Resources for Teachers

These activities are intended for use by class teachers to support planning for home learning activities across the primary phase. Activities are linked to Early Learning Goals and National Curriculum objectives.

Class teachers will need to consider whether learners are familiar with the concepts needed to engage with these activities. Where this is not the case, they will need to provide opportunities for learners to encounter the necessary knowledge and skills.  For example, where an activity requires learners to construct a graph, teachers will need to provide opportunities for learners to engage with the concept to ensure they have the skills and knowledge required to complete the task.

Not every curriculum area is represented in every year group. Activities have been provided where there is a meaningful link to curriculum content for that year group.

Activities can be moved between year groups with modifications to suit the level of challenge that may be required.

EYFS

Prime Areas

Communication and Language
[Listening & Attention, Understanding & Speaking]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Build a den type castle in your garden or somewhere in your house. Explain how you made your den to someone else.ELG03 – Speaking
Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. They use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are to happen in the future. They develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.
Compare and contrast your large castle den to a real castle. How are they the same? How are they different?ELG03 – Speaking
Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. They use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are to happen in the future. They develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.
The King or Queen needs some help! They accidentally dropped 10 items into the moat. Some floated and others sank. Decide which 10 objects got dropped. Can you predict, then investigate which objects floated and which sank?
Explain to someone else how you investigated this problem.
ELG03 – Speaking
Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. They use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are to happen in the future. They develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.
Oxford University Press Big Surprise Unit 6 Castle Song with actions

Listen to both songs and sing along. Which words are repeated? Can you memorise the songs? Can you add your own percussion sounds to the songs? You could use a saucepan and a wooden spoon!

Song 1
Song 2
ELG01 – Listening and attention
Children listen attentively in a range of situations. They listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions. They give their attention to what others say and respond appropriately, while engaged in another activity.
Physical Development
[Moving & Handling, Health & Self Care]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Build a den type castle in your garden or somewhere in your house. Practise manipulating string or Sellotape demonstrating your fine motor control. Can you introduce someone else into your space and show them around?ELG04 – Moving and handling
Children show good control and co‑ordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment and tools effectively, including pencils for writing.
Build a smaller replica of your den using any form of construction or clean used food packaging. Use post it notes to label the different parts of your den.ELG04 – Moving and handling
Children show good control and co‑ordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment and tools effectively, including pencils for writing.
Write and send a message to another castle via the knight and his horse.ELG04 – Moving and handling
Children show good control and co‑ordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment and tools effectively, including pencils for writing.
Create a jumping course for the knight’s horse. Build jumps using objects in your garden. Time yourself to see how quickly you can jump on your horse and complete the course. Challenge someone else to see if they can do it faster.ELG04 – Moving and handling
Children show good control and co‑ordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment and tools effectively, including pencils for writing.

Specific Areas

Literacy
[Reading & Writing]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Build a den type castle in your garden or somewhere in your house. Write some instructions for someone else.
Read your instructions to someone else. Can they follow them?
ELG10 – Writing
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds. They also write some irregular common words. They write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly, and others are phonetically plausible.

ELG09 – Reading
Children read and understand simple sentences. They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words. They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.
Paper Bag Princess by Robert Munsch

The Queen’s Knickers

Rapunzel

Don’t forget to explore some non-fiction books about castles.

Use these texts for a starting point for reading and writing tasks.
ELG09 – Reading
Children read and understand simple sentences. They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words. They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.
ELG10 – Writing
Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds. They also write some irregular common words. They write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly, and others are phonetically plausible.
Mathematics
[Numbers / Shape Space & Measures]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Build a den type castle in your garden or somewhere in your house.
Measure how wide and how tall your castle is using your feet or a measuring tape.
Talk about the shapes you can see within your construction.
ELG12 – Shape, space and measures. Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems. They recognise, create and describe patterns. They explore characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language to describe them.
The King or Queen needs some help! They accidentally dropped 10 items into the moat. Some floated and others sank. Decide which 10 objects got dropped.

- Can you find 10 objects?
- Can you sort them into two groups, those that floated and those that sank?
- Decide how you are going to record this.
ELG11 – Numbers
Children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20, place them in order and say which number is one more or one less than a given number. Using quantities and objects, they add and subtract two single-digit numbers and count on or back to find the answer. They solve problems, including doubling, halving and sharing.
Create a jumping course for the knight’s horse. Build jumps using objects in your garden. Time yourself to see how quickly you can jump on your horse and complete the course. Challenge someone else to see if they can do it faster.ELG12 – Shape, space and measures. Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems. They recognise, create and describe patterns. They explore characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language to describe them.
Bake some biscuits or buns for a banquet! Follow a recipe and measure the ingredients carefully.
How long do they need to bake for?
How many buns/cakes did you make?
Decorate your cakes.
Eat some, how many are left?
ELG11 – Numbers
Children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20, place them in order and say which number is one more or one less than a given number. Using quantities and objects, they add and subtract two single-digit numbers and count on or back to find the answer. They solve problems, including doubling, halving and sharing.
ELG12 – Shape, space and measures. Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems. They recognise, create and describe patterns. They explore characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language to describe them.
Understanding the World
[People & Communities, The World, Technology]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Oxford University Press Big Surprise Unit 6 Castle Song with actions.

Record yourself singing one of these songs and send it to a family member or friend that doesn’t live with you.

Song 1
Song 2
ELG15 – Technology
Children recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools. They select and use technology for particular purposes.
Who would live in a castle? Explore people: kings, queens, princes, princesses, knights, servants and jesters. Explore the animals that would have been kept.
How is your home different to a castle?

Why would the castle keep chickens? Discuss the life cycle of a chicken.
ELG14 – The world
Children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another. They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur and talk about changes.
Explore a castle of your choice; one that is close to you and another that is far away.
E.g.
Windsor Castle
Colchester Castle
Alnwick Castle
Edinburgh Castle
Burghausen Castle
ELG14 – The world
Children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another. They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur and talk about changes.
The King or queen needs some help! They accidentally dropped 10 items into the moat. Some floated and others sank. Decide which 10 objects got dropped. Can you predict, then investigate which objects floated and which sank?ELG14 – The world
Children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another. They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur and talk about changes.
Bake some biscuits or buns for a banquet! Follow a recipe and measure the ingredients carefully.
Talk about the similarities and differences of the ingredients. Observe how the mixture changes when baked.
ELG14 – The world
Children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another. They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur and talk about changes.
Expressive Arts & Design
[Exploring and using Media and Materials, Being Imaginative]
Learning TaskLinked Early Learning Goal
Oxford University Press Big Surprise Unit 6 Castle Song with actions.

Listen to both songs and sing along. Which words are repeated? Can you memorise the songs? Can you add your own percussion sounds to the songs? You could use a saucepan and a wooden spoon!

Song 1
Song 2
ELG16 – Exploring and using media and materials
Children sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them. They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.
Can you design a new perfume/after shave fit for a princess or prince? Find a suitable container to mix up your perfume or after shave. With permission use flower petals, spices, food flavourings etc
Share your recipe with someone else? Do they like your fragrance? How could you improve it?
ELG16 – Exploring and using media and materials
Children sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them. They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.
Bake some biscuits or buns for a banquet! Follow a recipe and measure the ingredients carefully.
Use kitchen equipment safely.
ELG16 – Exploring and using media and materials
Children sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them. They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.
Design and create a flag or a shield for a knight.ELG16 – Exploring and using media and materials
Children sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them. They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.

Year 1

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Have you ever been to a castle? If you have what can you remember about your visit? If you haven’t been to a castle can you tell someone what you already know about them. Do you know the names of any parts of the castle?

Go to Collins Connect

Select teacher and sign in;

username - parents@harpercollins.co.uk
password - Parents20!

Select Turquoise and the book Castles.

Listen and follow the text as the book is read to you. Choose the pages you found the most interesting and read them out loud. Use your phonics to help you read unfamiliar words. Re-read the pages again thinking about how your reading sounds.

Tell someone what you have learnt through what you have heard and read.

Do you know what the drawbridge, battlements and tower are and where to find them in a castle? If not check pages 8-9 and 22–23.
Complete the activity at the end of the book.
Understand books he/she can read or has read to them by drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher.

Explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them.

Discuss word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known.
Do you know the story Sleeping Beauty? Why do you think that title was chosen for the story? Listen / read along with the story – there are several versions on YouTube or, if you have a copy of the story, read that.
If you don’t know the story very well listen to it several times. What are the most important things which happen in the story? Then tell the story to someone else – perhaps you could record it and send it to your teacher. Think about the words you will use to describe the princess. Who were the good characters in the story and who were the bad ones?
Discuss the significance of the title and events.

Become very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, retelling them and considering their particular characteristics.
Which phoneme do the letters aw in drawbridge represent? What do you notice about the words prawn and thorn, fraud and lord, for and more. Highlight the part of the words which are the same. Now read these words – drawbridge, trawler, fortune, sporting, August, haunt, chores, before.Read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught.
Read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
In sentences write at least three facts about castles. Check that each sentence makes sense and that it has a full stop and a capital letter.Re-read what they have written to check that it makes sense.
Imagine you are Sleeping Beauty. Write the story of what happened to you saying each sentence out loud before you write it down. Use the word and to join some of your thoughts together. Think about your story in three parts – what happened when you were born, on your birthday and when you woke from your long sleep.Compose a sentence orally before writing it.
Sequence sentences to form short narratives.
Go to Spellingframe and select Year 1. Work through the activities and tests for spelling rules 26 – 29 or, ore, aw, au.

Make a list of words which rhyme with saw and cord. How many different ways of representing /or/ did you use?
Spell words containing each of the 40+ phonemes already taught.

Spell words containing or, ore, aw and au.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
In sentences write at least three facts about castles. Check that each sentence makes sense and that it has a full stop and a capital letter.Begin to punctuate sentences using a capital letter and a full stop, question mark or exclamation mark.
Imagine you are Sleeping Beauty. Write the story of what happened to you saying each sentence out loud before you write it down. Use the word and to join some of your thoughts together.Join words and join clauses using and.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are Sleeping Beauty. Act out the part of the story where you have been woken up. What are the first things you do and say?Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates.
Explain to someone what a drawbridge, tower and battlements are. If you have a picture of a castle you could point to them.Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design a shield using two dimensional shapes. Can you make a pattern or a picture on your shield?Recognise and name common 2-D and 3-D shapes, including: 2-D shapes [for example, rectangles (including squares), circles and triangles].
Compile ‘A day in the life of a knight.’ Use the language before, after, next, first and today.Sequence events in chronological order using language [for example, before and after, next, first, today, yesterday, tomorrow, morning, afternoon and evening].
There are 16 legs in total.
How many knights and horses could that be? The only rule is there needs to be at least one knight.
Solve one-step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems.
Build a castle using construction toys or junk modelling. How many edges and vertices do they have?
Alternatively make a castle picture using shapes. Draw around objects, cut the shapes out and stick them down. Name the shapes you have used and their properties.
Properties of shapes
Recognise and name common 2-D and 3-D shapes, including:
- 2-D shapes [for example, rectangles (including squares), circles and triangles].
- 3-D shapes [for example, cuboids (including cubes), pyramids and spheres].
Pretend to be a marching knight. Write some instructions for marching a route around your house and into your garden if you have one. Focus on the language of turning - whole, half, quarter and three-quarter turns.Describe position, direction and movement, including whole, half, quarter and three-quarter turns.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at photographs and artists’ drawings of castles. What materials do you think castles were built from?
Where in the castles did people use the following to build with?
Stone, wood, straw, clay / earth.
Why do you think people used all of these different materials? Think about their properties.
Identify and name a variety of everyday materials.

Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are Sleeping Beauty. Paint or draw a picture of the dream you had whilst you were asleep.Pupils should be taught:
- to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.
- to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find out what a jester was.

Can you design and make a Jester’s stick? You could decorate a wooden spoon or spatula. See if you can entertain your family like a court jester?

Court Jester
Design
- Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
- Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make
- Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
- Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.
Evaluate
- Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Locate England, Scotland, Wales and N Ireland on a map. Now find the capital cities – London, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast. Windsor Castle, the largest occupied castle in the world, is a few miles west of London. The other cities all have castles in them. Draw a castle symbol on a map of the United Kingdom to show where these castles are.

An outline map of the UK can be found here.
Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find a picture of a castle on the internet and print this out, or draw your own picture of a castle using ideas from pictures on the internet.
Label the important parts of the castle. Use these words – use the internet or ask an adult what they mean and where they are on your picture:
Tower
Gate
Gatehouse
Wall
Keep
Arrow slit
Battlements
Children should be taught about significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to Open the Drawbridge - KS1 song
and There was a Princess Long Ago

Learn the songs and sing them to someone you know.
Can you add some actions to the songs?

Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the song Open the Drawbridge, create a short dance for the king when he enters the castle and for the queen when she does so.Perform dances using simple movement patterns.

Year 2

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Have you ever been to a castle? If you have what can you remember about your visit? If you haven’t been to a castle can you tell someone what you already know about them. Do you know the names of any parts of the castle?

Go to Collins Connect

Select teacher and sign in;

username - parents@harpercollins.co.uk
password - Parents20!

Select Turquoise and the book Castles.

Turn down the volume and read the text aloud. Re-read the book thinking about how your reading sounds.

Tell someone what you have learnt through what you have heard and read.

Do you know what the drawbridge, portcullis, battlements and tower are and where to find them in a castle? If not check pages 8-9 and 22–23.

Can you name any other parts of the castle?

Complete the activity at the end of the book.
Draw on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher.

Explain and discuss their understanding of books, poems and other material, both those they listen to and those that they read for themselves.

Discuss and clarify the meaning of words, linking new meanings to known vocabulary.
Do you know the story Sleeping Beauty? Why do you think that title was chosen for the story? Listen to / read along with the story – there are several versions on You Tube or, if you have a copy of the story read that.
If you don’t know the story very well listen to it several times. What are the most important things which happen in the story? Then tell the story to someone else – perhaps you could record it and send it to your teacher. Think about the words and phrases you will use to describe the princess, the forest and the prince.
Find another version of the story and listen to / read along with it. What are the differences between this and the first story you read?
Discuss the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related.

Become increasingly familiar with and retell a wide range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales.

Discuss the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related.
Which phoneme do the letters aw in drawbridge represent? What do you notice about the words prawn and thorn, fraud and lord, for and more, haul and call, talk and pork. Highlight the part which is the same.
Now read these words flawless, trawler, fortune, scornful, August, haunt, scored, before, always, walked, smallest, taller.
Read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered.

Read words containing common suffixes.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write a short description of a castle using the words drawbridge, tower, battlements and portcullis. Plan the order in which you are going to write about each one. Use conjunctions to join some of your sentences together and make them more interesting. When you have finished check that you have used capital letters and full stops correctly. Can you include a question in your writing?Write down ideas and / or key words, including new vocabulary.

Write for different purposes.
Imagine you are Sleeping Beauty. What do you think it was like to wake up after sleeping for 100 years? What was the same and what was different about the castle and the area round it? Write a few sentences saying what you thought, felt and saw as you woke up. When you have finished read what you have written to check that is makes sense. Choose one sentence and try to improve it, perhaps by using more interesting words or by adding extra details.Writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional).

Re-read to check that their writing makes sense.

Evaluate their writing.
Write your own version of Sleeping Beauty changing some of the details. For example, what made her fall asleep and how she was woken up again. Start your story Once upon a time. When you have finished, check that you have used the correct tense consistently through your story.Write for different purposes.

Re-read to check that their writing makes sense and that verbs to indicate time are used correctly and consistently, including verbs in the continuous form.
Go to Spellingframe and select Year 2. Work through the activities and tests for spelling rule 17 al and all
Make a list of words which rhyme with haul, stork and snore. How many different ways of representing /or/ did you use?
The or sound is usually spelt as a before l and ll.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Write a short description of a castle using the words drawbridge, tower, battlements and portcullis. Use conjunctions to join some of your sentences together and make them more interesting.Use subordination (using when, if, that, or because) and co-ordination (using or, and, or but).
Write a short description of a castle using the words drawbridge, tower, battlements and portcullis. When you have finished check that you have used capital letters and full stops correctly. Can you include a question in your writing?Learn how to use sentences with different forms: statement, question.

Learning how to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly including full stops, capital letters, question marks.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are Sleeping Beauty. Act out the parts of the story where you fall asleep and when you have been woken up. What are the first things you do and say when you wake up?Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates.
Explain to someone what a drawbridge, portcullis, tower and battlements are. If you have a picture of a castle you could point to them.Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Pretend to be a marching knight. Write some instructions for marching a route around your house and into your garden if you have one. Focus on the language of turning - whole, half, quarter and three-quarter turns clockwise and anti-clockwise.Use mathematical vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement, including movement in a straight line and distinguishing between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three-quarter turns (clockwise and anti-clockwise).
Design a shield using two dimensional shapes. Can you make a pattern or a picture on your shield that has a horizontal or vertical line of symmetry?Identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line.
This is a list of the top best Minecraft Castles. Do you, your family and friends agree? Research some pictures to share. Ask friends and family which is their favourite castle.
1. Hear me Roar.
2. Medieval City: Cathedral, Palace, Castle.
3. Thalvon Land of Kings.
4. Vitruvian Castle.
5. The Lonely Castle.
6. Castillo Isla Alta.
7. Epic Medieval Castle.
8. Castle!
Interpret and construct simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables.

Ask and answer simple questions by counting the number of objects in each category and sorting the categories by quantity.

Ask and answer questions about totalling and comparing categorical data.
Write some of your own multiplication and division multi-step word problems based on knights' and horses' legs. Work out the answers and keep them safe. Give someone else your multi-step problem and see if they can solve them.Solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look at photographs and artists' drawings of castles. What materials do you think castles were built from?

Where in the castles did people use the following to build with?
Stone, wood, straw, clay / earth.

Why do you think people used all of these different materials? Think about their properties.
Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Look closely at the painting Castle and Sun by Paul Klee. An image of it can be found here:

Discuss in detail the colours chosen and the geomatical style. Produce a picture of a castle of your choice in the style of Paul Klee.
Pupils should be taught:
- to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination
- to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design and build your own castle. Think about how the knights would defend the castle. Can you make the draw bridge go up and down?When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design
- design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
- generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make
- select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
- select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Evaluate
- evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.
Technical knowledge
- build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable.
- explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Locate England, Scotland, Wales and N Ireland on a map. Now find the capital cities - London, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast. Windsor Castle, the largest occupied castle in the world, is a few miles west of London. The other cities all have castles in them. Draw a castle symbol on a map of the United Kingdom to show where these castles are.

An outline map of the UK can be found here.

Using the points of the compass, describe the location of each of these castles in relation to each other e.g. Windsor Castle is east of Cardiff Castle.
Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find out about the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Draw a picture of the battle and write down some of the facts that you find out about the battle. You could begin by looking here.
Learn about events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Find Open the Drawbridge - KS1 song, There was a Princess Long Ago, and In the Hairy, Scary Castle.

Learn the songs and sing them to someone you know.

Can you add some actions to the songs?

Now can you think of another line you could add to In the Hairy, Scary Castle?
Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the song Open the Drawbridge, create a short dance for the king when he enters the castle and then for the queen, prince and soldier when they enter.Perform dances using simple movement patterns.

Year 3

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Oxford Owl and, if you have not already done so, set up and account. Select poetry from the Book Type tab. Then select the book Castle Poems. A search for OUP, Castle Poems, teaching notes will find a PDF containing teaching ideas for the book. Read the poem Time Slip. Check you know the meaning of all the words including battlements, knight, drawbridge - use a dictionary if you are not sure. As you read the poem can you sense the rhythm of the words? When you have read it through silently a few times read it out loud. How does it sound? Reread it until you are able to say it fluently and with expression Ð imagine you are performing it to an audience. Can you identify where the time slip occurs in the poem? How does the poet achieve the change? How does it move back into the present time? How do you think the boys feel when they are confronted by the knight and when they raise their heads afterwards? What do you think really happened? (Don't forget the hoofprints!)

The poem tells a story - this is called a narrative poem.

Retell the poem as a story.

Can you identify the rhyming pattern in the poem?
Prepare poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.

Understand what he/she reads independently by drawing inferences such as inferring characters' feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.

Recognise some different forms of poetry [for example, free verse, narrative poetry].
Now read the poem The Ruined Castle. Is this a narrative poem or a descriptive poem? The poet uses repetition in the way she starts each of the stanzas. What is the impact of that? What do you think the lines The hearth is blackened with skeletons of flame mean? Is it an effective description? What is the picture it creates in your mind? Is there a rhyming pattern to this poem?


Choose one more poem from the book and read it. Which of the three poems you have read did you enjoy the most and why? Were there any particular words and phrases you liked in the poems you have read? What made them stand out to you?
Recognise some different forms of poetry [for example, free verse, narrative poetry].

Identify how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning.

Discussing words and phrases that capture the reader's interest and imagination.
Go to DK Findout!

Select 13th Century Castles and Early Castles and read what it says about them. Check that you know the meaning of the words which describe the different parts of the castle. If you are unsure look them up in a dictionary and click on each word to find out more. What have you learnt about castles through reading these pages? If you are interested, read further to find out about people that lived in a castle, knights and the food they ate.
Read books that are structured in different ways and read for a range of purposes.

Use dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Watch this clip to reinforce and extend your knowledge and understanding of castle related words.

Make a list of at least ten of the words you have been learning about e.g. battlements, keep.

Arrange the words in alphabetical order.

Now write a glossary giving a definition for each of the words. Check that you have spelt all the words correctly - use a dictionary to check.
Write down ideas and / or key words, including new vocabulary.

Write for different purposes.
Drawing on your own experience of visiting a castle and / or on what you have learnt about castles through your reading and your work in history, write a descriptive poem about a castle. Use the poems you have read as a model.

Aim to give your reader a clear picture of what your castle looks like through your word choices and by using at least one simile in your poem.
Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.

Use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary.
Write your own version of Sleeping Beauty changing some of the details.

For example, what made her fall asleep and how she was woken up again. Start your story Once upon a time. When you have finished, check that you have used the correct tense consistently through your story.
Plan their writing by discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.
Imagine you were a knight in a castle long ago. Plan and write a story telling of your adventures Ð perhaps you went into battle or rescued a captured princess or took part in a jousting contest. Think about the setting for your story and your character the knight, as well as the adventures you have. Use a range of conjunctions, prepositions and adverbs to link your story together.Plan their writing by discussing and recording ideas.

In narratives, create settings, characters and plot.
Go to Spellingframe, select Y3/4 and work through the activities and tests for spelling rule 19 words with the /ay) sound spelt ei, eigh and ey.Spell words with the /e_/ sound spelt ei, eigh, or ey
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you were a knight in a castle long ago. Plan and write a story telling of your adventures Ð perhaps you went into battle or, rescued a captured princess or took part in a jousting contest. Think about the setting for your story and your character the knight as well as the adventures you have. Use a range of conjunctions, prepositions and adverbs to link your story together.Use conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are a knight from a medieval castle and you are putting your armour on - a task that took 15 minutes even with help. How will you move around when you are wearing your armour? How will you prepare for a jousting tournament?

Find out more about knights and how to become one here.
Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates.
In your work on castles you may have come across the words keep (a fortified tower) and page (an apprentice knight). Can you give another meaning for those words? Give two meanings for each of the following: table, train, bat, well and match.Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Here are the heights of the keeps of some castles in England:

Castle Keep | Height (m)
Dover - 25.3
Tower of London - 27
Colchester - 18
Hedingham - 28.6
Norwich - 27
Rochester - 34

Order the heights of the keeps in ascending order.

Work out the differences in heights between some of the keeps.

If each keep was four times higher, how high would they be? What about if they were five times higher, or six, or seven?

Can you find out the heights of the keeps of some other castles to add to the list? How much taller or shorter than the castles above are they?
Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value.

Solve problems, including missing number problems, involving multiplication and division, including positive integer scaling problems.
The Tower of London was used as a prison right up until the 1950s. Here are some of the prisoners who were held in the Tower. The dates are the year in which they were sent to the Tower.

Name | Year in which they were sent to the Tower
James 1, King of Scotland | 1406
Owian Glyndwr, Welsh rebel leader | 1409
Edward V, King of England (imprisoned by his uncle, Richard III) | 1483
Thomas More (imprisoned by Henry VIII for not agreeing that Henry should be head of the church) | 1534
Anne Boleyn (Second wife of Henry VIII) | 1536
Jane Grey (imprisoned by her rival, Queen Mary, for trying to take the throne) | 1553
Guy Fawkes (tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament) | 1605

Use a scale of 1cm = 10 years, create a timeline to show when these people were sent to the Tower. Start your timeline at 1400 and end at 1610.
Measure, compare, add and subtract lengths (m/cm/mm).
Draw a shield shape on squared paper like this one:

Shield Shape

You can download squared paper here.

Design an image for your shield by colouring whole, half or quarter squares. Use five colours

Make it so that your shield has been coloured in ¼ in one colour, ¼ in a second colour, ⅕ in a third colour, ⅕ in a fourth colour, and ⅒ in a fifth colour.

Design and colour another shield. What fraction of the shield is coloured in each colour?
Recognise, find and write fractions of a discrete set of objects: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Castles are built from stone, but some types of stone are better for building than others. Stone that is hard and does not crumble apart is best. Chalk is stone but is it so soft that you wouldn’t want to build a castle wall with it.

Go into your garden or for a walk and collect some different types of stones. Look for stones that are different colours and shades – that tends to mean that they are different kinds of stone.

Find a piece of concrete and rub the stones on the concrete. What happens to each stone? Which stones that you have collected are harder than others? Which would you want to use lots of to build a castle? Are there any stones that you found that you wouldn’t want to use?
Compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and physical properties.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Research a portrait painter of your choice. Pick a portrait and try to recreate it simply by dressing up yourself. The one below could be recreated using a dark blazer, jacket or cardigan. Use paper to create the white fabric. Draw on a moustache and there you go you have transformed yourself! Take a photograph and then display it beside the original painting.

Portrait Painting
Pupils should be taught about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Head Protection.

Knights wore helmets to protect their heads. Research the different types of helmets. Can you design and make a prototype helmet to fit your head from cardboard?
When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design
- Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.

Make
- Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.
- Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

Evaluate
- Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Locate Windsor, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast on a map of the UK.

Now find Colchester, Dover, Stirling, Caernarfon and Enniskillen, all of which have a castle. Which county are these castles in?

Draw a castle symbol on a map of the United Kingdom to show where these castles are.

An outline map of the UK can be found here.

Choose one of the castles and imagine you live there. Using the eight points of the compass, (N, NE, E, SE, S, SW, W, NW) describe where each of the other castles is in relation to your ‘home’.
Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom.

Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
A castle is a place that is built so that people can defend themselves from attack. In Britain, the very first ‘castles’ were hill forts built by the Celts.

Find out about hill forts. You could start here:
Link 1
Link 2
Link 3
Link 4

When the Romans came to Britain, they built forts. Find out about Roman forts.

You could start here:
Link 1
Link 2

Write a list of how hill forts and Roman forts were similar and how they were different.
Use historic terms related to the period of study.

Pupils should be taught about the Roman invasion and its impact on Britain.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Watch and listen to the waltz from the Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky

Can you identify all the instruments you see and hear playing? Find out three things about the composer Pyotr (Peter) Ilyich Tchaikovsky.
Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the music from The Sleeping Beauty devise your own dance using and repeating at least three different movement patterns. Listen carefully to the music to ensure you keep your movements in time with it.Perform dances using a range of movement patterns.

Year 4

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Oxford Owl and select poetry from the Book Type tab. If you do not already have an account (free) you will need to set one up. Then select the book Castle Poems. A search for OUP, Castle Poems, teaching notes will find a PDF containing teaching ideas for the book. Read the poem Time Slip. Check you know the meaning of all the words including battlements, knight, drawbridge – use a dictionary if you are not sure. As you read the poem can you sense the rhythm of the words? When you have read it through silently a few times read it out loud. How does it sound? Reread it until you are able to say it fluently and with expression – imagine you are performing it to an audience. Can you identify where the ‘time slip’ occurs in the poem? How does the poet achieve the change? How does it move back into the present time? How do you think the boys feel when they are confronted by the knight and when they raise their heads afterwards? What do you think really happened? (Don’t forget the hoofprints!)

The poem tells a story – this is called a narrative poem.
Retell the poem as a story.

Can you identify the rhyming pattern in the poem?
Prepare poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.

Understand what he/she reads independently by drawing inferences such as inferring characters' feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence clearly taken from the text.

Recognise some different forms of poetry [for example, free verse, narrative poetry].
Now read the poem The Ruined Castle. Is this a narrative poem or a descriptive poem? The poet uses repetition in the way she starts each of the stanzas. What is the impact of that? What do you think the lines The hearth is blackened with skeletons of flame mean? Is it an effective description? What is the picture it creates in your mind? Is there a rhyming pattern to this poem?Recognise some different forms of poetry [for example, free verse, narrative poetry].


Identify how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning.
Choose two more poems from the book and read them. Which of the four poems you have read did you enjoy the most and why? Were there any particular words and phrases you liked in the poems you have read? What made them stand out to you?Discuss words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination.
Go to DK Findout!

Select 13th Century Castles and Early Castles and read what it says about them. Check that you know the meaning of the words which describe the different parts of the castle. If you are unsure look them up in a dictionary and click on each word to find out more. What have you learnt about castles through reading these pages? If you are interested read further to find out about people that lived in a castle, knights and the food they ate.
Read books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.

Use dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Watch this clip to reinforce and extend your knowledge and understanding of castle related words.

Make a list of at least ten of the words you have been learning about e.g. battlements, keep. Arrange the words in alphabetical order. Now write a glossary giving a definition for each of the words. Check that you have spelt all the words correctly - use a dictionary to check.
Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.

Use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary.
Drawing on your own experience of visiting a castle and / or on what you have learnt about castles through your reading and your work in history write a descriptive poem about a castle. Using the poems, you have read as a model, aim to give your reader a clear picture of what your castle looks like through your word choices and by using at least two similes in your poem.Plan their writing by discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.
Imagine you were a knight in a castle long ago. Plan and write a story telling of your adventures – perhaps you went into battle or, rescued a captured princess or took part in a jousting contest. Think about the setting for your story and your character the knight as well as the adventures you have. Use a range of fronted adverbials through your story and choose nouns or pronouns appropriately to ensure clarity and cohesion in your story.Plan their writing by discussing and recording ideas.

In narratives, create settings, characters and plot.
Imagine you were a knight in a castle long ago. Plan and write a story telling of your adventures Ð perhaps you went into battle or rescued a captured princess or took part in a jousting contest. Think about the setting for your story and your character the knight, as well as the adventures you have. Use a range of conjunctions, prepositions and adverbs to link your story together.Plan their writing by discussing and recording ideas.

In narratives, create settings, characters and plot.
Go to Spellingframe, select Y3/4 and work through the activities and tests for spelling rule 18 words with the s sounds spelt sc as in science and crescent.Spell words with the /s/ sound spelt sc (Latin in origin).
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you were a knight in a castle long ago. Plan and write a story telling of your adventures - perhaps you went into battle or rescued a captured princess or took part in a jousting contest.

Think about the setting for your story and your character the knight as well as the adventures you have.

Use a range of fronted adverbials through your story and choose nouns or pronouns appropriately to ensure clarity and cohesion in your story. Include some speech in your story taking care to ensure it is punctuated correctly.
Use fronted adverbials, using commas after fronted adverbials.

Choose nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are a knight from a medieval castle, and you are putting your armour on - a task that took 15 minutes even with help? How will you move around when you are wearing your armour? How will you prepare for a jousting tournament?

Find out more about knights and how to become one here.
Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates.
In your work on castles you may have come across the words keep (a fortified tower) and page (an apprentice knight). Can you give another meaning for those words? Give two meanings for each of the following: table, train, bat, well, match, desert, object and address.Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Download a plan of Stokesay Castle in Shropshire.

You will see that it is a really irregular shape. Identify where there are acute and obtuse angles.
Identify acute and obtuse angles and compare and order angles up to two right angles by size.
Here are the heights of the keeps of some castles in England:

Heights of Castles

Create a bar chart to show the heights of these castle keeps. You will need to decide on a suitable scale for your graph.

Use the internet - can you find the heights of some other castle keeps to add to your graph?
Interpret and present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs.
Here are the dates in which work began to build some castles in Britain:

Castle Building Dates

Create a timeline to show the dates that these castles were begun. You will need to think about which year to begin your timeline on and how many years one centimetre will represent.
Interpret and present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs.

Solve problems involving integer scaling problems.
Create or download a co-ordinate grid in the first quadrant. You can download a grid from here.

Use this to create an image of a castle.

Record the co-ordinates that you joined up to create your image.
Describe positions on a 2-D grid as coordinates in the first quadrant.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Castles are built from stone, but some types of stone are better for building than others.

Some stones, for example, will soak up water - they are permeable (let water through). Some are impermeable (don’t let water through). You ideally want to use stones that do not let water through.

Go into your garden or for a walk and collect some stones. Look for different types of stones. Looking for stones of different colours usually means that you will find different types of stone.

Drip water on the stones that you bring back. What happens when you drop on them? If the water just sits on the surface, the stone is impermeable. If it soaks in, the stone is permeable. Are the stones that you have found from permeable or impermeable rocks?
Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Produce a piece of artwork in response to one of the poems that you have studied. It could be a drawing, painting or sculpture.Pupils should be taught:
to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design your own family coat of arms. What would be the key symbols for your family? Share your design with someone else and explain the significance of it.Design:
- design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
- generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Locate Windsor, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast on a map of the UK.

Now find Colchester, Dover, Warwick, Rochester, Stirling, Caernarfon, Conway and Enniskillen, all of which have a castle. Which county are these castles in?

Draw a castle symbol on a map of the United Kingdom to show where these castles are.

An outline map of the UK can be found here.

Choose one of the castles and imagine you live there. Using the eight points of the compass, (N, NE, E, SE, S, SW, W, NW) describe where each of the other castles is in relation to your ‘home’.
Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom.

Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Design an information leaflet for visitors who are visiting Hedingham Castle for a day out.

Here is some information about the castle:
Link 1
Link 2

A good example (the leaflet for Edinburgh Castle) can be found here.

Include:
A brief history of the castle
A map so that people can find the castle
Prices for entry
Opening times
A local history study.

Use historic terms related to the period of study.

Use dates related to the passing of time.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Watch and listen to the waltz from the Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky

Can you identify all the instruments you see and hear playing? Find out three things about the composer Pyotr (Peter) Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Name three other pieces of music he wrote.
Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the music from The Sleeping Beauty devise your own dance using and repeating at least four different movement patterns. Listen carefully to the music to ensure you keep your movements in time with it.Perform dances using a range of movement patterns.

Year 5

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Oxford Owl and select ages 9-11 from the Ages tab (you will need to sign up to Oxford Owl first).
Select the book So you want to build a castle.
Before you start reading look at the Before Reading questions on p0 and answer them.
Read pages 26–49 which are about four different castles under siege. Compare the four accounts, how is each of these stories told? Which account do you find most interesting, is it because of what happened or the way in which it is written? How does the language and structure vary in the different presentations? Are some versions more formal than others?

Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by making comparisons within a book.

Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.
Before using the index on p55 to help you find what the following are, have a guess at that you think they might be:
- concentric castles
- barbican
- garderobes
- bossing
- machicolations

Now find five other words in the book that are specifically about castles and, using the book to help you, write a definition of the words.
Now list all of the words in alphabetical order. Can you add any more words to your glossary?
Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.
Go to Stories to Grow by and read the story of The Sword in the Stone.
Can you find out what the name of Arthur’s Castle was? How did the characters, Arthur, Sir Kay, Sir Ector, Merlin and the crowd of onlookers feel when Arthur pulled out the stone? How do you know?

You can read more about the legend of King Arthur at Caerleon Net
Understand what he/she reads by drawing inferences such as inferring characters' feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
The four accounts of the sieges were written as a comic strip, newspaper reports, a diary and letters. Choose one of the accounts and rewrite it in a different form, for example write the siege of Rochester Castle as a diary or comic strip.
Try to ensure that your version of the siege retains all of the main points of the action and with a clear sequence of events over time. Use adverbs and modal verbs to indicate degrees of possibility.
Draft and write by accurately précising longer passages.

Draft and write by using devices to build cohesion within and across sentences and paragraphs e.g. then, after that, this, firstly.
Before using the index on p55 to help you find what the following are, have a guess at that you think they might be:
- concentric castles
- barbican
- garderobes
- bossing
- machicolations

Now find five other words in the book that are specifically about castles and using the book to help you, write a definition of the words.

Now list all of the words in alphabetical order. Can you add any more words to your glossary?
Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.
Write a story based on the story of Arthur in which a young boy or girl is pronounced King or Queen after completing some sort of challenge.
What was the challenge and why did the person want to have a go at it?
Were they the lost child of the royal family or a special person chosen to take up the crown?
When you have finished check that tense has been used consistently throughout the story.
Evaluate and edit by ensuring the mostly consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.
Go to Spellingframe and select Y5/6 and work through the activities and tests for Spelling Rule 47 - words with silent letters.Spell words with ‘silent’ letters (i.e. letters whose presence cannot be predicted from the pronunciation of the word).
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
The four accounts of the sieges were written as a comic strip, newspaper reports, a diary and letters. Choose one of the accounts and rewrite it in a different form, for example write the siege of Rochester Castle as a diary or comic strip.

Try to ensure that your version of the siege retains all of the main points of the action and with a clear sequence of events over time. Use adverbs and modal verbs to indicate degrees of possibility.
Indicate degrees of possibility using adverbs e.g. perhaps, surely or modal verbs e.g. might, should, will, must.

Use devices to build cohesion within a paragraph e.g. then, after that, this, firstly.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are one of the knights, act out how you tried to pull the sword out of the stone. What did you say when you couldn’t do it?

Now pretend you are Arthur – what happened when you tried to pull the sword out?
Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Here are the dimensions of castle keeps from some castles in England:

Castle Keep Dimensions for Year5

Decide on a scale so that you can draw rectangles on paper to represent that areas of these keeps. Work out the area that each of these keeps covers.
Calculate and compare the area of rectangles (including squares), and including using standard units square centimetres (cm2) and square metres (m2).
The Grand Reception Room at Windsor Castle is 30m long and 12m wide. Work out the area of the floor of the room.

Measure one of the rooms in your home. Work out the area.

How many times bigger is the Grand Reception Room at Windsor Castle than the room on your home?
Calculate and compare the area of rectangles (including squares), and including using standard units square centimetres (cm2) and square metres (m2).
Here are the number of people that visited some castles in Britain in 2018:

Table of Castle Visitors

Round these to the nearest power of 10 (i.e. round them to the nearest 10, then the nearest 100, then the nearest 1000, then the nearest 10,000, then the nearest 100,000).

Find the total number of visitors who visited all of these castles together.

Use what you have done in rounding these numbers to the nearest 10,000 to create a bar chart to show the number of visitors to these castles. You will have to decide on a suitable scale.
Round any number up to 1,000,000 to the nearest 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 and 100,000.
Download a plan of Stokesay Castle in Shrophere here

You will see that it is a really irregular shape.
Estimate and then measure some of the angles that you can see in on the ground plan.
Know angles are measured in degrees.

Estimate and compare acute, obtuse and reflex angles.

Draw given angles, and measure them in degrees (o)
Draw a shield shape on squared paper like this one:

Shield Template

You can download squared paper here
Design an image for your shield by colouring whole or half squares. Calculate the percentage of the shield that is coloured in each colour.
Recognise the per cent symbol (%) and understand that per cent relates to number of parts per hundred, and write percentages as a fraction with denominator 100, and as a decimal.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Catapults were heavy weapons used to batter down castle walls.

Design and build a simple catapult. Here are some instructions, you will need:
- two lolly sticks
- a couple of elastic bands
- a pen top (or a small Lego brick)
- a bottle top.

Explore how far your catapult can launch rolled up pieces of paper or foil. Do not use stones or marbles or anything hard!
Is there a relationship between the size of the rolled up piece of paper/foil and the distance that it travels?

Explain how the rolled up piece of paper/foil travels from the catapult. Maybe create a diagram and label how gravity and air resistance work on the paper/foil.

If you have the materials, look for other designs of model catapults on the internet and make them. Which is the most effective?
Explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object.

Identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfaces.
Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Research famous artists who painted castles. For example:
- Monet - Castle of Dolceacqua and The Castle in Antibes
- Turner - Norham castle and Dunstanborough castle
- Constable
- Signac
- Rogers

Identify your favourite painting. Paint a castle of your choice in a similar style.
Pupils should be taught:
- to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials (for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay).
- about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Missile Attack! Build a trebuchet. You will need to use your knowledge of forces and pulleys.
These two links will support you:
- How trebuchets work
- Mini trebuchet science

How effective is your trebuchet?
Make
- Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.
- Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

Technical knowledge
- Apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures  understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages].
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Locate Windsor, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast on a map of the UK.
Now find the following locations, all of which have catles:
Colchester
- Dover
- Warwick
- Rochester
- Durham
- Kenilworth
- Stirling
- Dunvegan
- Harlech
- Caernarfon
- Conway
- Pembroke
- Enniskillen
- Carrickfergus

Which county are these castles in?
Draw a castle symbol on a map of the United Kingdom to show where these castles are.

An outline map of the UK can be found here

How many castles are there in the county you live in?
Locate them on a map and give the grid reference for each castle. Using the points of the compass describe where they are in relation to each other.

Choose three castles (from the first list or in your county) and find out more about where they are located. What are the similarities and differences between the location of the castles, for example are they on the coast, in a valley?
Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom.

Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

Describe and understand key aspects of human geography including types of settlement and land use.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Have a look at the timeline for Hedingham Castle here

The version on the website is not an accurate timeline. Place the events and dates on a timeline that is drawn accurately. You will need to use your maths skills to decide on a scale for your timeline.

The events on the website’s timeline are written in a jokey style. Think about what sensible labels for your timeline would need to look like.
For example, where the website says “1748 – Horace Walpole, son of Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister, visits Hedingham and makes scathing remarks about the House. Great name Horace,” a sensible label would just be "1748 - Horace Walpole, son of Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister, visits Hedingham."
Use dates to order and place events on a timeline.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the music from Dance of the Knights devise your own dance using and repeating at least four different movement patterns including at least one high and one low movement.

Listen carefully to the music to ensure you keep your movements in time with it.
Perform dances using a range of movement patterns.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to Dance of the Knights on YouTube.

Do you recognise the music? Is it the theme music to a television programme? Who wrote the music and which ballet is it from? Find out about the composer and other music he wrote. What is the name of his "symphonic fairy tale for children"?


Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.

Year 6

Reading
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Go to Oxford Owl and select ages 9-11 from the Ages tab (you will need to sign up to Oxford Owl first)
Select the book So you want to build a castle.
Before you start reading look at the Before Reading questions on p0 and answer them.
Read pages 26–49 which are about four different castles under siege. Compare the four accounts, how is each of these stories told? Which account do you find most interesting, is it because of what happened or the way in which it is written? How does the language and structure vary in the different presentations? Identify where the language is very formal and where it is more informal. What makes the difference? Can you find some examples of informal language and some of more formal language?
Understand what he/she reads by identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.

Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what he/she reads by making comparisons within and across books.
Before using the index on p55 to help you find what the following are, have a guess at what you think they might be:
- concentric castles
- barbican
- garderobes
- bossing
- machicolations

Now find five other words in the book that are specifically about castles and, using the book to help you, write a definition of the words. Now list all of the words in alphabetical order. Can you add any more words to your glossary?
Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.
Go to Stories to Grow by and read the story of The Sword in the Stone.
Can you find out what the name of Arthur’s Castle was? How did the characters, Arthur, Sir Kay, Sir Ector, Merlin and the crowd of onlookers feel when Arthur pulled out the stone? How do you know? Imagine you have been asked to tweet the story to a newspaper, retell the story using no more than 280 characters.

You can read more about the legend of King Arthur at Caerleon Net
Understand what he/she reads by summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas and using quotations for illustration.
Writing
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
The four accounts of the sieges were written as a comic strip, newspaper reports, a diary and letters. Choose one of the accounts and rewrite it in a different form, for example write the siege of Rochester Castle as a diary or comic strip.
Consider the level of formality which is needed and how you will convey that whilst ensuring that your account includes all the main details of the action but written in your own words.
Distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register.

Draft and write by accurately precising longer passages.
Before using the index on p55 to help you find what the following are, have a guess at that you think they might be:
- concentric castles
- barbican
- garderobes
- bossing
- machicolations

Now find five other words in the book that are specifically about castles and, using the book to help you, write a definition of the words.

Now list all of the words in alphabetical order. Can you add any more words to your glossary?
Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.
Write a story based on the story of Arthur in which a young boy or girl is pronounced King or Queen after completing some sort of challenge.
What was the challenge and why did the person want to have a go at it?
Were they the lost child of the royal family or a special person chosen to take up the crown?
When you have finished check that tense has been used consistently throughout the story.
Evaluate and edit by ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.
Go to Spellingframe and select Y5/6 and work through the activities and tests for Spelling Rule 43 - Adding suffixes beginning with a vowel to words ending in -fer.Add suffixes beginning with vowel letters to words ending in –fer.
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
The four accounts of the sieges were written as a comic strip, newspaper reports, a diary and letters. Choose one of the accounts and rewrite it in a different form, for example write the siege of Rochester Castle as a diary or comic strip.

Consider the level of formality which is needed and how you will convey that whilst ensuring that your account includes all the main details of the action but written in your own words.
Understand the difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing.

Exercise an assured and conscious control over levels of formality, particularly through manipulating grammar and vocabulary to achieve this.
Spoken Language
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Imagine you are one of the knights, act out how you tried to pull the sword out of the stone. What did you say when you couldn’t do it?

Now pretend you are Arthur, what happened when you tried to pull the sword out?
Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates.
Mathematics
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Here are some measurements showing the length, width and height of the keeps of some castles in Britain.

Castle Measurements Table

These keeps are roughly cuboid in shape. Calculate the volume of each of the keeps.

Create a graph to compare the volumes of the keeps.
Calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids using standard units, including cubic centimetres (cm3) and cubic metres (m3).
Use a co-ordinate grid with four quadrants. One can be found here

Follow these instructions to draw lines to create a flag.
Join (-12,6) to (12,6) to (10,3) to (12, 0) to (10, -3) to (12, -6) to (-12, -6) to (-12, 6)

Join (2,5) to (3, 3) to (2, 1) to (1,3) to (2,5)

Join (5, 5) to (6,3) to (5,1) to (4, 3) to (5, 5)

Join (8,5) to (9,3) to (8,1) to (7,3) to (8,5)

Join (0, -4) to (6, -1) to (10, -3)

Join (0, -6) to (6, -3) to (12, -6)

Join (-10, -1) to (-9, -1) to (-9, -2) to (-8, -2) to (-8, -1) to (-7, -1) to (-7, -2) to (-6, -2) to (-6, -1) to (-5, -1) to (-5, -2) to (-4, -2) to (-4, -1) to (-3, -1) to (-3, -5) to (-10, -5) to (-10, -1)

Join (-8, -5) to (-7, -4) to (-7, -3) to (-6, -3) to (-5, -4) to (-5, -5)

Join (-11, 4) to (-11, 5) to (-10, 4) to (-5,4) to (-5,5) to (-2,5) to (-3,4) to (-2, 4) to (-2,3) to (-5, 3) to (-5, 1) to (-6, 1) to (-6, 2) to (-9, 2) to (-9, 1) to (-10, 1) to (-10, 4)

Have a go at creating a flag of your own and list out the co-ordinates to join to create the flag.
Describe positions on the full coordinate grid (all four quadrants).
Draw a shield shape on squared paper like this one:
Shield Template
Solve problems involving unequal sharing and grouping using knowledge of fractions and multiples
You can download squared paper here:

Design an image for your shield using just three colours to colour in squares or half squares. You must use a ratio of 2:3:5 for your colours.
Solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts.
Here are the visitor numbers for some castles in Britain in 2018
Round these to the nearest 10,000.
Create a pie chart to show this data.

Table of Castle Visitors
Interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems.
Science
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Make shadow puppets of knights, soldiers, lords, ladies etc. A simple example can be found here on YouTube

Be creative – if you do not have garden canes, use pencils. If you don’t have black card, then an old cereal packet will do.

Explore what happens to the shadow when you hold your puppet closer to the light source, or further away from the light source.

Hold your puppet part way between the light source and the surface that our are shining your light on. Put a piece of paper on the wall and draw around the shadow (you’ll probably need some help here).

How do you have to move your puppet to make the shadow half / twice as tall?

Can you design your shadow puppets so that you make use of holes for eyes or other details?

You could have some fun and act out the story of St George and the Dragon. A version can be found here at Storynory
Recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines.

Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.

Art and Design
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Illuminating Letters
Decorated letters were used to make it obvious to the reader where to start reading.

Draw your own illuminated letter for your initial letter of your first name.

Try out potential designs in your sketch book. Choose one to develop further on A4. Decorate and colour in with pencils or paints.

Find out more about illuminated letters at Study.com
Pupils should be taught:
- to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.
- to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials.
Design and Technology
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
In castles, bread was baked daily. Design your own savoury flavoured bread.

If you have the ingredients why not test it out? Ask someone else to taste it.

Evaluate the finished product. Would you make changes if you were going to make it again?
Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet.

Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.
Geography
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Locate Windsor, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast on a map of the UK.
Now find the following locations, all of which have castles:
- Colchester
- Dover
- Warwick
- Rochester
- Durham
- Kenilworth
- Stirling
- Dunvegan
- Caernarfon
- Conway
- Enniskillen
- Carrickfergus

Which county are these castles in?
Draw a castle symbol on a map of the United Kingdom to show where these castles are.
An outline map of the UK can be found here
Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom.

Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

Describe and understand key aspects of human geography including types of settlement and land use.
How many castles are there in the county you live in?
Locate them on a map and give the grid reference for each castle. Using the points of the compass describe where they are in relation to each other.

Choose three of the castles and find out more about where they are located. Are there any similarities between the location of the castles for example are they on the coast or in a valley?
Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom.

Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

Describe and understand key aspects of human geography including types of settlement and land use.
History
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Many castles were built in England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. They were called motte and bailey castles. These were quickly built out of earth and wood. They were replaced with stone castles over time.
Find out about motte and bailey castles and create an information poster that could be displayed in a classroom to tell children about this kind of castle.

Here are some useful websites:
- Primary Facts
- Spartacus Educational
- History Kids

Include a labelled diagram of a motte and bailey castle. Also Include a brief outline of what happened during the Norman Conquest of 1066.
You could start here:
- The School Run
- Primary Homework Help


Apply understanding of chronology across the periods they study.

Place events, people and changes precisely within a chronological framework.
Music
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Listen to Dance of the Knights on YouTube.
Do you recognise the music? Is it the theme music to a television programme? Who wrote the music and which ballet is it from? Find out about the composer and other music he wrote. What is the name of his "symphonic fairy tale for children"?

Now listen to this clip
This is from a ballet by another composer of the same nationality. What can you find out about this music and its composer?
Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
Physical Education
Learning TaskNational Curriculum Link
Using the music from Dance of the Knights devise your own dance using and repeating at least five different movement patterns including at least two high and two low movement.

Listen carefully to the music to ensure you keep your movements in time with it.
Perform dances using a range of movement patterns.

Book List - KS1

TitleCreator(s)Book ISBNeBook ISBN
Castles

Castles by Stephanie Turnbull
Stephanie Turnbull9781474981989
Peep Inside the Castle

Peep Inside the Castle by Anna Milbourne & Felicita Sala
Anna Milbourne &
Felicita Sala
9781409582052
In the Castle

In the Castle by Anna Milbourne & Benji Davis
Anna Milbourne &
Benji Davis
9781409536772Available on Kindle
Knights and Castles

Knights and Castles by Rachel Firth
Rachel Firth9781409506621Available on Kindle
Winnie and Wilbur - The Naughty Knight

Winnie and Wilbur - The Naughty Knight by Valerie Thomas & Korky Paul
Valerie Thomas &
Korky Paul
97801927595049780192759481
Good Knight, Bad Knight

Good Knight, Bad Knight by Tom Knight
Tom Knight9781783703623Available on Kindle
Princess Daisy and the Dragon and the Nincompoop Knights

Princess Daisy and the Dragon and the Nincompoop Knights by Steven Lenton
Steven Lenton9780857632883
Castles

Castles by Colin Thompson
Colin Thompson9780099439424

Book List - KS2

TitleCreator(s)Book ISBNeBook ISBN
DK Find out! Castles

DK Find out! Castles by Philip Steele
Philip Steele97802413584369780241410110
Dark Knights and Dingy Castles

Dark Knights and Dingy Castles by Terry Deary and Philip Reeve
Terry Deary and Philip Reeve9781407179827Available on Kindle
Knights and Bikes

Knights and Bikes by Gabrielle Kent
Gabrielle Kent9781999642501
You Wouldn't Want to be a Medieval Knight

You Wouldn't Want to be a Medieval Knight by Fiona MacDonald & David Antram
Fiona MacDonald & David Antram9781909645585
The Usborne Official Knight’s Handbook

The Usborne Official Knight’s Handbook by Sam Taplin & Ian McNee
Sam Taplin & Ian McNee9781409567752
Howl’s Moving Castle

Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianne Wynne Jones
Dianne Wynne Jones97800072992639780007380459

Or eAudio at:
9780008389475
Dragons at Crumbling Castle

Dragons at Crumbling Castle by Terry Pratchett
Terry Pratchett97805525728049781448195770

Or eAudio at:
9781448196029
King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table

King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table by Marcia Williams
Marcia Williams9781406318661
Castles

Castles by Colin Thompson
Colin Thompson9780099439424