and write sentences independently to convey ideas.

Write sentences, sequencing them to form short narratives (real or fictional).

Form capital letters.

Segment spoken words into phonemes and represent them with graphemes, spelling some correctly and making phonically plausible attempts at others.
Imagine that you have been given some beans to plant. What would you need to do in order to plant them? Can you write a list of instructions? You might start with Dig a hole in the ground.Spell a few common exception words (e.g. I, the, he, said, of).
If you had been Jack and had found a lot of gold, what would you do with it? Make a list of seven things you would spend your money on - one for each day of the week. Write the day of the week and what you would do or buy that day.

Write the list as neatly as you can.
Spell the days of the week.

Form lower-case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
As you are writing your story (of Jack and the Beanstalk), remember to use a capital letter for someone’s name as well as at the beginning of a sentence.Use a capital letter for names of people, places, the days of the week, and the personal pronoun I.
In your story don’t forget to use full stops, questions marks and exclamation marks where you need them.Begin to punctuate work using question marks and exclamation marks.
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Retell and talk about the story of Jack and the Beanstalk. Is that a good title for the story?Discuss the significance of the title and events.
Tell someone about the list of what you would do or buy each day if you had a lot of gold to spend.Recognise and use language relating to dates, including days of the week, weeks, months and years.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Use your garden centre role play area.
With permission, add some real coins to your role play area. Can you name all of these coins? Can you use them to buy and sell objects?

Make a sign to show when you open and close - you could even add some clock faces. Don’t forget to add the days of the week in order. Can you work out how many hours you are open? Set an alarm clock to go off on the hour or half hour as you have a job to do; can you read the time on the clock face?
Recognise and know the value of different denominations of coins and notes.
Count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals.

Tell the time to the hour and half past the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.
Planting seeds
Find some seeds. They might be so small you may have to use some tweezers! Calculate how many seeds there are by placing them in groups of 2, 5 or 10. Count in these multiples to find out how many you have in total.
Count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals; count in multiples of twos, fives and tens.
Comparing heights of plants
Take a walk in your garden or park. Find your favourite plant. Can you find one shorter/taller? Which is the shortest/tallest plant in the garden? Can you measure the height? If it is too tall, can you make an estimate?
Compare, describe and solve practical problems for: lengths and heights.
Growth Diary

  • Plant at least 3 sunflowers or runner beans.

  • Observe your plants growing and chart their growth.

  • Note the date and measure them carefully every day. Record the heights.

  • Update your diary if there are any changes with a sentence or two and a picture. You could also chart their growth using photos.

  • Discuss your plants using the language shorter than, taller than, tallest, shortest etc.

Compare, describe and solve practical problems for: lengths and heights.

Measure and begin to record the following: lengths and heights.

Count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals
Number Bond Sunflowers

  • Draw a circle and place a 10 or 20 inside it.

  • Draw some large petals around the outside.

  • Inside every petal place a number bond. E.g. 10 in the centre might have 10+ 0, 9+1, 8+2, 7+3 etc. placed in the petals.

Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Watch this video from BBC Bitesize.

Talk about it with an adult. Together, write down or draw some of the things that you know about plants.
Identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees.
Use an online children's dictionary to find out the meaning of these words:

  • Roots

  • Stem

  • Trunk

  • Leaf

  • Bud

  • Flower

  • Blossom

  • Petal

  • Branch

  • Fruit


Create a drawing of a plant or use a photograph of a flower. Use the words above to label the parts of the plant.
Identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees.
Go into your garden, or for a walk around your area. Find trees. Use this chart to see if you can work out what type of trees you have found.Identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to the story about Van Gogh and his Sunflowers.

Look at Vincent van Gogh Sunflowers

Can you draw and paint your own sunflowers in the style of Van Gogh?
Use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.

Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Know about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
How many different shades of green can you mix using paint?Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Draw, paint or make a collage picture that show which vegetables grow under or above the ground.Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and make a garden centre role play area.

  • If you can, visit a garden centre to see what they sell and how it is organised.

  • Plan what you would like to sell in your garden centre.

  • What signs will you need?

  • Add a clock as you will need to know the time!

  • Gather items together and set up your role play area.

  • Invite someone else into your garden centre and use it. Think how you could improve it and make it even better.

Design

  • Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.

  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.


Make

  • Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.


Evaluate

  • Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.

  • Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.

Design a seed packet for a vegetable or flower of your choice.

You could then put it into your role play area. Why not design some more!
When designing remember to:

  • Explore any seed packets you have at home or online.

  • Draw a picture or take a photograph that is going to attract your customers.

  • Clearly display the name of the flower on the front and the price. Maybe include a caption to attract customers e.g. bright and colourful.

  • On the back include information about the number of seeds, a brief description of the plant, sowing instructions, a best before date and a bar code!

Design

  • Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.

  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.


Make

  • Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].

  • Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.


Evaluate

  • Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.

  • Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.

Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at some pictures of the following. You might have books with pictures in, or you could get an adult to find some pictures on the internet.

  • Asian desert

  • South American rain forest

  • African grassland


Talk with an adult about what the plants look like in these places. How are they different? Why do you think they are different?
Look on a map of the world. Can you find where these places might be? Can you find other places that have deserts, rain forests or grassland? Which continents are they in?
Write some sentences to explain what you have found out.
Name and locate the world’s seven continents.

Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to vegetation and weather.
Using a map or globe, find the Equator and the North and South Poles. Is the weather in these areas hot or cold?

Read What is a rainforest habitat?
What did you learn about the Amazon Rain Forest, particularly the weather and the vegetation?

Now read What is a polar habitat?
What have you found out about the weather and the vegetation in Polar habitats?

Which of the two areas would you most like to visit and why?
Identify the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.

Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to key physical features, forest, vegetation and weather.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Songs for Teaching and learn the song with the help of the recording of the first part of the song. Can you add some actions to the song?Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.

Year 2

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Sign up for Oxford Owl and go to eBooks. Select and read Pizza Patch in the 6-7 age group. Before reading predict what the book might be about. As you read the book does your prediction change at all?

Go to the Contents page (2 – 3). On which pages will you find A Lot of Rot and The Scarecrow? Do you know what a glossary and index are? Go to the back of the book to see if you are right. Look through the glossary to check that you can read all of the words and you know what they mean. Look out for them as you read the book.
Now read the book clicking on the round icons for more information, activities and some questions.

Was your prediction about what the book might be about correct?
Understand both the books that he/she can already read accurately and fluently and those that he/she listens to by making plausible predictions about what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far.

Explain what has happened so far in what he/she has read.


Develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by discussing and clarifying the meanings of words, linking new meanings to known vocabulary.

Understand both the books that he/she can already read accurately and fluently and those that he/she listens to by answering and asking questions and making links.
Practise your phonics by going to PhonicsPlay Comics and reading the story about a meal out.Continue to apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent.

Recognise alternative sounds for graphemes.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Plan and write a story in which fruit and vegetables play a part – you could model it on a well - known story such as The Enormous Turnip or Handa's Surprise or compose your own story. Write your story in the present tense, as though it is happening now, sustaining the tense throughout the story.

As you write check that your letters are the correct size in relation to one another with clear ascenders, descenders and capita letters.
Use present and past tense mostly correctly and consistently.

Use the progressive form of verbs in the present and past tense to mark actions in progress e.g. she is drumming, he was shouting.

Form lower-case letters of the correct size relative to one another in most of his/her writing.
Think of your favourite fruit or vegetable. Jot down some words which describe what it looks like, what it feels like and how it tastes. Now put those words together to create a poem - try to make it sound so wonderful to your reader that it makes them lick their lips!Write poetry to develop positive attitudes and stamina for writing.

Use expanded noun phrases for description and specification e.g. the blue butterfly, plain flour, the man in the moon.
Go to Spellingframe Year 2 and lessons 25 and 26. Play some of the activities and then take the test.Spell most words with contracted forms
Spell by learning the possessive apostrophe (singular) e.g. the girl's book.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
P4 of the Pizza Patch uses the words It's twice. Why is there an apostrophe in this word? It tells us that a letter is missing - what is the missing letter?
On p15 the word Today's has an apostrophe for a different reason – to show that the menu belongs to today.

Go to Learning by Questions @ Home and find and complete the punctuation lessons from the March 30th and April 6th weeks.
Use apostrophes to mark where letters are missing in spelling and to mark singular possession in nouns e.g. the girl's name.
Plan and write a story in which fruit and vegetables play a part - you could model it on a well - known story such as The Enormous Turnip or Handa's Surprise or compose your own story. Write your story in the present tense, as though it is happening now, sustaining the tense throughout the story.Use present and past tense mostly correctly and consistently.

Use the progressive form of verbs in the present and past tense to mark actions in progress e.g. she is drumming, he was shouting.
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using what you have learnt about growing vegetables in The Pizza Patch describe the step by step process to a friend or someone in your family using the phone or internet if is not someone that lives with you.Discuss the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Growth Diary

  • Plant at least 3 sunflowers or runner beans.

  • Observe your plants growing and chart their growth in centimetres.

  • Note the date and measure it carefully every day. Record the heights.

  • Use comparative language to compare the heights.

  • On sunflower seed packets it states how tall it might grow. Did your sunflower grow as tall? Was it taller or shorter?

Compare, describe and solve practical problems for lengths and heights [for example, long/short, longer/shorter, tall/short, double/half].
Spend, spend, spend…
Gather together a collection of objects that could be sold in a garden centre. Price them up with different totals up to 50p.
Choose two items to buy.

  • Calculate how much you would have to pay.

  • Which coins could you use exactly to pay this amount?

  • If you paid with a £1 coin how much change would you get?
    Now choose one item that you would like to buy.

  • How many different ways could you pay this amount by using different combinations of coins?

Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including:

  • a two-digit number and ones

  • a two-digit number and tens

  • two two-digit numbers.


Find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money.
Planting sweetcorn
Sweetcorn should always be planted in a grid. Use your knowledge of arrays to work out how you could plant different numbers of seeds.
E.g. 20 sweetcorn seeds could be planted in 10 rows of 2, which could be written as 10 x 2 = 20
Array Grid
or they could be planted in 4 row of 5. 4 x 5 = 20

What would the array [pattern of sweetcorn seeds] look like?
Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables.

Solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts.
You have 12 tomato plants.

  • You want to give 14 of these plants to a friend. How many do you give away and how many do you keep?

  • Draw a picture, a part-part whole model or a bar model to show your thinking.

  • Then you change your mind to 24 , then 34 and then a 13 . Work out how many plants you would keep and give away in these situations if you had 12 plants.

Recognise, find, name and write fractions 13 , 14 , 24 , 34 of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity and know that all parts must be equal parts of the whole.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Buy a tomato and scoop out the seeds inside. Plant this in a pot with some soil / compost. Place it on a windowsill. Make sure that you water the seeds - regularly but not with too much water. They should start to grow (it may take a week or two before you can see small tomato plants appear. After a few more weeks, you could put the plant outside. Make a weekly diary of your tomato plant. Measure their height every week as it grows. You could draw the plant every week or take a digital photograph. Record in which week the flowers appear. Can you keep growing your plant until the fruit (the tomatoes) also start to grow?Observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants.
Create a diagram of the lifecycle of a tomato plant, from seed to seedling, to young plant, to flowering plant, to plant with fruit. You could draw pictures or take photographs of your own tomato plant that you are growing and use these in your lifecycle. You could look here for ideas about how to set out your diagram or Life Cycle of a Plant.Observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants.
Plant up two more pots of tomato seeds. Place one pot on the windowsill and one in a cupboard. Make sure that you water both pots with the same amount of water and at the same time - remember not to use too much water or you might drown the seeds. Which of the pots do you think will germinate and grow? Why do you think this? Write a few sentences to record your prediction. Record what you see happening each week in a growth diary.

Maybe pot up some more seeds and put them in different places. How about in the fridge? Outside in the shade? What might happen to these seeds? How about planting some seeds but not giving them any water? What do you think might happen?
Find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Tomatoes!
Before you remove the seeds for your science task, observe very closely the tomato. If you have a magnifying glass use this to look at all the detail.
Draw a picture of what the tomato looks like through the magnifying glass.
Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Van Gogh's Sunflowers
Listen to the story about Van Gogh and his Sunflowers.

Look at Vincent van Gogh Sunflowers.

Can you draw and paint your own sunflowers in the style of Van Gogh?
Use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.

Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
How many different shades of green can you mix with paint?Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Draw, paint or make a collage picture that show which vegetables grow under or above the ground.Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and make a garden centre role play area.

  • If you can, visit a garden centre to see what they sell and how it is organised.

  • Plan what you would like to sell in your garden centre.

  • What signs will you need?

  • Add a clock as you will need to know the time!

  • Gather items together and set up your role play area.

  • Invite someone else into your garden centre and use it. Think how you could improve it and make it even better.

Design

  • Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.

  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.


Make

  • Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].

  • Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.


Evaluate

  • Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.

  • Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.


Technical knowledge
  • Build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable.

  • Explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.

Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at some pictures of the following. You might have books with pictures in, or you could get an adult to find some pictures on the internet.

  • Asian desert

  • South American rain forest

  • African grassland


Talk with an adult about what the plants look like in these places. How are they different? Why do you think they are different?
Look on a map of the world. Can you find where these places might be? Can you other places that have deserts, rain forests or grassland? Which continents are they in?
Write some sentences to explain what you have found out.
Name and locate the world’s seven continents.

Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to vegetation and weather.
Using a map or globe, find the Equator and the North and South Poles. Is the weather in these areas hot or cold?

Read What is a rainforest habitat?
What did you learn about the Amazon Rain Forest, particularly the weather and the vegetation?

Now read What is a polar habitat?
What have you found out about Polar habitats?

Now read What is a woodland habitat?
This is the habitat that we live in. What have you found out about woodland habitats?

Vegetation is the word we use for the plants and trees which grow in an area. Can you describe the soil and vegetation in the three areas you have studied? What is the weather like in these areas - do they all have four seasons like we do?
Identify the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.

Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to key physical features, including forest, soil, vegetation, season and weather.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Songs for Teaching and learn the song with the help of the recording of the first part of the song. Can you add some actions to the song?Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.

Year 3

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Collins Connect, select Teacher and sign in
username - parents@harpercollins.co.uk
password - Parents20!

In the colour band list click More, select Lime and choose The Cloud Forest. What do you think the book is about? What is a cloud forest?

As you read or listen to the book jot down all the facts you discover about cloud forests, for example how tall the trees are, what an elfin cloud forest is, and which animals and insects live in cloud forests.

Notice the different ways in which the information is presented e.g. labels, diagrams, bullet points. See how many different ways you can find. Does this help the reader to understand the text and take in all the information?

At the end of the book is a glossary - when you get to it check that you understand all of the words listed. Can you use each of them in a sentence?

When you have read the book click on the circle with ticks and crosses in it in order to answer some questions about that you have read.
Understand what he/she reads independently by checking that the text makes sense to him/her, discussing his/her understanding of words.

Understand what he/she reads independently by identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning to include paragraphs, headings, sub-headings, inverted commas to punctuate speech.

Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Reread pages 22 - 31 on Cloud Forests in Danger which talks about the current to cloud forests and their importance to the environment. Make a list of reasons why cloud forests are in danger and another list of reasons why they are so important.

Plan your writing by linking together similar reasons, for example the way the forests have been destroyed by animals including grazing cattle and pigs.

Now write a report arguing against the destruction of the cloud forests. Start a new paragraph for each new aspect of the argument. Think carefully about your word choices choosing words which will strengthen your argument. Appropriately placed questions could also be used to support your case. Use headings and subheadings within your report.
Draft and write by organising writing into paragraphs as a way of grouping related material.

Use headings and subheadings to aid presentation.
Read your work aloud as though you were delivering it as a speech - once you have practised it find an audience to present it to.Read his/her own writing aloud, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.
Go to Spellingframe Year 3 / 4 and lists 25 and 26. Play some of the activities and then take the test.Spell words that are often misspelt (English Appendix 1).
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write a report arguing against the destruction of the cloud forests. Start a new paragraph for each new aspect of the argument. Think carefully about your word choices choosing words which will strengthen your argument. Appropriately placed questions could also be used to support your case.Begin to use paragraphs as a way to group related material.

Use headings and subheadings to aid presentation.
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read your work aloud as though you were delivering it as a speech - once you have practised it find an audience to present it to.Read aloud his/her own writing using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Make multiplication flowers.

Multiplication Flower

Multiplication Flower

On one side of each petal there is a multiplication fact. On the other side there is the solution.

Use these to help you memorise your multiplication tables.

Make one for each multiplication table that you are learning or have learned. This is probably the 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 and 10 times tables.

Can you make them for other tables and start learning those?
Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4 and 8 multiplication tables.
Some seeds disperse using the wind to carry them. Many of these, like the seeds of the sycamore tree, have evolved to have ‘blades’ that stick out and spin around as the seed is falling, helping it travel to the ground. They look a bit like a helicopter’s blades.

This video shows how to make a paper helicopter.

Accurately draw this and use this as the template for your helicopter:

Helicopter Template

Time how long your helicopter takes to reach the ground.

Make different helicopters with different lengths of blades. Create a table to show how long it takes each of them to reach the floor. Do the helicopters with bigger blades take longer? What is the difference in time between different sizes of helicopters?

What happens if you use different weights or thicknesses of paper?
Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including:

  • a two-digit number and ones

  • a two-digit number and tens

  • two two-digit numbers.


Find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money.
Create an Flowerus Angularium (an angular flower). Choose your own shapes to include on the flower – can you name them and explain their properties to an adult?

Mark some of the angles on the flower. Identify whether these are acute (smaller than a right angle), obtuse (greater than a right angle), or whether the angles are right angles.

Flowerus Angularium

NB - Flowerus Angularium is a made-up name. Please don’t ask for these at the local garden centre.
Identify whether angles are greater than or less than a right angle.
Imagine you were going to create a flower bed or a series of planters to go on to your windowsill. You want your flowers to be bee friendly. You have a budget of £20.00.

Visit this website for a Garden Centre.
How might you spend your £20.00?

Come up with different plans. How much change do you have left over when you have finished? (Gardening is hot work, so you might need some cash for an ice cream…)
Add and subtract amounts of money to give change, using both £ and p in practical contexts.

Add and subtract numbers with up to three digits, using formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction.
Select five images of flowers from this website.

Ask people at home and / or family or friends who you can contact through video chats to rank these plants in order, from the one that they think is the most attractive to the one that they like the least.
For a person’s favourite flower, give it five points. For their next favourite give it four and so on, until you get to their least favourite, which will be worth one point.

Total up the points for each type of flower. Create a graph or chart to show the number of points awarded to each flower.
Present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Get a grown up to buy a bunch of cut flowers to brighten up your home. If you can, see if you can get hold of white or yellow flowers. Put them in a vase at home, but make sure that the water in the vase contains lots and lots of blue or red food colouring. Leave the flowers for a few days and look closely at the stem, leaves and petals of the flower. You should be able to see small blue or red lines and patches starting to appear.

What do you think this tells you?

A stick of celery works really well for this as well.

This video also shows what should happen.

This video explains what is happening.

Write a short paragraph to explain what has happened and why.
Investigate the way in which water is transported in plants.

Identify the functions of different parts of flowering plants.
Find out about how flowers are structured and what the different parts of a flower are called. You could start by looking here.

Create a diagram that shows a flower, labels the main parts of the flower, and tells us what each part of the flower is for.

You will need to find out about and include these words:

  • Sepal

  • Ovule / Ovary

  • Stamen

  • Anther

  • Filament

  • Pistil

  • Stigma

  • Style

  • Petal

Identify the functions of different parts of flowering plants.
What is pollination? Create a short paragraph to explain what it is.

Start by looking here for information.

If you have access to a phone or digital camera, go into your garden or on a walk around your area. Find a flowering plant. Can you film bees and other insects visiting the flowers? Can you see pollen baskets on the legs of bees? This is the pollen that they are carrying from one plant to another. Find out about this here.
Explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.
Seeds are dispersed (or moved about) in different ways.

Start by watching this video clip.

How many different ways are there that plants use to move their seeds? Look here to find out some information.

Can you find the names of some plants and trees that use each of the different methods of seed dispersal?

Decide how to share your information about seed dispersal. You could make a poster, write a section for an information book, or how about a PowerPoint presentation?
Explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find out some facts about Claude Monet and present them in any way that you wish. It could be a power point, a poster, a video or an information text.Learn about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Look at painting Le Jardin de l’artiste a Giverny [The Artist’s Garden at Giverny].

Can you paint your own garden or a park close to you in the style of Claude Monet?
Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
How many different shades of green can you mix with paint?Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Watch the YouTube clip The Window by Jeannie Baker.

  • Look out of your window.

  • What can you see?

  • How do you think it looked in the past?

  • How do you think it might change in the future?


Can you create a collage of what the view might look like in the past or future?

  • Find as many different textures as you can to create your collage.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and make a miniature garden.

This could be your dream garden, or it could be a fairy garden. You decide!

Look at the links below for some research and inspiration.

Sketch and plan your miniature garden before you start considering the resources you have to hand.

Equipment you might need:

  • Flat containers such as shallow dishes or seed trays

  • Potting compost, plants and seeds

  • Collected natural materials such as moss, pines cones and twigs

  • Miniature figures or toys fitting the theme

  • Modelling clay, lollypop sticks and gravel

Design

  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.


Make

  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.


Evaluate

  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.

  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.

Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Every county in Great Britain has a flower that is the emblem of that county.

A list can be found here.

Find your county. What is the flower for your county?
Choose four more counties. Find out their flowers.

For each flower, write a short paragraph, either by hand or using the computer. Include a picture of the flower. Include information in your paragraph to describe the flower, and to tell the reader about how high the flower can grow and where it grows best.

If you can, find an outline map of the counties of Great Britain. Label each of the five counties that you chose with your description and the picture of the flower.

Outline Map of the Counties of Great Britain
Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom.
Go to BBC Bitesize and watch and read the information about biomes. There is a video, text, photographs and an activity.

Using a map or globe identify the parts of the world where you are most likely to find these biomes. Is there are link between the climate in these areas and the biome?

Choose one of the biomes and find out more about it. Which countries have this sort of biome?
Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to The Children's Music Network and listen to the song. Listen to it again and join in with it.

Can you add an accompaniment using your body (e.g. clapping) or anything around you as a musical instrument?

Look at the list of songs under the heading Trees and Plants - choose another one to listen to and sing along with.
Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.

Year 4

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Collins Connect, select Teacher and sign in
username - parents@harpercollins.co.uk
password - Parents20!

In the colour band list click More, select Lime and choose The Cloud Forest. What do you think the book is about? What is a cloud forest?

As you read or listen to the book, jot down all the facts you discover about cloud forests. For example, how tall the trees are, what an elfin cloud forest is and which animals and insects live in cloud forests.

Notice the different ways in which the information is presented e.g. labels, diagrams, bullet points. See how many different ways you can find. Does this help the reader to understand the text and take in all the information?

If you meet any words you don’t understand use a dictionary or the glossary the end of the book to check meaning. When you get to the glossary check that you understand all of the words listed. Can you use each of them in a sentence?

When you have read the book click on the circle with ticks and crosses in it in order to answer some questions about that you have read.
Retrieve and record information from non-fiction over a wide range of subjects.

Understand what he/she reads independently by checking that the text makes sense to him/her, discussing his/her understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context.

Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that he/she has read.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Reread pages 22 - 31 on Cloud Forests in Danger which talks about the current to cloud forests and their importance to the environment. Make a list of reasons why cloud forests are in danger and another list of reasons why they are so important.

Plan your writing by linking together similar reasons. For example, the way the forests have been destroyed by animals including grazing cattle and pigs.

Now write a report arguing against the destruction of the cloud forests. Start a new paragraph for each new aspect of the argument. Think carefully about your word choices choosing words which will strengthen your argument. Appropriately placed questions could also be used to support your case.
Use paragraphs to organise ideas around a theme.

Draft and write non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices.
Read your work aloud as though you were delivering it as a speech - once you have practised it find an audience to present it to.Confidently read his/her own writing aloud, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.
Go to Spellingframe Year 3 / 4 and lists 25 and 26. Play some of the activities and then take the test.Spell more complex words that are often misspelt for years 3 and 4 (English Appendix 1).
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write a report arguing against the destruction of the cloud forests. Start a new paragraph for each new aspect of the argument. Think carefully about your word choices choosing words which will strengthen your argument. Appropriately placed questions could also be used to support your case.Use paragraphs to organise ideas around a theme.
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Read your work aloud as though you were delivering it as a speech - once you have practised it find an audience to present it to.Read aloud his/her own writing, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Create an Flowerus Angularium (an angular flower). Choose your own shapes to include on the flower - can you name them and explain their properties to an adult?

Mark some of the angles on the flower. Identify whether these are acute (smaller than a right angle), obtuse (greater than a right angle), or whether the angles are right angles.

Flowerus Angularium

NB - Flowerus Angularium is a made-up name. Please don’t ask for these at the local garden centre.
Identify acute and obtuse angles.
Create multiplication and division plants. Select a multiplication table. Draw the stem of the plant. Cut out some leaves. On one side of the leaf write a multiplication or a division calculation. On the back put the solution. Make sure that your tree has a mix of multiplication and division facts. Use your plant to help you learn the multiplication table and associated division facts.

Multiplication and Division Plants

Multiplication and Division Plants
Recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 x 12.
You are going to plan an indoor garden.

You are going to need pots, plants and compost to make your garden. You have an initial budget of £300. Plan what you are going to buy.
Solve addition and subtraction two-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.

Estimate, compare and calculate different measures, including money in pounds and pence.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at a chart that shows different kinds of common flowers. An example might be the one found here.

Use your understanding of sorting diagrams (Carroll or Venn diagrams) – how could these flowers be sorted by different criteria? You could think about colour of flower, shape of petal/leaf, whether they grow with a single flower or several flowers on a stem.

Look on the internet to find out about the leaf shape or height that these flowers grow to. Create a table to show this information. Use this information in your sorting diagrams.
Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways.
Select four flowers from the chart that you used to sort flowering plants.

Create a branching diagram to sort these flowers. Think carefully about the questions.

Your sorting diagram should look like this:

Branching Diagram

Now take eight flowers. Make a different branching diagram to sort these flowers. It might look like this:

Branching Diagram
Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways.

Explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment.
Not all plants are the same. There are many different classifications of plants. Plants that produce seeds are part of a group sometimes called Phanerogams (these are plants that either have flowers to produce seeds, or produce seeds in cones, like pine trees).

Some of the other most commonly used are:

  • Mosses

  • Ferns

  • Algae


Find out information about these different types of plants. You can start with these links:

Decide how to present the information that you find out about these types of plants. You could create a poster, a page for an information book, or a series of slides on PowerPoint.
Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find out some facts about Claude Monet and present them in any way that you wish. It could be a power point, a poster, a video or an information text.Learn about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Look at painting Le Jardin de l’artiste a Giverny [The Artist’s Garden at Giverny].

Can you paint your own garden or a park close to you in the style of Claude Monet?
Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
Watch the YouTube clip The Window by Jeannie Baker.

  • Look out of your window.

  • What can you see?

  • How do you think it looked in the past?

  • How do you think it might change in the future?


Can you create a collage of what the view might look like in the past or future?

  • Find as many different textures as you can to create your collage.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and make a miniature garden.

This could be your dream garden, or it could be a fairy garden. You decide!

Look at the links below for some research and inspiration.

Sketch and plan your miniature garden before you start considering the resources you have to hand.

Equipment you might need:

  • Flat containers such as shallow dishes or seed trays

  • Potting compost, plants and seeds

  • Collected natural materials such as moss, pines cones and twigs

  • Miniature figures or toys fitting the theme

  • Modelling clay, lollypop sticks and gravel

Design

  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.


Make

  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.


Evaluate

  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.

  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.

Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Many countries around the world have flowers or plants as their emblem. England, for example, uses a red rose. Wales uses a daffodil or a leek. Scotland uses a thistle. Northern Ireland uses the flax flower or the shamrock.

Have a look here at a list of flowers and plants used by other countries.

Select a country from each continent of the world. Find out their national flower. Write a short paragraph for each flower, either by hand or using the computer. Include a picture of the flower. Include information in your paragraph to describe the flower, and to tell the reader about how high the flower can grow and where it grows best.

If you can, find an outline map of the world and locate the countries that you have chosen. Label each of the counties that you chose with your description and the picture of the flower.

Outline Map of the World
Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries.
Go to BBC Bitesize and watch and read the information about biomes. There is a video, text, photographs and an activity.

Using a map or globe identify the parts of the world where you are most likely to find these biomes. Is there are link between the climate in these areas and the biome?

Choose two of the biomes and find out more about them. What are the main differences between them? Which countries have this sort of biome?
Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to The Children's Music Network and listen to the song. Listen to it again and join in with it.

Can you add an accompaniment using your body (e.g. clapping) or anything around you as a musical instrument?

Look at the list of songs under the heading Trees and Plants - choose another one to listen to and sing along with. Which song do you like the most and why?
Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.

Year 5

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Sign up for Oxford Owl and go to eBooks.

Select and read The Secret Garden. When you get to the end of the book read about the author Frances Hodgson Burnett and answer the questions about the story.

How would you describe the characters of Mary, Dickon and Colin? In what ways are they the same and how are they different? Which character would you most like to meet and why? The Secret Garden has been made into several films and TV series. Watch one on YouTube or another sources. How does it compare with the book? Which did you enjoy the most?

Look again at p13. How is Mary feeling as she gets near to the secret garden? What do you think the phrases The wind swirled against the weathered garden wall and She steeled herself and stepped inside mean? What do the words compelled and exquisite mean on P15?

What is the impact of these words and phrases on the reader - are they effective?

Make a list of words and phrases used in the book which help to make it come alive to the reader.
Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions.

Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.
Frances Hodgson Burnett wrote two other children’s books Little Lord Fauntleroy and A Little Princess, both of which have also been screened. Watch the films and/or find out more about the stories from looking at reviews of the books. Compare the characters and the plot from the three books - what are the similarities and differences? Would you recommend any of them to a friend - why/why not?Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by identifying and discussing themes and conventions in writing.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the story as your starting point, write a speech given by Mary, Colin or Dickon with the intention that you will perform it during an audition for a new film version of The Secret Garden. Aim to get into character and share your thoughts, feelings and desires through what you write. Make sure that your writing is coherent with one idea following on from another. When you have finished, practise reading it aloud as though you were acting it out. As you read it check that what you have written makes sense and has the desired effect. Edit your work to make it even better.

Indicate degrees of possibility in your speech through the use of adverbs and/or modal verbs.
Plan his/her writing of narratives by considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what the class have read, listened to or seen performed.

Draft and write by linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time e.g. later, place e.g. nearby and number e.g. secondly or tense choices e.g. he had seen her before.

Evaluate and edit by proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning (English Appendix 2).

Indicate degrees of possibility using adverbs e.g. perhaps, surely or modal verbs e.g. might, should, will, must.

Perform his/her own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.
Staying with the same character as your speech, write a letter thanking the film producers for offering you the part and accepting it. Ask for details of the location for filming and the dates that you will be needed. Think about the language you will need to use in this letter.

Now write a letter to a friend telling them about the role. What is different about your style of writing in this letter?
Evaluate and edit by ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing between the language of speech and writing.

Use different verb forms mostly accurately with consideration for audience and purpose.
Go to Spellingframe, select Y5 / 6 and spelling rules 39 and 40. Do some of the activities and, when you think you can spell all the words, take the test.Spell words ending in -ant, -ance/-ancy, -ent, -ence/-ency e.g. transparent/transparency, tolerant/tolerance.
Write a review of The Secret Garden summarising the plot and the main characters and giving it marks out of 10. As you write think about your handwriting and presentation.Write increasingly legibly, fluently and with increasing speed through improving choices of which shape of a letter to use when given choices and deciding whether or not to join specific letters.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the story as your starting point, write a speech given by Mary, Colin or Dickon with the intention that you will perform it during an audition for a new film version of The Secret Garden. Aim to get into character and share your thoughts, feelings and desires through what you write. Make sure that your writing is coherent with one idea following on from another.Use devices to build cohesion within a paragraph e.g. then, after that, this, firstly.
Go to Learning by Questions @ Home and select the activities on modal verbs and degrees of possibility from weeks beginning 6th and 13th April.Indicate degrees of possibility using adverbs e.g. perhaps, surely or modal verbs e.g. might, should, will, must.
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are going to audition for one of the children’s parts in the next film version of The Secret Garden. Get into character and prepare a speech based on the book to present at the audition. Rehearse the speech so you can perform it to an audience without looking at the words. Perform it in front of some of your family - do they think you would get the role?!Perform his/her own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that the meaning is clear.
Look again at p13. How is Mary feeling as she gets near to the secret garden? What do you think the phrases The wind swirled against the weathered garden wall and She steeled herself and stepped inside mean? What do the words compelled and exquisite mean on P15? What is the impact of these words and phrases on the reader - are they effective?Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Create an Flowerus Angularium (an angular flower). Choose your own shapes to include on the flower - can you name them and explain their properties to an adult?

Mark some of the angles on the flower. Identify whether these are acute (smaller than a right angle), obtuse (greater than a right angle), reflex (between 180° and 360°). or if the angles are right angles.

Flowerus Angularium

When you have identified the angles, measure the angles accurately to the nearest degree.

NB - Flowerus Angularium is a made-up name. Please don’t ask for these at the local garden centre.
Know angles are measured in degrees.

Estimate and compare acute, obtuse and reflex angles.

Draw given angles and measure them in degrees.
Here is some data about the amount of the earth that is covered by different biomes:

Biome Data Table

Create a graph to show this data. Use this graph as part of the information text that you are writing about the world’s major biomes.
Complete, read and interpret information in tables.
You are going to bring the outside inside and redecorate a room in your home like an indoor garden. (Well… not really. Just imagine!)

To start with, you will need to replace the floor covering with turf.

Measure the length and width of your chosen room. Find the area of the floor in the room.

Round this to the nearest square metre.

Next, look on this website at the costs of artificial turf.

Work out how much it would cost to "carpet" the room with artificial turf of different kinds.
Calculate and compare the area of rectangles (including squares), and including using standard units, square centimetres (cm2) and square metres (m2).

Multiply numbers up to 4 digits by a one- or two-digit number using a formal written method, including long multiplication for two-digit numbers.
Next, choose some really nice plant pots to stand in the room. Look here for inspiration or check out other gardening websites.Solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.
Your pots will need plants. Select a plant for each of your plant pots here.

Think carefully about the dimensions of the pots and the size of the plants - you don’t want a plant that only grows to be 20cm high in a pot that is a metre across.
Solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.
Work out the total cost of all of the elements for our indoor garden room.

Good news! I am giving you a 25% discount on everything!

What is the cost after the discount?
Recognise the per cent symbol (%) and understand that per cent relates to ‘number of parts per hundred’.

Solve problems which require knowing percentage and decimal equivalents of 12 , 14 , 25 , 45 and those fractions with a denominator of a multiple of 10 or 25.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
A biome is a large area of the Earth that has a certain climate. On Earth, there are several different types of biome. We have deserts, rainforests, temperate areas and several others. In each of these areas, different plants grow.

Look here to find out about different types of biome.

Find out about which types of plants grow in these biomes.

Create an information text to communicate what you have found out.

Identify where these different types of plants grow:

  • Ferns

  • Cacti and succulents

  • Grasses


Find out how each of these plants manages to reproduce and disperse their seeds/spores.

You could begin looking here.
Describe the life process of reproduction in some plants.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Botanical illustrations
Botanical illustrations are incredibly accurate and enable identification of a plant. They are drawn from live plants and typically the illustration will depict ALL relevant aspects of the plant, including the life cycle, that enable accurate identification. It frequently includes relevant dissections for species identification. Over 90% of botanical illustrations are monochrome (black and white).

  • Explore botanical illustrations online.

  • Plan and sketch your own botanical illustration.

  • Choose one to develop further. Can you produce a masterpiece?

Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
Georgia O’Keefe
Research the work of the artist Georgia O’Keefe.

Find out some facts about the Georgia O’Keeffe.

Draw and paint a flower in the style of Georgia O’Keefe.
Learn about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and make a rainwater harvester to water your school or home garden.
Watch this clip from BBC Design Challenge.
Research designs of rainwater harvesters.

  • Can you sketch your own initial ideas?

  • Can you make a prototype model and test it out?


Reflect how you could improve it.
Design

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.

  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.


Make

  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.

  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.


Evaluate

  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.

  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.

Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Print out a blank world map. One can be found here.

Alternatively, create a sketch map of the world. Shade in the map to show the location of some of the world’s major biomes - desert, rain forest, grassland, temperate and tundra. Create a key to show their locations.

You could look here for inspiration.

For each biome, write a description of the climate and the plant life that can be found in each biome. You could start to find information here.
Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.
Go to Ducksters Education Site.

Click on the map to enlarge it. Which biome do we have in the UK? Can you name three other countries which have the same biome? Read the information there is on this biome.

Now choose another biome and find out all you can about that one including which countries have this biome. What sort of vegetation is a feature of this biome?

Is there a link between biomes and climate and, if so, can you explain it?
Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to the recording of Simple Gifts from Aaron Copland's Appalachian Spring Suite.

Now listen to Spring Morning by Frederic Delius. Which of the pieces of music do you like the most and why?
Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.

Year 6

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Sign up for Oxford Owl and go to eBooks.

Select and read The Secret Garden. When you get to the end of the book read about the author Frances Hodgson Burnett and answer the questions about the story.

This version of the story is told as a graphic novel. Do you like reading stories in this format - why/why not?

How would you describe the characters of Mary, Dickon and Colin? In what ways are they the same and how are they different? Which character would you most like to meet and why?

Look again at p13. How is Mary feeling as she gets near to the secret garden? What do you think the phrases The wind swirled against the weathered garden wall and She steeled herself and stepped inside mean? What do the words compelled and exquisite mean on P15?

What is the impact of these words and phrases on the reader - are they effective? Make a list of words and phrases used in the book which help to make it come alive to the reader.
Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.

Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.
Frances Hodgson Burnett wrote two other children’s books Little Lord Fauntleroy and A Little Princess, both of which have also been screened. Watch the films and/or find out more about the stories from looking at reviews of the books. Compare the characters and the plot from the three books - what are the similarities and differences? Would you recommend any of them to a friend - why/why not?Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing.

Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by making comparisons within and across books.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the story as your starting point, write a speech given by Mary, Colin or Dickon with the intention that you will perform it during an audition for a new film version of The Secret Garden. Aim to get into character and share your thoughts, feelings and desires through what you write.

When you have finished, practise reading it aloud as though you were acting it out. As you read it check that what you have written makes sense and has the desired effect. Edit your work to make it even better.
Distinguish between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register.

Evaluate and edit by proposing reasoned changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning (English Appendix 2).

Confidently perform his/her own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.
Staying with the same character as your speech, write a letter thanking the film producers for offering you the part and accepting it. Ask for details of the location for filming and dates. Think about the language you will need to use in this letter.

Now write a letter to a friend telling them about the role. What is different about your style of writing in this letter?
Exercise an assured and conscious control over levels of formality, particularly through manipulating grammar and vocabulary to achieve this.

Understand and use effectively vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing e.g. find out - discover; ask for - request; go in - enter, across a range of text types.
Go to Spellingframe, select Y5 / 6 and spelling rules 48 and 49. Do some of the activities and, when you think you can spell all the words, take the test.Distinguish between homophones and other words which are often confused (English Appendix 1).
Write a review of The Secret Garden summarising the plot and the main characters, identifying what you see as the books strengths and weaknesses and giving it marks out of 10. As you write think about your handwriting and presentation.Write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed by choosing the writing implement that is best suited for a task.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Staying with the same character as your speech write a letter thanking the film producers for offering you the part and accepting it. Ask for details of the location for filming and dates. Think about the language you will need to use in this letter.

Now write a letter to a friend telling them about the role. What is different about your style of writing in this letter?
Exercise an assured and conscious control over levels of formality, particularly through manipulating grammar and vocabulary to achieve this.

Understand and use effectively vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing e.g. find out - discover; ask for - request; go in - enter, across a range of text types.
Go to Learning by Questions @ Home and complete the grammar activity Using appropriate vocabulary in formal and informal texts from week beg 18th May.Exercise an assured and conscious control over levels of formality, particularly through manipulating grammar and vocabulary to achieve this.
Spoken English
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are going to audition for one of the children’s parts in the next film version of The Secret Garden. Get into character and prepare a speech based on the book to present at the audition. Rehearse the speech so you can perform it to an audience without looking at the words. Perform it in front of some of your family - do they think you would get the role?Perform his/her own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that the meaning is clear.
Look again at p13. How is Mary feeling as she gets near to the secret garden? What do you think the phrases The wind swirled against the weathered garden wall and She steeled herself and stepped inside mean? What do the words compelled and exquisite mean on P15?
What is the impact of these words and phrases on the reader - are they effective?
Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including complex figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
You are going to bring the outside inside and redecorate a room in your home like an indoor garden. (Well…not really. Just imagine!)

To start with, you will need to replace the floor covering with turf.

Measure the length and width of your chosen room. Find the area of the floor in the room.

Round this to the nearest square metre.

Next, look on this website at the costs of artificial turf.

Work out how much it would cost to "carpet" the room with artificial turf of different kinds.
Multiply multi-digit numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long multiplication.

Recognise when it is possible to use formulae for area.
Your pots will need plants. Select a plant for each of your plant pots here.

Think carefully about the dimensions of the pots and the size of the plants - you don’t want a plant that only grows to be 20cm high in a pot that is a metre across.
Solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.
Work out the total cost of all of the elements for our indoor garden room.

Good news! I am giving you a 37% discount on everything!

What is the cost after the discount?
Solve problems involving the calculation of percentages [for example, of measures, and such as 15% of 360].
The Earth’s surface is covered by different biomes - areas that have different climatic conditions and where different kinds of plants can, therefore, grow.

Here is information about the percentage of the Earth's surface that is covered by these biomes.

Biome Data Table

The rest of the planet is covered by water.

Create a pie chart to represent this data. You might need to make some decisions about rounding numbers to make this workable.

The Earth's surface is 510 million square kilometres.

How much of the Earth’s surface is covered by each biome, including the area covered by water? You might want to use a calculator to help you in this.
Solve problems involving the calculation of percentages [for example, of measures, and such as 15% of 360] and the use of percentages for comparison.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
A biome is a large area of the Earth that has a certain climate. On Earth, there are several different types of biome. We have deserts, rainforests, temperate areas and several others. In each of these areas, different plants grow.

Look here to find out about different types of biome.

Find out about which types of plants grow in these biomes.

Create an information text to communicate what you have found out.
Explain how plants are adapted to suit their environment.
Focus on the rainforest biome. One major feature of this biome is known as the layers of the rainforest. Find out what this means. You could begin here:

Make sure that you know what is meant by the forest floor, the understory, the canopy layer, and the emergent layer.

How are the plants that grow in these different layers different and why?

Make a model or draw a labelled diagram that shows the layers of the rainforest and the information that you have found out.
Explain how plants are adapted to suit their environment.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Botanical illustrations
Botanical illustrations are incredibly accurate and enable identification of a plant. They are drawn from live plants and typically the illustration will depict ALL relevant aspects of the plant, including the life cycle, that enable accurate identification. It frequently includes relevant dissections for species identification. Over 90% of botanical illustrations are monochrome (black and white).

  • Explore botanical illustrations online.

  • Plan and sketch your own botanical illustration.

  • Choose one to develop further. Can you produce a masterpiece?

Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
Georgia O’Keefe
Research the work of the artist Georgia O’Keefe.

Find out some facts about the Georgia O’Keeffe.

Draw and paint a flower in the style of Georgia O’Keefe.
Learn about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and make a rainwater harvester to water your school or home garden.
Watch this clip from BBC Design Challenge.
Research designs of rainwater harvesters.

  • Can you sketch your own initial ideas?

  • Can you make a prototype model and test it out?


Reflect how you could improve it.
Design

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.

  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.


Make

  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.

  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.


Evaluate

  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.

  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.

Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Print out a blank world map. One can be found here.

Alternatively, create a sketch map of the world. Shade in the map to show the location of some of the world’s major biomes - desert, rain forest, grassland, temperate and tundra. Create a key to show their locations.

You could look here for inspiration.

For each biome, write a description of the climate and the plant life that can be found in each biome. You could start to find information here.
Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.
Go to Ducksters Education Site.

Click on the map to enlarge it. Which biome do we have in the UK? Can you name three other countries which have the same biome? Read the information there is on this biome.

Now choose two other biomes and find out all you can about them including which countries have this sort of biome. What sort of vegetation is a feature of these biomes?

Compare and contrast the three biomes you have studied - what is the same about them and what is different?

Is there a link between biomes and climate and, if so, can you explain it?
Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to the recording of Simple Gifts from Aaron Copland's Appalachian Spring Suite.

Now listen to Spring Morning by Frederic Delius. Which of the pieces of music do you like the most and why?

One of the most famous pieces of music about spring is Spring from The Four Seasons by Vivaldi. In what ways is it similar to/different from, other pieces? Which piece of music do you think was written first?
Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians

Develop an understanding of the history of music.

Book List - KS1

TitleCreator(s)Book ISBNeBook ISBN
How Flowers Grow

How Flowers Grow by Emma Helbrough
Emma Helbrough9780746074503
Pandora

Pandora by Victoria Turnbull
Victoria Turnbull97818478075029781328809636
From a Tiny Seed to a Mighty Tree: How Plants Grow

From a Tiny Seed to a Mighty Tree: How Plants Grow by Ruth Owen
Ruth Owen9781910549773
Jasper's Beanstalk

Jasper’s Beanstalk by Nick Butterworth & Mick Inkpen
Nick Butterworth & Mick Inkpen9781444918151
A Sunflower's Life Cycle

A Sunflower’s Life Cycle by Mary R Dunn
Mary R Dunn97814747433349780192759481
Jack and the Baked Beanstalk

Jack and the Baked Beanstalk by Colin Simpson
Colin Stimpson9781848772373
Eddie's Garden: and How to Make Things Grow

Eddie's Garden: and How to Make Things Grow by Sarah Garland
Sarah Garland9781845070892
Oliver's Vegetables

Oliver’s Vegetables by Vivian French
Vivian French9780340634790Available on Kindle

Book List - KS2

TitleCreator(s)Book ISBNeBook ISBN
Where the River Runs Gold

Where the River Runs Gold by Sita Brahmachari
Sita Brahmachari97815101054169781510105461
Trees, Leaves, Flowers & Seeds: A Visual Encyclopedia of the Plant Kingdom

Trees, Leaves, Flowers & Seeds: A Visual Encyclopedia of the Plant Kingdom
Sarah Jose97802413399239780241445877
Killer Plants and Other Green Gunk

Killer Plants and Other Green Gunk by Anna Claybourne
Anna Claybourne9781445152486
Why Do Plants Have Flowers?

Why do Plants have Flowers?
Pat Jacobs & Julia Bird9781445150871
Experiments with Plants

Experiments with Plants by Isabel Thomas
Isabel Thomas97814062979429781406297997
Bloom

Bloom by Nicola Skinner
Nicola Skinner97800082974049780008297411

Or e-Audio
9780008302429
Jack and the Beanstalk: Graphic Novel

Jack and the Beanstalk: Graphic Novel by Ricardo Terico
Ricardo Tercio9781406243192
The Boy Who Grew Dragons

The Boy who Grew Dragons
Andy Shepherd and Sarah Ogilvie9781848126497Available on Kindle